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  2. Calculus based review of work done by constant and non-constant forces, Hooke’s Law, Work and Energy equations in isolated and non-isolated systems, kinetic energy, gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, conservative vs. nonconservative forces, conservation of mechanical energy, power, neutral, stable, and unstable equilibrium. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Work done by a constant force 2:25 Work done by a non-constant force 3:58 Force of a Spring (Hooke’s Law) 4:52 Calculating the work done by the force of a spring 6:26 Net work equals change in kinetic energy 7:02 Gravitational Potential Energy 7:50 Non-isolated systems work and energy 8:29 Isolated systems work and energy 9:02 Conservative vs. Nonconservative forces 10:10 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 10:45 Power 12:09 Every derivative can be an integral 13:00 Conservative forces and potential energy 13:46 Deriving Hooke’s Law from elastic potential energy 14:22 Deriving the force of gravity from gravitational potential energy 15:17 Neutral, stable, and unstable equilibrium Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Dynamics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control help.
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  4. Calculus based review of Newton’s three laws, basic forces in dynamics such as the force of gravity, force normal, force of tension, force applied, force of friction, free body diagrams, translational equilibrium, the drag or resistive force and terminal velocity. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:18 Newton’s First Law 1:30 Newton’s Second Law 1:55 Newton’s Third Law 2:29 Force of Gravity 3:36 Force Normal 3:58 Force of Tension 4:24 Force Applied 4:33 Force of Friction 5:46 Static Friction 6:17 Kinetic Friction 6:33 The Coefficient of Friction 7:26 Free Body Diagrams 10:41 Translational equilibrium 11:41 Drag Force or Resistive Force 13:25 Terminal Velocity Next Video: AP Physics C: Work, Energy, and Power Review (Mechanics) Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control help.
  5. Review of conversions, velocity, acceleration, instantaneous and average velocity and acceleration, uniformly accelerated motion, free fall and free fall graphs, component vectors, vector addition, unit vectors, relative velocity and projectile motion. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Introductory Concepts 2:07 Velocity and Acceleration 3:03 Uniformly Accelerated Motion 6:51 Free Fall 7:45 Free Fall Graphs 9:16 Component Vectors 10:58 Unit Vectors 13:09 Relative Velocity 13:51 Projectile Motion Next Video: AP Physics C: Dynamics Review (Mechanics) Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Websitel Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Jen Larsen, Scott Carter, Natasha Trousdale and Aarti Sangwan
  6. A 28.8 g yellow air hockey disc elastically strikes a 26.9 g stationary red air hockey disc. If the velocity of the yellow disc before the collision is 33.6 cm/s in the x direction and after the collision it is 10.7 cm/s at an angle 63.4° S of E, what is the velocity of the red disc after the collision? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 The problem 1:49 Breaking the initial velocity of disc 1 into its components 3:06 Conservation of momentum in the x-direction 5:24 Conservation of momentum in the y-direction 6:26 Solving for the final velocity of disc 2 using its components 8:40 Was this an elastic collision? 12:39 Movie Character Day! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen "Nombre de los vientos". Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons -
  7. Version 1.0.1

    The AP* Physics C Companion - Mechanics is an easy-to-read companion to the AP Physics C: Mechanics curriculum, featuring 350 sample problems with fully worked-out solutions. The AP Physics C Companion: Mechanics covers all major topics of the AP Physics C Mechanics course, including fundamentals of calculus, kinematics, dynamics, work, energy, momentum, rotation, oscillations, and gravity. The AP Physics C Companion is not a textbook replacement nor is it a strict test-prep guide. It is a short, sweet roadmap to calculus-based physics courses such as AP Physics C: Mechanics and University Physics I, invaluable not just during test prep time, but throughout the entire course. The book lays out basic physics principles as quickly and clearly as possible, then demonstrates their application with hundreds of example problems solved in detail. Written by a physics teacher, The AP Physics C Companion correlates directly with the APlusPhysics.com website, where you will find free video mini-lessonsexplaining fundamental concepts, detailed study guides, a question and answer discussion board, and most importantly, a meeting place where you can interact with other students from around the world. This is a license for a digital download of the PDF version for use by one person only on up to five electronic devices. This document may not be printed, edited, re-distributed, re-sold, or licensed to any other user. Once the file has been downloaded no refunds will be given.

    $10.00

  8. By the time students learn about all the equations for mechanical energy, momentum, impulse and impact force, they often start to confuse the equations with one another. This is a straightforward, simple look at all of those equations and when to use them. This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:14 Tacky Sweater Day! 0:22 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 0:54 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:30 Net Work equals change in Kinetic Energy 3:01 Conservation of Momentum does NOT require the work due to friction to be zero 3:28 The initial and final points when dealing with momentum are predetermined 3:56 Impulse does not equal Impact Force Thank you to Sophie Jones and her family for letting me use six of their sweaters in this video! Next Video: 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  9. Episode 12. The Millikan Experiment: A dramatic recreation of Millikan's classic oil-drop experiment to determine the charge of a single electron.“The Mechanical Universe,” is a critically-acclaimed series of 52 thirty-minute videos covering the basic topics of an introductory university physics course.Each program in the series opens and closes with Caltech Professor David Goodstein providing philosophical, historical and often humorous insight into the subject at hand while lecturing to his freshman physics class. The series contains hundreds of computer animation segments, created by Dr. James F. Blinn, as the primary tool of instruction. Dynamic location footage and historical re-creations are also used to stress the fact that science is a human endeavor. The series was originally produced as a broadcast telecourse in 1985 by Caltech and Intelecom, Inc. with program funding from the Annenberg/CPB Project.The online version of the series is sponsored by the Information Science and Technology initiative at Caltech. http://ist.caltech.edu©1985 California Institute of Technology, The Corporation for Community College Television, and The Annenberg/CPB Project
  10. A racquetball is dropped on to three different substances from the same height above each: water, soil, and wood. Rank the _______ during the collision with each substance in order from least to most. (a) Impulse. (b) Average Force of Impact. (Assume the racquetball stops during the collision with the water and soil.) This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Prom Dress Day! 0:20 The three demonstrations 0:32 The problem 1:43 The equation for Impulse and Impact Force 2:02 Understanding the two parts to the demonstrations 3:33 Part (a): Impulse [water and soil] 4:47 Part (a): Impulse [wood] 5:23 Part (b): Impact Force [water and soil] 6:27 Part (b): Impact Force [wood] 7:59 The Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project Thank you to Jan Wery and Judi Lintott of the Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project: “Find your dream dress for less than $25." Next Video: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  11. A 66 g beanbag is dropped and stops upon impact with the ground. If the impulse measured during the collision is 0.33 N·s, from what height above the ground was the beanbag dropped? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Superhero Day! 0:56 The problem 1:39 Splitting the problem in to two parts 2:32 Using Impulse for part 2 3:30 Using Conservation of Energy for part 1 4:45 What went wrong? Next Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Thanks to Adam Herz for letting me borrow a VHS copy of our high school video yearbook which he was instrumental in the creating of. Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke and Jennifer Larsen
  12. Two kids walk through the woods discussing momentum. I mean, who wouldn’t? Okay, fine. It’s a basic introduction to the concept of momentum. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Next Video: Force of Impact Equation Derivation http://www.flippingphysics.com/impact-force.html Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Instantaneous Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Please support me on Patreon! Please consider becoming a Flipping Physics Quality Control helper.
  13. An important review highlighting differences between the equations for Conservation of Momentum, Impact Force and Impulse. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:17 Conservation of Momentum 1:01 An explosion is a collision in reverse 1:22 Impact Force 1:39 Impulse 2:16 Impulse equals 3 things 2:53 How many objects are in these equations? A big THANK YOU to Elle Konrad who let me borrow several of her old dance costumes! Next Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  14. Demonstrating and measuring how a helmet changes impulse, impact force and change in time during a collision. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:21 The demonstration without a helmet 1:15 The equation for Impulse 1:55 How a helmet should affect the variables 2:36 The demonstration with a helmet 3:29 Comparing with and without a helmet Next Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter, and Jennifer Larsen
  15. Demonstrating, measuring and showing Impulse is Area Under the Force vs. Time Curve. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:09 Deriving the Impulse Equation using algebra 0:47 Deriving the Impulse Equation using calculus 2:08 The demonstration 2:42 Illustrating “area under the curve” Next Video: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Elastic Collision Problem Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter, and Jennifer Larsen
  16. An elastic collision is demonstrated and analyzed. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. A big thank you to Mr. Becke for being a guest in today’s video! Content Times: 0:25 Reading and translating the problem 1:17 The demonstration 1:52 Solving for velocity final of cart 2 3:46 Measuring the velocity final of cart 2 4:25 Checking if kinetic energy is conserved 6:22 We should have converted to meters per second Next Video: Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Perfectly Inelastic Collision Problem Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke and Jennifer Larsen
  17. A perfectly inelastic collision is demonstrated and analyzed. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:08 Demonstrating the Perfectly Inelastic Collision 0:41 Known values 1:34 Using Conservation of Momentum 2:22 Both objects have the same final velocity 3:37 Measuring the final velocity 4:05 Determining the relative error 4:45 Fruit Day! Next Video: Introductory Elastic Collision Problem Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introduction to Elastic and Inelastic Collisions Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Controllers: Christopher Becke Scott Carter
  18. Learn about Elastic, Inelastic and Perfectly Inelastic collisions via a demonstration Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:15 The charities 1:05 Elastic collisions 2:09 Inelastic collisions 3:29 Perfectly Inelastic collisions 4:13 Demonstration #1 5:28 Demonstration #2 Next Video: Introductory Perfectly Inelastic Collision Problem Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Conservation of Momentum Explosion Problem Demonstration The Charities: Children With Hair Loss Alpha House Home Of New Vision American Foundation for Suicide Prevention Please support me on Patreon!
  19. Now that we have learned about conservation of momentum, let’s apply what we have learned to an “explosion”. Okay, it’s really just the nerd-a-pult launching a ball while on momentum carts. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:38 The demonstration 1:16 The known values 2:07 Solving the problem using conservation of momentum 4:00 Measuring the final velocity of the nerd-a-pult 4:39 Determining relative error 5:09 What happens with a less massive projectile? Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introduction to Conservation of Momentum with Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon!
  20. Demonstrations of and Introduction to Conservation of Momentum Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:10 Deriving Conservation of Momentum 1:33 Demonstrating Conservation of Momentum 1:53 Analyzing the demonstration 3:29 How a rocket works Next Video: Introductory Conservation of Momentum Explosion Problem Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: How to Wear A Helmet - A PSA from Flipping Physics Please support me on Patreon!
  21. Know when and how to use the “Impulse Approximation”. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:12 Reviewing the examples 0:43 Defining Impulse Approximation 1:41 Determining the forces during the collision 2:27 Solving for the Force Normal (or Force of Impact) 3:12 Determining our error Next Video: How to Wear A Helmet - A PSA from Flipping Physics Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Impulse Introduction or If You Don't Bend Your Knees When Stepping off a Wall Please support me on Patreon!
  22. Now mr.p doesn’t bend his knees when stepping off a wall. What is the new force of impact? Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:18 How much does mr.p bend his knees? 1:00 Reviewing the previous problem 1:57 What changes if I don’t bend my knees? 2:41 Impulse introduction 3:36 The impulse during this collision 4:51 Why is it bad to not bend your knees? 5:22 Estimating time of collision if I don’t bend my knees 6:09 Solving for the force of impact 6:51 Review 7:28 No tomatoes were wasted in the making of this video Next Video: Proving and Explaining Impulse Approximation Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Calculating the Force of Impact when Stepping off a Wall Please support me on Patreon!
  23. A 73 kg mr.p steps off a 73.2 cm high wall. If mr.p bends his knees such that he stops his downward motion and the time during the collision is 0.28 seconds, what is the force of impact caused by the ground on mr.p? Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:21 Translating the problem 1:32 Splitting the problem into parts 3:07 Substituting in known variables 4:30 Finding the final velocity for part 1 6:21 Substituting back into Force of Impact equation 7:23 Converting to pounds Next Video: Impulse Introduction or If You Don't Bend Your Knees When Stepping off a Wall Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Instantaneous Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Please support me on Patreon! A big thank you to Jean Gifford for donating the money for Bo and Billy’s bathrobes!
  24. Rearranging Newton’s Second Law to derive the force of impact equation. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:09 Newton’s Second Law 1:57 The Force of Impact equation 2:33 The paradigm shift Next Video: Calculating the Force of Impact when Stepping off a Wall Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: You Can't Run From Momentum! (a momentum introduction) Please support me on Patreon!
  25. A vehicle uniformly accelerates from rest to 3.0 x 10^1 km/hr in 9.25 seconds and 42 meters. Determine the average drag force acting on the vehicle. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics C Topic. Content Times: 0:14 The Drag Force equation 0:39 The density of air 1:33 The drag coefficient 1:59 The cross sectional area 3:11 Determining instantaneous speed 4:08 Instantaneous Drag Force 4:36 Graphing Drag Force as a function of Time 5:17 The definite integral of drag force with respect to time 5:42 Average Drag Force times Total Change in Time Next Video: Instantaneous Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Average Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Please support me on Patreon!
  26. A Toyota Prius is traveling at a constant velocity of 113 km/hr. If an average force of drag of 3.0 x 10^2 N acts on the car, what is the power developed by the engine in horsepower? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:15 The problem 1:18 Which equation to use and why 2:20 Billy solves the problem 3:59 What if the car is moving at 129 km/hr? Next Video: You Can't Run From Momentum! (a momentum introduction) Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Average Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Please support me on Patreon!
  27. Billy analyzes ABS brakes to show the difference between Rolling without Slipping and Rolling with Slipping. He also answers the question in the title of the video, but why would I write that in the description? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:17 ABS Brakes 0:40 Demonstrating Rolling without Slipping and Rolling with Slipping 1:36 How ABS Brakes work 2:18 Analyzing a car tire 3:34 The calculations Next Video: Everybody Brought Mass to the Party! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Does the Book Move? An Introductory Friction Problem Please support me on Patreon!
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