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  2. Cartesian and polar coordinates are introduced and how to switch from one to the other is derived. The concept of angular displacement and arc length are demonstrated. Circumference is shown to be an arc length. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:10 Cartesian coordinates and circular motion 1:00 Polar coordinates and circular motion 1:40 Switching between polar and Cartesian coordinates 2:18 Introduction to Angular Displacement and Arc Length 3:24 The Arc Length equation 4:13 Circumference and Arc Length Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  3. Earlier
  4. Calculus based review of equations I suggest you memorize for the AP Physics C: Mechanics Exam. Please realize I abhor memorization, however, there are a few equations which I do recommend you memorize. I also list equations NOT to memorize and ones which I suggest you know how to derive. Also a note about Moments of Inertia and the AP Exam. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:22 Equations to Memorize 2:06 Derivative as an Integral Example 6:52 Equations NOT to memorize 8:10 Equations to know how to derive 10:14 Moments of Inertia and the AP Exam Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Simple Harmonic Motion Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Sawdog, Romail Pervez Bhatti, and Lisa Greene for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  5. Calculus based review of Simple Harmonic Motion (SHM). SHM is defined. A horizontal mass-spring system is analyzed and proven to be in SHM and it’s period is derived. The difference between frequency and angular frequency is shown. The equations and graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration as a function of time are analyzed. the phase constant Phi is explained. And Conservation of Mechanical Energy in SHM is discussed. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Defining simple harmonic motion (SHM) 0:53 Analyzing the horizontal mass-spring system 2:26 Proving a horizontal mass-spring system is in SHM 3:38 Solving for the period of a mass-spring system in SHM 4:39 Are frequency and angular frequency the same thing? 5:16 Position as a function of time in SHM 5:44 Explaining the phase constant Phi 6:19 Deriving velocity as a function of time in SHM 7:33 Deriving acceleration as a function of time in SHM 9:05 Understanding the graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration as a function of time in SHM 12:16 Conservation of Mechanical Energy in SHM Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Equations to Memorize (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Universal Gravitation Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video.
  6. Calculus based review of Universal Gravitation including Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation, solving for the acceleration due to gravity in a constant gravitational field, universal gravitational potential energy, graphing universal gravitational potential energy between an object and the Earth, three example problems (binding energy, escape velocity and orbital energy), and Kepler’s three laws. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:10 Newton’s Universal Law of Gravitation 1:52 Solving for the acceleration due to gravity 2:02 Universal Gravitational Potential Energy 4:52 Graph of Universal Gravitational Potential Energy between an object and the Earth 6:09 Binding Energy Example Problem 8:22 Escape Velocity Example Problem 9:54 Orbital Energy Example Problem 12:29 Kepler’s Three Laws 12:54 Kepler’s First Law 14:56 Kepler’s Second Law 15:25 Deriving Kepler’s Third Law Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Simple Harmonic Motion Review (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational vs. Linear Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Sawdog, and Frank Geshwind for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  7. Calculus based review and comparison of the linear and rotational equations which are in the AP Physics C mechanics curriculum. Topics include: displacement, velocity, acceleration, uniformly accelerated motion, uniformly angularly accelerated motion, mass, momentum of inertia, kinetic energy, Newton’s second law, force, torque, power, and momentum. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Displacement 038 Velocity 1:08 Acceleration 1:33 Uniformly Accelerated Motion 2:15 Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion 2:34 Mass 3:19 Kinetic Energy 3:44 Newton’s Second Law 4:18 Force and Torque 5:12 Power 5:45 Momentum Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Universal Gravitation Review (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 2 of 2 (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video.
  8. Calculus based review of the cross product torque equation, how to do a unit vector cross product problem, rotational equilibrium, the rotational form of Newton’s second law, the angular momentum of a particle and of a rigid object with shape, the derivation of conservation of angular momentum, and a conservation of angular momentum example problem which reviews a lot of the pieces necessary to understand conservation of angular momentum. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:15 The cross product torque equation 1:10 Unit vector cross product example problem 3:32 Rotational equilibrium definition 4:55 Rotational form of Newton’s second law 5:37 Angular momentum of a particle 7:08 Angular momentum of a rigid object with shape 7:49 Conservation of angular momentum derivation 8:57 Conservation of angular momentum example problem 10:57 Visualizing the problem 12:04 The conservation of angular momentum equation 12:54 Solving for the constant value of the variable y. 14:04 Substituting in known values 15:38 Does our variable answer make sense? Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Rotational vs. Linear Review (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 1 of 2 (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video.
  9. Calculus based review of moment of inertia for a system of particles and a rigid object with shape, the derivation of rotational kinetic energy, derivations of the following moments of inertia: Uniform Thin Hoop about is Cylindrical Axis, Uniform Rigid Rod about its Center of Mass and about one end, also the parallel axis theorem, torque, the rotational form of Newton’s Second Law, pulleys with mass and the force of tension, the Right Hand Rule for direction of torque, and rolling with and without slipping. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:10 Moment of Inertia of a system of particles derivation 1:46 Rotational Kinetic Energy derivation 2:49 Moment of Inertia of a rigid object with shape derivation 3:52 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Thin Hoop about its Cylindrical Axis derivation 5:31 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Rigid Rod about its Center of Mass derivation 8:02 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Rigid Rod about one end derivation 9:16 The Parallel Axis Theorem 11:29 Torque 12:21 Simple torque diagram 14:14 Rotational form of Newton’s Second Law 15:07 Pulleys with mass and the Force of Tension 15:33 The Right Hand Rule the for the direction of torque 16:56 Rolling without Slipping 17:40 Rolling with Slipping Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: Review of Rotational Dynamics for AP Physics C: Mechanics - Part 2 of 2 Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video.
  10. Calculus based review of instantaneous and average angular velocity and acceleration, uniformly angularly accelerated motion, arc length, the derivation of tangential velocity, the derivation of tangential acceleration, uniform circular motion, centripetal acceleration, centripetal force, non-uniform circular motion, and the derivation of the relationship between angular velocity and period. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:10 Instantaneous and Average Angular Velocity and Acceleration 1:14 Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion 2:16 Arc Length 3:22 Tangential Velocity Derivation 4:29 Tangential Acceleration Derivation 6:03 Uniform Circular Motion and Centripetal Acceleration 8:04 Centripetal Force 9:20 Non-Uniform Circular Motion 10:21 Angular Velocity and Period Relationship Derivation Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 1 of 2 (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Momentum, Impulse, Collisions and Center of Mass Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Natasha Trousdale, Aarti Sangwan, and Jen Larson for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  11. Calculus based review of conservation of momentum, the momentum version of Newton’s second law, the Impulse-Momentum Theorem, impulse approximation, impact force, elastic, inelastic and perfectly inelastic collisions, position, velocity and acceleration of the center of mass of a system of particles, center of mass of a rigid object with shape, and volumetric, surface and linear mass densities. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Momentum 0:38 Momentum and Newton’s Second Law 1:44 Conservation of Momentum 2:35 Impulse-Momentum Theorem 4:23 Impulse Approximation and Force of Impact 5:32 Elastic, Inelastic, and Perfectly Inelastic Collisions 6:39 Position of the Center of Mass of a System of Particles 7:19 Velocity of the Center of Mass of a System of Particles 7:54 Acceleration of the Center of Mass of a System of Particles 8:31 Center of Mass of a Rigid Object with Shape 10:09 Volumetric, Surface, and Linear Mass Density Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Integrals in Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Jordan Bueno, and Michael Nelson for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  12. Calculus based review of definite integrals, indefinite integrals, and derivatives as used in kinematics. Graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration as a function of time are compared using derivatives and integrals. Two of the uniformly accelerated motion (or kinematics) equations are derived using indefinite integrals. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Rearranging the acceleration equation to get change in velocity 1:41 Rearranging the velocity equation to get change in position 2:06 Comparing graphs of position, velocity, and acceleration as a function of time 3:28 Using the integral to solve for one of the uniformly accelerated motion equations 4:44 Using the integral to solve for a second uniformly accelerated motion equation FYI: I do not teach integrals until we get to Work. By then the students who are taking calculus concurrently with AP Physics C Mechanics have had enough experience with derivatives that they only freak out a little bit when I teach them integrals. Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Momentum, Impulse, Collisions and Center of Mass Review (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Work, Energy, and Power Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Mark Kramer and Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control team.
  13. Calculus based review of work done by constant and non-constant forces, Hooke’s Law, Work and Energy equations in isolated and non-isolated systems, kinetic energy, gravitational potential energy, elastic potential energy, conservative vs. nonconservative forces, conservation of mechanical energy, power, neutral, stable, and unstable equilibrium. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Work done by a constant force 2:25 Work done by a non-constant force 3:58 Force of a Spring (Hooke’s Law) 4:52 Calculating the work done by the force of a spring 6:26 Net work equals change in kinetic energy 7:02 Gravitational Potential Energy 7:50 Non-isolated systems work and energy 8:29 Isolated systems work and energy 9:02 Conservative vs. Nonconservative forces 10:10 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 10:45 Power 12:09 Every derivative can be an integral 13:00 Conservative forces and potential energy 13:46 Deriving Hooke’s Law from elastic potential energy 14:22 Deriving the force of gravity from gravitational potential energy 15:17 Neutral, stable, and unstable equilibrium Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Integrals in Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Dynamics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control help.
  14. Calculus based review of Newton’s three laws, basic forces in dynamics such as the force of gravity, force normal, force of tension, force applied, force of friction, free body diagrams, translational equilibrium, the drag or resistive force and terminal velocity. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:18 Newton’s First Law 1:30 Newton’s Second Law 1:55 Newton’s Third Law 2:29 Force of Gravity 3:36 Force Normal 3:58 Force of Tension 4:24 Force Applied 4:33 Force of Friction 5:46 Static Friction 6:17 Kinetic Friction 6:33 The Coefficient of Friction 7:26 Free Body Diagrams 10:41 Translational equilibrium 11:41 Drag Force or Resistive Force 13:25 Terminal Velocity Next Video: AP Physics C: Work, Energy, and Power Review (Mechanics) Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control help.
  15. Review of conversions, velocity, acceleration, instantaneous and average velocity and acceleration, uniformly accelerated motion, free fall and free fall graphs, component vectors, vector addition, unit vectors, relative velocity and projectile motion. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Introductory Concepts 2:07 Velocity and Acceleration 3:03 Uniformly Accelerated Motion 6:51 Free Fall 7:45 Free Fall Graphs 9:16 Component Vectors 10:58 Unit Vectors 13:09 Relative Velocity 13:51 Projectile Motion Next Video: AP Physics C: Dynamics Review (Mechanics) Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Websitel Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Jen Larsen, Scott Carter, Natasha Trousdale and Aarti Sangwan
  16. A 28.8 g yellow air hockey disc elastically strikes a 26.9 g stationary red air hockey disc. If the velocity of the yellow disc before the collision is 33.6 cm/s in the x direction and after the collision it is 10.7 cm/s at an angle 63.4° S of E, what is the velocity of the red disc after the collision? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 The problem 1:49 Breaking the initial velocity of disc 1 into its components 3:06 Conservation of momentum in the x-direction 5:24 Conservation of momentum in the y-direction 6:26 Solving for the final velocity of disc 2 using its components 8:40 Was this an elastic collision? 12:39 Movie Character Day! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Introduction to Circular Motion and Arc Length Previous Video: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen "Nombre de los vientos". Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons -
  17. Version 1.0.1

    The AP* Physics C Companion - Mechanics is an easy-to-read companion to the AP Physics C: Mechanics curriculum, featuring 350 sample problems with fully worked-out solutions. The AP Physics C Companion: Mechanics covers all major topics of the AP Physics C Mechanics course, including fundamentals of calculus, kinematics, dynamics, work, energy, momentum, rotation, oscillations, and gravity. The AP Physics C Companion is not a textbook replacement nor is it a strict test-prep guide. It is a short, sweet roadmap to calculus-based physics courses such as AP Physics C: Mechanics and University Physics I, invaluable not just during test prep time, but throughout the entire course. The book lays out basic physics principles as quickly and clearly as possible, then demonstrates their application with hundreds of example problems solved in detail. Written by a physics teacher, The AP Physics C Companion correlates directly with the APlusPhysics.com website, where you will find free video mini-lessonsexplaining fundamental concepts, detailed study guides, a question and answer discussion board, and most importantly, a meeting place where you can interact with other students from around the world. This is a license for a digital download of the PDF version for use by one person only on up to five electronic devices. This document may not be printed, edited, re-distributed, re-sold, or licensed to any other user. Once the file has been downloaded no refunds will be given.

    $10.00

  18. By the time students learn about all the equations for mechanical energy, momentum, impulse and impact force, they often start to confuse the equations with one another. This is a straightforward, simple look at all of those equations and when to use them. This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:14 Tacky Sweater Day! 0:22 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 0:54 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:30 Net Work equals change in Kinetic Energy 3:01 Conservation of Momentum does NOT require the work due to friction to be zero 3:28 The initial and final points when dealing with momentum are predetermined 3:56 Impulse does not equal Impact Force Thank you to Sophie Jones and her family for letting me use six of their sweaters in this video! Next Video: 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  19. Episode 12. The Millikan Experiment: A dramatic recreation of Millikan's classic oil-drop experiment to determine the charge of a single electron.“The Mechanical Universe,” is a critically-acclaimed series of 52 thirty-minute videos covering the basic topics of an introductory university physics course.Each program in the series opens and closes with Caltech Professor David Goodstein providing philosophical, historical and often humorous insight into the subject at hand while lecturing to his freshman physics class. The series contains hundreds of computer animation segments, created by Dr. James F. Blinn, as the primary tool of instruction. Dynamic location footage and historical re-creations are also used to stress the fact that science is a human endeavor. The series was originally produced as a broadcast telecourse in 1985 by Caltech and Intelecom, Inc. with program funding from the Annenberg/CPB Project.The online version of the series is sponsored by the Information Science and Technology initiative at Caltech. http://ist.caltech.edu©1985 California Institute of Technology, The Corporation for Community College Television, and The Annenberg/CPB Project
  20. A racquetball is dropped on to three different substances from the same height above each: water, soil, and wood. Rank the _______ during the collision with each substance in order from least to most. (a) Impulse. (b) Average Force of Impact. (Assume the racquetball stops during the collision with the water and soil.) This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Prom Dress Day! 0:20 The three demonstrations 0:32 The problem 1:43 The equation for Impulse and Impact Force 2:02 Understanding the two parts to the demonstrations 3:33 Part (a): Impulse [water and soil] 4:47 Part (a): Impulse [wood] 5:23 Part (b): Impact Force [water and soil] 6:27 Part (b): Impact Force [wood] 7:59 The Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project Thank you to Jan Wery and Judi Lintott of the Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project: “Find your dream dress for less than $25." Next Video: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  21. A 66 g beanbag is dropped and stops upon impact with the ground. If the impulse measured during the collision is 0.33 N·s, from what height above the ground was the beanbag dropped? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Superhero Day! 0:56 The problem 1:39 Splitting the problem in to two parts 2:32 Using Impulse for part 2 3:30 Using Conservation of Energy for part 1 4:45 What went wrong? Next Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Thanks to Adam Herz for letting me borrow a VHS copy of our high school video yearbook which he was instrumental in the creating of. Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke and Jennifer Larsen
  22. Two kids walk through the woods discussing momentum. I mean, who wouldn’t? Okay, fine. It’s a basic introduction to the concept of momentum. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Next Video: Force of Impact Equation Derivation http://www.flippingphysics.com/impact-force.html Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Instantaneous Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Please support me on Patreon! Please consider becoming a Flipping Physics Quality Control helper.
  23. An important review highlighting differences between the equations for Conservation of Momentum, Impact Force and Impulse. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:17 Conservation of Momentum 1:01 An explosion is a collision in reverse 1:22 Impact Force 1:39 Impulse 2:16 Impulse equals 3 things 2:53 How many objects are in these equations? A big THANK YOU to Elle Konrad who let me borrow several of her old dance costumes! Next Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  24. Demonstrating and measuring how a helmet changes impulse, impact force and change in time during a collision. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:21 The demonstration without a helmet 1:15 The equation for Impulse 1:55 How a helmet should affect the variables 2:36 The demonstration with a helmet 3:29 Comparing with and without a helmet Next Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter, and Jennifer Larsen
  25. Demonstrating, measuring and showing Impulse is Area Under the Force vs. Time Curve. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:09 Deriving the Impulse Equation using algebra 0:47 Deriving the Impulse Equation using calculus 2:08 The demonstration 2:42 Illustrating “area under the curve” Next Video: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Elastic Collision Problem Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter, and Jennifer Larsen
  26. An elastic collision is demonstrated and analyzed. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. A big thank you to Mr. Becke for being a guest in today’s video! Content Times: 0:25 Reading and translating the problem 1:17 The demonstration 1:52 Solving for velocity final of cart 2 3:46 Measuring the velocity final of cart 2 4:25 Checking if kinetic energy is conserved 6:22 We should have converted to meters per second Next Video: Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Perfectly Inelastic Collision Problem Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke and Jennifer Larsen
  27. A perfectly inelastic collision is demonstrated and analyzed. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:08 Demonstrating the Perfectly Inelastic Collision 0:41 Known values 1:34 Using Conservation of Momentum 2:22 Both objects have the same final velocity 3:37 Measuring the final velocity 4:05 Determining the relative error 4:45 Fruit Day! Next Video: Introductory Elastic Collision Problem Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introduction to Elastic and Inelastic Collisions Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Controllers: Christopher Becke Scott Carter
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