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Showing blog entries posted in for the last 365 days.

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  1. Last week
  2. Superionic Ice

    Water and ice molecules on earth have a distinct molecular structure that gives it the properties that it has; however, under different surrounding pressures, the molecular structure can change, resulting in the formation of superionic water. Superionic water differs from the ice/water you and I know so well. "Regular" ice has molecules that form a V shape with two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. As pressure increases, these atoms get squeezed into different shapes. A property that superionic ice has is that it is a conductor of electricity; however, unlike most conductors, the current is carried by positively charged ions instead of negatively charged electrons. This substance was just a theoretical idea until recently when the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser tested the theory and was successful in creating superionic ice. They knew this was a success because the molecules were able to conduct electricity. Due to the opaque color of the molecules when electricity was ran through it, it was determined that it was, in fact superionic. If it had a shiny look to it, the researchers would have known that it couldn't of been superinoinc because that would mean that negative electrons were carrying the current. The pressures that were applied to the ice by the laser were almost 2 million times the atmospheric pressure of earth. This is the amount of pressure that planets Neptune and Uranus have.
  3. Failure is Necessary for Growth

    Time for a little mental health rant… We all want our children to be the best they can be, to feel good about themselves, and to reach their potential. Part of this process, however, involves learning to fail productively — understanding and experiencing what it’s like to fall short, knowing that sick feeling in your gut is uncomfortable but necessary, and disliking that feeling enough to do something about it and try again. I sure hope I’m wrong, but I feel like many of the changes I’m seeing in the way we as a society deal with children is sending the wrong message. These changes are made with the best of intentions — we don’t want anyone to feel left out, and we don’t want children to experience the pain of failure — but we as adults who know better need to recognize that these uncomfortable experiences are important to building up confidence, self esteem, and independence. Kudos that aren’t truly earned don’t teach a child to work hard, they teach a child that showing up is enough. I’m not saying little ones need to be beaten into submission, or that I should always crush my kid in a game of Connect Four — but I do think they need to learn that they can’t win every time, otherwise there’s no impetus to improve. They won’t always get picked first to be on a team, there will be days when they are left out of activities their friends get to experience, and there will be events when they’ll leave the field and not be the winner of the event. This is OK, it’s an opportunity learn the importance of giving your all, of preparing as fully as possible, and the value of sportsmanship, both on top and at the bottom of the podium. I think it’s also important for our kids to understand what makes us proud and what is disappointing. Sportsmanship is important, but it’s also important to realize that decisions leading up to events contribute to the success or failure of that event. As a teacher I observe students who work their tail off and struggle for a middling grade… and I try to instill a sense of pride in that work and that grade. I also have students who slack off and are naturally talented enough to earn A’s. I try to explain to these students that they are not reaching their potential, and I don’t find that acceptable. There will be times when our kids may try and try and try, but never reach the level of success that they desire. Recently I’ve dealt with repeated instances of academic dishonesty, from students who are taking shortcuts in their classes, and aren’t recognizing the connection between their integrity, work ethic, and results. True self esteem and confidence comes from understanding that you can go to bed every night with no regrets, having given your all, not from an external source such as a trophy or a piece of paper with a letter on it. And not meeting every goal just tells you that you’ve set aggressive goals. If you reach every one of your goals, you’re not reaching high enough. I don’t think it’s valuable to get into specifics, as you can find “opportunity for improvement” in so many of the things we do and say with our kids, from the toddlers to the older young-at-heart — in our homes, in our schools, and in our activities. But I would ask, if some of this does resonate with you, to take a step back and look at what changes you can make, or ways you can support and reinforce those who are instilling these old-fashioned values. And don’t be afraid to speak up every now and then and question what you see occurring. Just because someone thinks it’ll make everyone feel better, doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. And just like our mothers taught us, popular opinion doesn’t mean it’s the right opinion. Remember the old adage “if all your friends jumped off a bridge would you jump off too?” It’s time for all of us to start thinking for ourselves. The post Failure is Necessary for Growth appeared first on Physics In Flux.
  4. Singing Glasses

    Last weekend at an honors interview at Roberts, I got to take a look in some of their physics labs. they had some fun things set up for us to check out. One thing was in a section called "physics and music". Sounds perfect for me, right? They had a bunch of wine glasses filled with different amounts of water. When you dipped your finger in some water and rubbed it around the edge of the glass, a specific note could be heard. However, if your finger isn't wet, it doesn't work. Why? Turns out, it is because there is too much friction between the finger and the glass when the finger is dry. When the finger is wet, there is minimal friction, which allows the glass to vibrate, which produces the note. The amount of water in the glass determines how high or low pitched the note is. If you try this experiment, try placing a ping pong ball in the glass. The ping pong ball will make the vibrations visible because it will move on top of the water as the glass vibrates.
  5. The symbol of invention, ingenuity and enlightenment, the light bulb is perhaps a most pivotal invention in the course of human history. The advent of the lamp made it possible to render the dark of night and shed a lambency on the way to the future! Truly, the light bulb is all we could ever ask for. They say 'teach a man to fish and he will not have light but teach a man of the fluorescent lamp and he will have that light!' but in all seriousness let us illuminate the obscure nature of the fluorescent light! Different varieties of the fluorescent light may use cathodes of tungsten that release heat and electrons while being electrically heated itself and this provides the energy needed to produce the 'lighting' effects.As I have said once before in my previous blog about atomic energy levels and their associated light spectra, it was a consummation of this knowledge that we make an effective application of phenomena. A electric current passes through the mercury gas, exciting its electrons and emits high energy light as they descend to ground level. That energetic lights strikes a phosphorescent or fluorescent salt, the white powder inside the glass tube, which emits light itself. A mixture of noble gases which ionize as a result of the heat being generated by the cathodes, allowing sufficient current to excite the gaseous mercury. All these components make for an expensive assembly and their complexities make them a challenge to manufacture which results in a unattractive price. However they are known to be many times more efficient than their incandescent cousins, saving money and electricity in the long term. Fluorescent bulbs are also a environment friendly choice, while containing mercury, the construction of incandescent lamps actually produce more mercury waste.
  6. Escape Velocity and Black Holes

    Every massive object in space has an escape velocity. Escape velocity is the minimum velocity an object must have in order to escape the gravitational strength of a particular planet or any large body in space. The earths escape velocity is about 11.2 km/s. This means that an object must travel 11.2 km/s to escape its orbit around the earth. Reaching this velocity is a very big challenge when dealing with space travel. The more mass a body has, the more gravitational attraction it has; therefore, the escape velocity becomes faster. A black hole's escape velocity is so high that nothing can escape its gravitational pull; not even light. That is why its call a "black" hole: there is no light coming out of it so you can't see in it. A black holes escape velocity must be greater than 300,000 km/s (the speed of light). How can in object have this must mass to generate this much gravitation? When a star reaches the end of its life, some of them collapse all the way down to a single point, maintaining it's mass. This means that it becomes infinitely dense. Our sun does not have the potential to eventually become a black hole because it is too small. Stars that become black holes are 20 times the mass of the sun.
  7. Earlier
  8. Luge

    I have never heard of the word "luge" until today when looking at events in the Winter Olympics. Luge is a sport where there is a rider on a sled that is sliding down ice feet first. The objective is to get down the track in the fastest amount of time. They often look like this while racing... The rider has to fight air resistance to get down the track as fast as possible. They start at the top of an ramp and then have to go around turns until they reach the finish line. Although this may not seem like a dangerous sport, riders can reach speeds of 95 mph or more. In the 2010 Winter Olympics, rider Nodar Kumaritashvili died in a practice run hours before the opening ceremony. Because of his high speed, he flew off his sled into the air and hit a metal pole. Due to his death, track designers for the 2014 Winter Olympics designed a track that went uphill in some areas which would force riders into slower speeds. Riders rely on gravity and proper turn times to reach the finish line the fastest. Until next time, RK
  9. What makes an Element?

    My favorite bond is the bond between friends!
  10. The Leyden Jar

    @BrandyBoy72 Yo I think I messed this one up so bad. It was nice knowing you, sorry I could not help you more. My only regret is not being a good person. Farewell, walk free...
  11. Physics Behind a Fly Fishing Cast

    Wow they turned RPG fishing into a real thing!
  12. Bend it like Beckham

    @krdavis18 You are the physics duchess!
  13. Viscosity

    You prefer Waffles over pancakes?
  14. Recycling Rockets

    NASA wanted their space shuttle program to be completely reusable. Sadly, due to budget cuts, only the actual shuttle was reusable, and the boosters were ditched. On the other hand, Space X wanted to save as much money and as many resources as they could. On the right is a picture of Space X's Falcon Heavy rocket, designed to, as the name suggests, lift a large payload into space, and on the plus side, at a much cheaper cost than before. On the left is a clip of the two "small" side boosters landing simultaneously after the Falcon Heavy's test flight yesterday. Sadly, the main booster missed the landing barge in the ocean and was lost. By saving the boosters, we can save a lot of money and time that would be spent into making new ones for every launch. Also, if you didn't know, the Falcon Heavy was carrying Elon Musk's personal car, a Tesla Roadster. They put a dummy in a space suit in the driver's seat, put "Don't Panic" on the display, and the radio, even though you can't hear it, is playing "Space Oddity." Or "Rocket Man." I don't remember. If you want to check out more, here's the link to SpaceX's livestream, which also has the videos of the test flight, and a simulation of the test flight which are pretty cool. http://www.spacex.com/webcast
  15. SpaceX

    He's not. Like a cult, Elon Musk makes false promises to followers and he gets grants from our government for doing nothing. Render this illusion and seek what is yours, the truth.
  16. Super Bowl LII

    Super Bowl LII is nearly 2 hours away. The Patriots and the Eagles are both great teams with lots of talent. Not only will I be watching the game, but the physics of the game as well, being a physics student. Some things worth taking note of are the kinematics of kicking a field goal, the forces that are felt while getting tackled, the kinematics of deep passes made by Tom Brady and/or Nick Foles, among many others. The minimum height needed to complete a successful field goal is 10 feet. A typical field goal is kicked anywhere from 30 - 40 yards away from the goal post. Depending on how windy it is will determine the correct angle and velocity at which the ball should be kicked. Lineman can weigh up to 300 pounds, so running into them is not fun for running backs. When the defensive lineman start to charge over the line of scrimmage they posses a tremendous amount of momentum. While running backs also have the ability to reach a great amount of momentum due to there ability to reach very high speeds, they don't have the mass to match the linemen. Also when running backs come in contact with lineman it is usually at or behind the line of scrimmage, not allowing them to pick up a high speed to match the momentum of the large linemen. There is more than just throwing a ball up in the air really far when quarterbacks toss those amazing 60- 70 yard completions near the out of bounds line. Quarterbacks have to time it perfectly so the ball reaches the target at the same time the wide receiver arrives at the point where the catch is made. A successful completion all depends on the speed of the wide receiver and the trajectory at which the quarterback throws the ball into the air. Hopefully Super Bowl LII brings us lots of cool physics to observe.
  17. Will Physics Pay Off?

    So, most of us in Physics C have reached a point where we start to think about college and how this class is going to help us in the future. From what I have heard, most of us in this class plan on going into something that relates to physics in some way whether it be engineering or just a normal physics major. In the classroom, there is a poster that has the 10-Best Paying Majors on it which sparked my idea for this post. In other math and science classrooms you can see posters like this one that try to keep people involved in these classes. STEM classes have components that are in the top paying jobs overall. More recent information says that the order of top paying jobs include a lot of engineering which includes a lot of physics. 10. Geological and geophysical engineering 9. Computer engineering 8. Mechanical engineering 7. Aerospace engineering 6. Electrical engineering 5. Chemical engineering 4. Mining and mineral engineering 3. Metallurgical engineering 2. Pharmaceutical sciences and administration 1. Petroleum engineering As I think about how hard this class has become, I realize that it will somehow help me in the future even if it just for the challenge of it. Until next time, RK
  18. Nice post HegelBot153. If you wear flannel pajamas and have flannel sheets, rolling over under the covers can be an 'enlightening' experience as well!
  19. Green

    Mantis Shrimp can see many more colors than us. STAY WOKE.
  20. Hacky Sack

    But what odes this have to do with physics?
  21. "Semester Review"

    Wow. I appreciate the honesty. I vibe.
  22. Second Quarter

    Why does it seem like the first half of the year literally flew by so fast?
  23. Quarter 2

    I haven't heard from any of my colleges yet
  24. Wisdom Teeth

    I recently had my wisdom teeth removed, and it wasn't even the worst experience of my life, all thanks to the Novocain. My face was completely numb, couldn't feel a thing. It's not like I couldn't feel any forces though: I could tell that my cheek was being pulled to one side because my hole head felt the force of the pull, but I could not feel anything touching my cheek, an odd experience. And after the surgery I was touching my face a lot because touching your own face when it is numb is a very weird sensation, hard to describe. And this got me to realize that when something touches you, sometimes it is only sensory, without any feeling you wouldn't even feel the force. So I then thought: if you had no feeling in you at all, would you not know if you were being pushed? What let's you know that you are falling, I think there's something to do with your inner ear or something, but otherwise what? your sight of course. This is an interesting direction to take this in... So if you ever wondered what those blocks in physics problems feel on the daily, just imagine that you have no feeling anywhere in your body, no sight, no sense of anything and you're being pulled by some weird floating rope or sliding down a frictionless incline, how does that even happen anyways?
  25. The Many World Theory

    I've read about this before! It's shocking to actually think about if it were true.
  26. Why do Bananas Have a Curve?

    Survival of the fittest- banana version. Love me some bananas!
  27. The Slow Mo Guys

    I think I've watched every video they've made. Glad to find a fellow SlowMoGuys-watcher!
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