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Supersonic speed

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baseball00

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As I was scrolling through Instagram, I came across a post by Nasa that said today, October 14th, 2017, is the 70th anniversary of supersonic flight. Supersonic flight is when something is traveling faster than the speed of sound, which is 343 m/s. Of course for the past 70 years this has only been done by noncommercial planes. Well, Nasa is currently working on making supersonic flight a reality for commercial planes. That would mean that you can travel from New York to Los Angeles in 2 hours. Now it takes over 6 hours. Nasa has been researching shock waves, cruise efficiency, and the effect of sonic booms on the environment. Sonic booms are loud boom sounds caused by the waves of sound. It occurs when an object travels at supersonic speed. If Nasa is able to make this a reality in will revolutionize modern travel.

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If you have a chance, read up a bit on Chuck Yeager (and/or follow his Twitter).  An amazing man with an amazing career and a fantastic sense of humor to boot.

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This was a very interesting blog post. I just wanted to add that there was one commercial airline that went above the speed of sound that I can think of off the top of my head. It was retired in 2003 and was known as the Concorde. It flew at Mach 2.04 (1354 MPH) and could hold up to 128 passengers!!!! It was known for crossing the Atlantic Ocean from NYC to London in 3.5 hours. It was definitely a more expensive option than most flights, but could hold large numbers of people. The engineering behind it is fascinating from its drooping nose, to the structural expansion and compression it needed to withstand, and how it endured high temperatures. If you are interested, there are a lot of great videos on the science behind it on YouTube.

I agree with you totally on your point that if Mach travel can be achieved commercially, and most importantly cheaply, then a new age of transportation will begin. Who knows, maybe you can be the guy to figure it out.

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