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Inertia in Sci-fi

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Bogart

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Recently, I've been replaying one of my favorite sci-fi video games, and came across a pretty amusing conversation.

For some quick context before I post the video, the game is in the future when humanity has advanced enough to have efficient space travel, allowing them to colonize other planets. They also advanced enough to have giant spaceships with giant guns on them. How fun. In the exact scene in the video, there's a drill sergeant yelling at 2 cadets about firing nuclear-grade armaments at other ships.

Warning: The following video contains graphic language, even though chances are you don't really care.

 

 

I just like to think of what events had to happen for this drill sergeant to have to chew out these cadets. Did this Serviceman Chung fire out multiple nukes into space while guessing his aim? It's a pretty amusing scenario, and not that unlikely either. I suppose that if we do manage to advance technology far enough, this would become an issue. We couldn't just fire willy-nilly out into space, because it might eventually hit someone. This is why when I go target shooting at my uncle's house, we shoot towards the bottom of a hill so that any missed shots don't go flying through somebody's window, they just land in the dirt.

It also makes me wonder about how much stuff is just floating around the Earth right now. We don't have rings like Saturn, but there's still plenty orbiting our planet. There's got to be paint chips off of spacecraft we've sent up, maybe a tool that an astronaut accidentally let go of while doing an EVA, and just bits of dust from comets or asteroids. Even something as small as a pebble, when flying through space at multiple kilometers per second can do quite a lot of damage to a satellite.

Well, that's just my train of thought. If you have anything to add, put it in the comments.

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