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  4. Name: Angular Acceleration Introduction Category: Rotational Motion Date Added: 2017-06-26 Submitter: Flipping Physics Angular acceleration is introduced by way of linear acceleration. The units of radians per second squared are discussed. Examples of objects which angular acceleration are shown. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:23 Average angular acceleration 1:02 Angular acceleration units 1:37 Demonstrating objects which have angular acceleration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Angular Velocity Problem - A Turning Bike Tire Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video. Angular Acceleration Introduction
  5. Angular acceleration is introduced by way of linear acceleration. The units of radians per second squared are discussed. Examples of objects which angular acceleration are shown. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:23 Average angular acceleration 1:02 Angular acceleration units 1:37 Demonstrating objects which have angular acceleration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Angular Velocity Problem - A Turning Bike Tire Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video.
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  7. Name: Introductory Angular Velocity Problem - A Turning Bike Tire Category: Rotational Motion Date Added: 2017-06-19 Submitter: Flipping Physics The wheel of a bike rotates exactly 3 times in 12.2 seconds. What is the average angular velocity of the wheel in (a) radians per second and (b) revolutions per minute? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08 Translating the problem 1:32 Solving for the angular velocity in radians per second 2:22 Converting from radians per second to revolutions per minute 3:24 Three common mistakes made by students when doing this conversion. 4:37 Alternate and easier solution for part b Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Angular Velocity Introduction Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video. Introductory Angular Velocity Problem - A Turning Bike Tire
  8. The wheel of a bike rotates exactly 3 times in 12.2 seconds. What is the average angular velocity of the wheel in (a) radians per second and (b) revolutions per minute? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08 Translating the problem 1:32 Solving for the angular velocity in radians per second 2:22 Converting from radians per second to revolutions per minute 3:24 Three common mistakes made by students when doing this conversion. 4:37 Alternate and easier solution for part b Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Angular Acceleration Introduction Previous Video: Angular Velocity Introduction Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  9. Name: Angular Velocity Introduction Category: Circular Motion & Gravity Date Added: 2017-06-12 Submitter: Flipping Physics The equation for average angular velocity is presented in relation to the equation for average linear velocity. Radians per second and revolutions per minute are discusses as the units for angular velocity. Objects which have angular velocity are shows. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:09 Average linear velocity 0:22 Average angular velocity 0:53 The units for angular velocity 1:37 Examples of objects with angular velocity Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Arc Length Problem - Gum on a Bike Tire Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video. Angular Velocity Introduction
  10. The equation for average angular velocity is presented in relation to the equation for average linear velocity. Radians per second and revolutions per minute are discusses as the units for angular velocity. Objects which have angular velocity are shows. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:09 Average linear velocity 0:22 Average angular velocity 0:53 The units for angular velocity 1:37 Examples of objects with angular velocity Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Introductory Angular Velocity Problem - A Turning Bike Tire Previous Video: Introductory Arc Length Problem - Gum on a Bike Tire Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  11. Hey Mr. Fullerton and anyone whos reading this, its been a pleasure grinding this year. Hope you enjoy this great video and maybe even chuckle a bit.
  12. Wow, now that is impressive. Both the eulogy in verse, as well as landing on and returning from Duna. I've never seen a team accomplish that before. Major thumbs up!!!
  13. Very interesting approach -- looking forward to seeing how the final flight goes!
  14. Nice report, and I love the pictures!
  15. Launch Report and Debrief Launch Time: 10:32 Team Members Present: Jason Stack, Marcus NIcholas, Michael Kennedy Play-by-Play: We've lifted off and are headed directly up in an attempt to obtain orbit around Kerbin. We then angle our ship slightly to the east to increase the eccentricity of our orbit. We reached 70,000 meters and now a maneuver is being created to obtain orbit around Kerbin. Our first engine has been decoupled. Orbit has been obtained around Kerbin. We have waited a long time to obtain the proper angular distance from Duna. Now a maneuver is being used to create an encounter with an orbit around Duna. An encounter has been created with an orbit around Duna. We have obtained orbit around Duna. Our second set of engines have been decoupled. Now a maneuver is being created so that we can be pulled into Duna's atmosphere. Now we are attempting to land the ship. We have landed on Duna. Now a memorial flag is being placed on the planet in memory of Valentina. Now we are accelerating off of Duna's surface and a maneuver has been used to obtain orbit around Duna. Now a maneuver is being used to encounter Kerbin. An encounter has been created and we are going back to Kerbin. Orbit has been obtained around Kerbin. Now another maneuver is being used to pull us into Kerbin's atmosphere. We decoupled our last engine and are being pulled toward Kerbin's surface. Our parachute has been deployed. We have landed safely on Kerbin. Photographs: Valentina's Memorial Flag Reads: Forever in Memory Time-of-Flight: 2 years, 153 days, 12:22:31 Summary: We accomplished our goal which was to plant a memorial flag on Duna for Valentina. We accomplished this goal and returned safely back to Kerbin. Opportunities / Learnings: We've tested our rocket design that was used to reach Minmus and now Duna and it has been successful twice. We need to improve our landing gear so that it is easier to land on more difficult planets. Strategies / Project Timeline: Our next goal is to reach a further planet to test our rockets ability. Milestone Awards Presented: We orbited Duna and landed on Duna with a safe return. Available Funds: $3,743,188
  16. Duna or Bust Pre-Flight Available Funds: $376,539 Parts List: Mk16 Parachute ($422) Mk1 Command Pod ($600) 2 Kelus-LV Bay Mobility Enhancer ($440) 2 Mk-2R Radial-Mount Parachute ($400) 8 Sepratron 1 ($75) Advanced Inline Stabilizer ($1200) FL-T400 Fuel Tank ($500) 3 LT-05 Micro Landing Strut ($200) LV-909 "Terrier" Liquid Fuel Engine ($390) 2 TR-18A Stack Decoupler ($400) 3 Mk1 Liquid Fuel Fuselage ($550) LV-N "Nerv" Atomic Rocket Motor ($10000) 3 Aerodynamic Nose Cone ($240) 3 FL-T800 Fuel Tank ($800) 3 LV-T30 "Reliant" Liquid Fuel Engine ($1100) 3 TT-38K Radial Decoupler ($600) 7 EAS-4 Strut Connector ($42) Rockomax Brand Adapter ($500) 2 Rockomax Jumbo-64 Fuel Tank ($5750) RE-M3 "Mainsail" Liquid Fuel Engine ($13000) Design Goals: The Duna or Bust Interplanetary Travel Rocket Is perfectly designed for a single Kerbal manned flight to the red planet, Duna. With it's high efficiency atomic "Nerv" engine, the DBITR is able to easily and safely encounter and enter circular orbit of not only Duna, but most planets relatively close to Kerbin. With safety in mind, we've added multiple emergency thrusters and parachutes in order to counteract any high velocity landing path. Launch Goals: Our major goal for this final launch is to get our pilot, one Bill Kerman, to Duna in order to plant flag eulogizing the Kerbonaut lost by a rival space flight company. Pilot Plan: We'll first exit Kerbin's atmosphere using the Rockomax tanks and "Mainsail" engine with a west to east cicular orbit. Once out of the atmosphere, we'll circularize the orbit at a low altitude, and begin plotting a maneuver for a Duna encounter. We'll then use our remaining fuel in the Rockomax tanks to escape Kerbin's gravity, and At about this time, we'll likely have to switch from our "Mainsail" to the atomic thruster, which we'll use to fine tune the encounter with Duna and match the inclination. Once on course for a Duna encounter, we'll use the atomic thruster to perform a retrograde capture burn, and perform several Hohmann Transfers in order to enter an orbit in high Duna atmosphere in order to aerobrake. About here, we'll use the remainder of our atomic fuel in order to cut as much of our velocity as possible, and enter the final stage. We'll activate our chutes at around 15,000 m, and use our seperatrons in a latch ditch effort to cut any remaining velocity.
  17. Pre-Launch Design Release Team Name: StackBNimble Corp. Available Funds: $299,018 Vehicle Name: Boi #2 Vehicle Parts List and Cost: Command Pod Mk 1: ($600) Parachute Mk16: ($422) 18A Stack Decoupler X2: ($800) Fuel Tank FL-T400 x3: ($1500) Swivel Liquid Fuel Engine x4: ($2400) Radiator Panels x2: ($300) Radial Decoupler TT-38K x4: ($2400) RT-10 Solid Fuel Booster x4: ($1600) Aerodynamic Nose Cone x4: ($960) Total: $17,262 Design Goals: Our vehicle is designed to possess maximum thrusting power in order to leave Kerbin's atmosphere, achieve stable orbit, and return safely to Kerbin. Launch Goal: In this launch, we hoped to achieve the following milestones: Orbiting Mun (+ safe return) - $200,000 Landing on Mun ( + safe return) - $250,000 Pilot Plan: We will use the SAS system to help us stay on track in getting into orbit. Our plan is to fly vertically upward, then rotate our rocket to about 65 degrees, then decouple our thruster when out of fuel. We will attempt to achieve a parabolic arc path. Once we have reached a certain altitude, we will accelerate to the horizon until stable orbit is achieved. Once orbit is achieved, we will calculate the angle at which we need to accelerate towards Mun and will attempt to land. When at the appropriate altitude, we will accelerate away from Mun's surface in order to land at a reasonably low velocity in order to make sure our rocket remains intact and that our pilot Bob stays safe. Illustrations: Launch Report and Debrief Launch Time: 10:31 A.M. Team Members Present: Chris VanKerkhove, Nathan Stack, Jeremy Walther Play-by-Play: The rocket left the launch path, accelerating vertically until an altitude of 120,000 km was achieved. At that point, our thruster was decoupled. We then angled towards the horizon, eventually rising to a level at which a parabolic arc path was achieved. We successfully exited Kerbin's atmosphere and accelerated towards the Mun. Once we got to Mun, we successfully orbited Mun, considering an attempt to land on Mun; however, the attempt was too dangerous as our fuel levels were too low. We then exited orbit by thrusting in the direction of Kerbin, our pilot ejected his parachute when at the appropriate altitude, and landed safely. We returned Bob Kerban safely to Kerbal. His family dearly missed him and they're happy he's home safe. Photographs: Time-of-Flight: 19 minutes. Summary: We achieved all of our desired milestones, indicated in the pre-launch debrief. Opportunities / Learnings: Our team learned of the importance of heat shields, as our rocket very nearly began to overheat. We also learned how to more successfully maneuver in order to achieve orbit, which has been a source of difficulty for us. Although we thought we had learned from previous launches to make sure that we had enough fuel to achieve our desired milestones, in this launch we did not. We need to more thoughtfully calculate how much fuel we will need in the future. Strategies / Project Timeline: Going forward, we recognize the need to experiment with different engines and command pods in order to try new things to achieve more difficult milestones. We also need to create a pilot plan in greater detail in order to more efficiently and effectively achieve our milestones. The pilot plan of this launch was better and had more detail than previous launches; however, the pilot plan can still be improved. Milestone Awards Presented: Orbiting Mun (+ safe return) - $200,000 Available Funds: $299,018 - $17,262 + $200,000 = $481,756
  18. Pre-Launch Design Release Team Name: Nicholas Enterprises Available Funds: $475,278 Vehicle Name: Mr. Rocket Vehicle Parts List and Cost: Twin boar x2, MK3 Fuselodge x1, Rhino Engine x1, AVT-1 Winglet x1, Rockomax Decoupler x1, Airstream Protective Shell x1, TR-18 Stack Decoupler x2, Terrier Fuel Engine x1, F1-T 400 Tank, RC 0015 RGU x1, MK-1 Command Pod x1, SPL solar panel x2, MK16 Parachute x1, LT-1 Landing Struts x3, MK-7 Nose Cones x2, Launch Stability Enhancers x2, and Radial Decouplers x2. Total cost = $82,090 Design Goals: Our vehicle is designed to venture to Duna and plant a memorial flag in memory of Valentina Kermin. Launch Goal: We plan to accomplish this mission and milestones for landing on Duna. We also hope to receive a 100% for this project by planting a flag on Duna. Pilot Plan: We will launch from the platform and initially head straight up into the air. A maneuver is expected to be used to obtain orbit around Kerbin. At about 70,000 meters, this maneuver will be made to get orbit. After obtaining orbit, we will create another maneuver so that we have an encounter with Duna's orbit. We will gain orbit around Duna. Then we will do another maneuver so that Duna can pull in our rocket so that we can land on Duna. After landing we will exit the ship and place a memorial flag on Duna for Valentina.
  19. Valentina Kermin Valentina was a brave astronaut She ventured to Mun, Minmus, Duna Could her bravery be matched? No it could not Her favorite midnight snack was tuna We miss you so dearly, Valentina She ventured out into the unknown Her spacecraft moved faster than a cheetah Sadly she blew up all alone She designed her ship for success Even including mystery goo By her talent we were all impressed When she passed we all said boo Valentina, you will be greatly missed We're glad you died still not a communist
  20. Following the death of poor Valentina Kerman on Duna, Nicholas Enterprises has had a lien placed against all future rocket purchases. This lien will be lifted when a full eulogy for Valentina is published in this forum. This eulogy must follow the strict format of an English sonnet (see details here: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixed_verse )
  21. Definitely worth doing a bit of research on orbital maneuvering and how to dock... it's not particularly straightforward.
  22. Looks like you're making progress, but hopefully your pilot doesn't have to test out his parachute next time. Looks like you're having some trouble embedding pictures... please see me or one of your classmates for the next mission reports so we can see a visual record of your triumphs!
  23. Fantastic work. That's quite an accomplishment. Are you headed to Mun or another stellar object next?
  24. Congrats on your first working satellite! Looking good...
  25. What is your desired orbital radius? Good luck!
  26. Charon Refueler Pre-Flight Available Funds: $376,539 Vehicle Parts List: 1 Clamp-O-Tron Shielded Docking Port ($400) 1 FL-T200 Fuel Tank ($275) 1 FL-T400 Fuel Tank ($500) 1 FL-T800 Fuel Tank ($800) 1 Z-1k Rechargeable Battery Bank ($880) 1 RC-001S Remote Guidance Unit ($2250) 1 Advanced Inline Stabilizer ($1200) 1 TR-18A Stack Decoupler ($400) 1 C7 Brand Adapter - 2.5 m to 1.25 m ($800) 1 Rockomax Jumbo 64 Fuel Tank ($5750) 1 RE-15 "Skipper" Liquid Fuel Engine ($5300) 4 TT-38K Radial Decoupler ($600) 4 BACC "Thumper" Solid Fuel Booster ($850) 4 Aerodynamic Nose Cone ($240) 4 Standard Canard ($720) 4 EAS-4 Strut Connector ($42) 4 RV-105 RCS Thruster Block ($620) 2 Stratus-V Roundified Monopropellant Tank ($200) 2 OX-4W 3x2 Photovoltaic Panels ($380) Design Goals: The Charon Refueler Rocket is designed with the sole purpose of providing the precise amount fuel needed to refuel the Kerbinational Space Station. With four solid fuel booster meant for exiting the atmosphere, and one orange liquid fuel tank, our hope is that this will allow the Charon to dock with and refuel the KSS. Launch Goals: Our goal is for the Charon Refueler will be able to both dock with and fully refuel the Kerbinational Space Station, providing approximately $1,000,000 in funds. With these funds, we aim to design a rocket that can land on either the mun or minmus and safely return. Pilot Plan: Use the solid rocket boosters to gain altitude, and then jettison them once empty. Stage 2 will be used for circularization as well as the rendezvous with the KSS. Once it's out of fuel, it will be jettisoned and the RCS will be used to maneuver for docking.
  27. Pre-Launch Design Release Team Name: StackBNimble Corp. Available Funds: $50,000 Vehicle Name: Stud Vehicle Parts List and Cost: Command Pod Mk 1: ($600) Parachute Mk16: ($422) 18A Stack Decoupler X2: ($800) Fuel Tank FL-T400 x3: ($1500) Swivel Liquid Fuel Engine x2: ($2400) Radiator Panels x2: ($300) Radial Decoupler TT-38K x4: ($2400) RT-10 Solid Fuel Booster x4: ($1600) Aerodynamic Nose Cone x4: ($960) Total: $10,982 Design Goals: Our satellite is designed to possess maximum thrusting power in order to leave Kerbin's atmosphere and achieve stable orbit. Launch Goal: In this launch, we hoped to achieve the following milestones: First working satellite placed in stable orbit - $80,000 Pilot Plan: We will use the SAS system to help us stay on track in getting into orbit. Our plan is to fly vertically upward, then rotate our rocket to about 65 degrees, then decouple our thruster when out of fuel. We will attempt to achieve a parabolic arc path. Once we have reached a certain altitude, we will accelerate to the horizon until stable orbit is achieved. Illustrations: Launch Report and Debrief Launch Time: 10:38 A.M. Team Members Present: Chris VanKerkhove, Nathan Stack, Jeremy Walther Play-by-Play: The rocket left the launch path, accelerating vertically until an altitude of 80,000 km was achieved. At that point, our thruster was decoupled. We then angled towards the horizon, eventually rising to a level at which a parabolic arc path was achieved. We successfully achieved orbit. After achieving orbit, we attempted our first Kerbal EVA, which was successful. We then exited orbit by thrusting in the direction of Kerbin, and were worried as our pilot had to eject and deploy his parachute. He did land safely, however. Photographs: . Time-of-Flight: 14 minutes. Summary: We achieved all of our desired milestones, indicated in the pre-launch debrief. Opportunities / Learnings: Our team learned of the importance of heat shields, as our rocket very nearly began to overheat. We also learned how to more successfully maneuver in order to achieve orbit, which has been a source of difficulty for us. We also learned from previous launches to make sure that we had enough fuel to achieve our desired milestones, and we did. Strategies / Project Timeline: Going forward, we recognize the need to experiment with different engines and command pods in order to try new things to achieve more difficult milestones. We also need to create a pilot plan in greater detail in order to more efficiently and effectively achieve our milestones. Milestone Awards Presented: First working satellite placed in stable orbit - $80,000 Available Funds: $230,000 - $10,982 + $80,000 = $299,018
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