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Phootball Physics

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Cvankerkhove

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All sports have a lot of physics to them, but one sport in particular I have noticed to demonstrate principles of physics is football. Watching the NFL, the Minnesota Vikings are my favorite team, and though they had a great 5-0 start, ever since the bye week they have been slipping. Here's the physics behind their struggles. 

The pass rush defense is weak. Viking blockers apply a force to the pass rushers, however, the pass rushers force is greater and able to overcome the resisting force. This causes a net force in the direction towards QB Sam Bradford, and as result he gets sacked. Furthermore, in the red zone, Bradfords passing has too much of a vertical component of velocity and not enough horizontal component. The ball is lofted and resulting in interceptions instead of scoring. Bradford needs to decrease that angle to score. Hopefully the Vikings read this post and start winning again!

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