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  2. Analyzing the forces acting on a bucket of water which is revolving in a vertical circle. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. A big thank you to Mr. Becke for being a guest in today’s video! Content Times: 0:11 The demonstration 0:24 Drawing four Free Body Diagrams 1:30 Summing the forces with the bucket at the bottom 2:27 What is the centripetal force? 3:28 Why the Force Normal greater than the Force of Gravity with Mr. Becke! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating Why Water Stays in a Bucket Revolving in a Vertical Circle Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
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  4. Yes, water stays in the bucket. Would you like to know why? Watch the video and learn! Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:14 The demonstration 0:52 Why does water flow out of a bucket? 1:40 Inertia! 2:38 Visualizing why Next Video: Analyzing Water in a Bucket Revolving in a Vertical Circle Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Determining the Force Normal on a Toy Car moving up a Curved Hill Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  5. A 0.453 kg toy car moving at 1.15 m/s is going up a semi-circular hill with a radius of 0.89 m. When the hill makes an angle of 32° with the horizontal, what is the magnitude of the force normal on the car? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08: Translating the problem 1:01 Clarifying the angle 1:51 Drawing the free body diagram 3:20 Summing the forces 4:22 How the tangential velocity and force normal change Next Video: Demonstrating Why Water Stays in a Bucket Revolving in a Vertical Circle Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Mints on a Rotating Turntable - Determining the Static Coefficient of Friction Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  6. What is the maximum linear speed a car can move over the top of a semi-circular hill without its tires lifting off the ground? The radius of the hill is 1.8 meters. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08 Translating the problem 0:42 Drawing the free body diagram and summing the forces 1:45 Why the force normal is zero in this situation 2:26 Finishing the problem Next Video: Determining the Force Normal on a Toy Car moving up a Curved Hill Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Centripetal Force Problem - Car over a Hill Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  7. A 453 g toy car moving at 1.05 m/s is going over a semi-circular hill with a radius of 1.8 m. When the car is at the top of the hill, what is the magnitude of the force from the ground on the car? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08 Translating the problem 1:49 Drawing the free body diagram 2:43 We need to sum the forces in the in-direction 3:22 The “in-direction” is positive. The “out-direction” is negative 4:06 Identifying the centripetal force in this problem 4:54 Solving the problem … finally. 6:15 Kit compares the magnitudes of the force normal and force of gravity Thank you to Kit from Gorilla Physics for your help with this video!! Next Video: What is the Maximum Speed of a Car at the Top of a Hill? Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Centripetal Force Introduction and Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  8. Learn why a centripetal force exists, three important things to remember about centripetal force, and drawing free body diagrams for objects moving in circles. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:01 Newton’s Second Law for Centripetal Force 1:10 Three things to remember about Centripetal Force 2:41 Drawing a free body diagram 3:57 Why we sum the forces in the “in-direction” Next Video: Introductory Centripetal Force Problem - Car over a Hill Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Centripetal Acceleration Problem - Cylindrical Space Station Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  9. A cylindrical space station with a radius of 115 m is rotating at 0.292 rad/s. A ladder goes from the rim to the center. What is the magnitude of the centripetal acceleration at (1) the top of the ladder, (2) the middle of the ladder, and (3) the base of the ladder? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:12 Translating the problem 1:14 Solving the problem 2:54 Interpreting the results - Artificial Gravity 4:30 What do you feel on the ladder? Next Video: Centripetal Force Introduction and Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Centripetal Acceleration Introduction Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Aarti Sangwan and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  10. Centripetal Acceleration Introduction

    Why is there a “center seeking” centripetal acceleration? A step-by-step walk through of the answer to this question. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:09 Which mint has the largest angular velocity? 1:14 What do we know about the angular and tangential accelerations of the mints? 2:21 What do we know about the tangential velocity of mint #3? 3:39 Centripetal acceleration introduction 4:44 The centripetal acceleration equations 5:35 The units for centripetal acceleration Next Video: Introductory Centripetal Acceleration Problem - Cylindrical Space Station Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating the Directions of Tangential Velocity and Acceleration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Aarti Sangwan for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  11. Walk-through of the 2017 AP Physics C: Mechanics Free Response Questions. Questions can be found at https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pd....For more information, please visit APlusPhysics.com. You can also check out the new AP Physics C Companion: Mechanics, a guide book designed to assist in your studies of AP Physics C: Mechanics. Both black-and-white and full-color versions available from Amazon.com: http://amzn.to/2vPCvB3*AP and Advanced Placement Program are registered trademarks of the College Board, which does not sponsor or endorse this work.
  12. Walk-through of the 2017 AP Physics C: Electricity and Magnetism Free Response Questions. Questions can be found at https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pd....For more information, please visit http://APlusPhysics.com.*AP and Advanced Placement Program are registered trademarks of the College Board, which does not sponsor or endorse this work.
  13. Walk-through of the 2017 AP Physics 1 Free Response Questions. Questions can be found at https://secure-media.collegeboard.org...For more information, please visit http://aplusphysics.com*AP and Advanced Placement Program are registered trademarks of the College Board, which does not sponsor or endorse this work.
  14. Walk-through of the 2017 AP Physics 2 Free Response Questions. Questions can be found at https://apcentral.collegeboard.org/pd....For more information, please visit http://aplusphysics.com.Looking for help in AP Physics 2? Check out my course guidebook, AP Physics 2 Essentials: An APlusPhysics Guide! http://amzn.to/2vPMA0H*AP and Advanced Placement Program are registered trademarks of the College Board, which does not sponsor or endorse this work.
  15. The best way to understand how tangential velocity and tangential acceleration are related is to visualize from above. Will you look at that! This video does exactly that. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:10 Visualizing up the three parts of the demonstration 0:51 Visualizing the tangential velocities 1:41 Visualizing the tangential accelerations 3:11 Visualizing tangential velocities and accelerations simultaneously 4:52 Angular vs. Tangential quantities Next Video: Centripetal Acceleration Introduction Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Tangential Acceleration Introduction with Example Problem - Mints on a Turntable Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Natasha Trousdale for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  16. Tangential Acceleration is introduced and visualized. Example problem is worked through. We even relate arc length, tangential velocity, and tangential acceleration via the derivative! Example: A record player is plugged in and uniformly accelerates to 45 revolutions per minute in 0.85 seconds. Mints are located 3.0 cm, 8.0 cm, and 13.0 cm from the center of the record. What is the magnitude of the tangential acceleration of each mint? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:21 The tangential acceleration equation 0:55 Translating the example problem 2:13 Solving for angular acceleration 3:02 Solving for tangential accelerations 4:16 Visualizing the tangential accelerations 5:05 Using the derivative to relate arc length, tangential velocity, and tangential acceleration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Demonstrating the Directions of Tangential Velocity and Acceleration Previous Video: Introductory Tangential Velocity Problem - Mints on a Turntable Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Natasha Trousdale for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  17. Three mints are sitting 3.0 cm, 8.0 cm, and 13.0 cm from the center of a record player that is spinning at 45 revolutions per minute. What are the tangential velocities of each mint? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08 Translating the problem 1:11 Solving the problem 2:12 Visualizing the tangential velocities 2:42 The direction of tangential velocity Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Tangential Acceleration Introduction with Example Problem - Mints on a Turntable Previous Video: Human Tangential Velocity Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Natasha Trousdale for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  18. Humans are best for demonstrating Tangential Velocity and understanding that it is not the same as angular velocity. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:10 Beginning the demonstration 1:19 Adding the last human 1:50 What was different for each human? 2:44 Visualizing tangential velocity using an aerial view Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Introductory Tangential Velocity Problem - Mints on a Turntable Previous Video: Introductory Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion Problem - A CD Player Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Natasha Trousdale for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  19. What is the angular acceleration of a compact disc that turns through 3.25 revolutions while it uniformly slows to a stop in 2.27 seconds? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08 Translating the problem 0:52 Determining which Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion (UαM) equation to use 1:54 Using a second UαM equation Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Human Tangential Velocity Demonstration Previous Video: Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion Introduction Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  20. Using Uniformly Accelerated Motion (UAM) as a framework to learn about Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion (UαM). Just like UAM, UαM has 5 variables, 4 equations and if you know 3 of the UαM variables, you can determine the other 2 UαM variables, which leaves you with 1 … Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:15 Introducing Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion! (UαM) 0:38 Reviewing Uniformly Accelerated Motion 1:22 When can we use the UαM Equations? 2:24 The four UαM Equations 4:20 Examples of objects in UαM 4:48 Average and instantaneous angular velocity and the UαM equations Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Introductory Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion Problem - A CD Player Previous Video: Angular Accelerations of a Record Player Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  21. A record player is plugged in, uniformly accelerates to 45 revolutions per minute, and then is unplugged. The record player (a) takes 0.85 seconds to get up to speed, (b) spends 3.37 seconds at 45 rpms, and then (c) takes 2.32 seconds to slow down to a stop. What is the average angular acceleration of the record player during all three parts? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:08 Translating the problem 2:35 Solving part (a) - angular acceleration while speeding up 3:13 Solving part (b) - angular acceleration at a constant angular velocity 3:57 Solving part (c) - angular acceleration while slowing down 4:36 Reflecting on all 3 parts simultaneously Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion Introduction Previous Video: Angular Acceleration Introduction Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  22. Angular Acceleration Introduction

    Angular acceleration is introduced by way of linear acceleration. The units of radians per second squared are discussed. Examples of objects which angular acceleration are shown. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:23 Average angular acceleration 1:02 Angular acceleration units 1:37 Demonstrating objects which have angular acceleration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Angular Accelerations of a Record Player Previous Video: Introductory Angular Velocity Problem - A Turning Bike Tire Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Aarti Sangwan, Scott Carter, and Christopher Becke for being my Quality Control team for this video.
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