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The Physics of James Bond 007: Nightfire

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michaelkennedy

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In one of my favorite Gamecube games of all time, James Bond 007: Nightfire, you are able to choose from a multitude of characters to play as and complete missions with. One of these characters is names Oddjob, who is extremely short and wears a trademark black bowler hat. This hat will be the focus of my blog. In the game, you are able to take off your hat and throw it at enemies much like a Frisbee, but this isn't playing a game, it's to slice peoples heads off. The 2 reasons the hat is able to fly are the Bernoulli principle and gyroscopic inertia. In simplest terms, the Bernoulli principle is the idea that air flowing below a wing or in this case Oddjob's hat's brim, has a higher pressure than the air flowing above, causing lift. The hat remains stable and spinning because of gyroscopic inertia, which is the principle that a body that is set spinning has a tendency to keep spinning in its original orientation. Both of these principles combined cause a stable, spinning, flying blade which gives you an edge up on your enemies. 

 

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007 Night fire was my absolute favorite game of all time, except I played on the ps2. The best gun was the rocket launcher where you could shoot it and then control where the missile goes after you shoot it. Do a blog on that gun.  

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