Flipping Physics

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About Flipping Physics

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    Physics Instructor
  • Birthday 04/16/1973

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  1. A 28.8 g yellow air hockey disc elastically strikes a 26.9 g stationary red air hockey disc. If the velocity of the yellow disc before the collision is 33.6 cm/s in the x direction and after the collision it is 10.7 cm/s at an angle 63.4° S of E, what is the velocity of the red disc after the collision? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 The problem 1:49 Breaking the initial velocity of disc 1 into its components 3:06 Conservation of momentum in the x-direction 5:24 Conservation of momentum in the y-direction 6:26 Solving for the final velocity of disc 2 using its components 8:40 Was this an elastic collision? 12:39 Movie Character Day! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen "Nombre de los vientos". Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons -
  2. Name: 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2017-02-16 Submitter: Flipping Physics A 28.8 g yellow air hockey disc elastically strikes a 26.9 g stationary red air hockey disc. If the velocity of the yellow disc before the collision is 33.6 cm/s in the x direction and after the collision it is 10.7 cm/s at an angle 63.4° S of E, what is the velocity of the red disc after the collision? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 The problem 1:49 Breaking the initial velocity of disc 1 into its components 3:06 Conservation of momentum in the x-direction 5:24 Conservation of momentum in the y-direction 6:26 Solving for the final velocity of disc 2 using its components 8:40 Was this an elastic collision? 12:39 Movie Character Day! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen "Nombre de los vientos". Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons - 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs
  3. By the time students learn about all the equations for mechanical energy, momentum, impulse and impact force, they often start to confuse the equations with one another. This is a straightforward, simple look at all of those equations and when to use them. This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:14 Tacky Sweater Day! 0:22 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 0:54 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:30 Net Work equals change in Kinetic Energy 3:01 Conservation of Momentum does NOT require the work due to friction to be zero 3:28 The initial and final points when dealing with momentum are predetermined 3:56 Impulse does not equal Impact Force Thank you to Sophie Jones and her family for letting me use six of their sweaters in this video! Next Video: 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  4. Name: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2017-02-09 Submitter: Flipping Physics By the time students learn about all the equations for mechanical energy, momentum, impulse and impact force, they often start to confuse the equations with one another. This is a straightforward, simple look at all of those equations and when to use them. This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:14 Tacky Sweater Day! 0:22 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 0:54 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:30 Net Work equals change in Kinetic Energy 3:01 Conservation of Momentum does NOT require the work due to friction to be zero 3:28 The initial and final points when dealing with momentum are predetermined 3:56 Impulse does not equal Impact Force Thank you to Sophie Jones and her family for letting me use six of their sweaters in this video! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them!
  5. A racquetball is dropped on to three different substances from the same height above each: water, soil, and wood. Rank the _______ during the collision with each substance in order from least to most. (a) Impulse. (b) Average Force of Impact. (Assume the racquetball stops during the collision with the water and soil.) This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Prom Dress Day! 0:20 The three demonstrations 0:32 The problem 1:43 The equation for Impulse and Impact Force 2:02 Understanding the two parts to the demonstrations 3:33 Part (a): Impulse [water and soil] 4:47 Part (a): Impulse [wood] 5:23 Part (b): Impact Force [water and soil] 6:27 Part (b): Impact Force [wood] 7:59 The Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project Thank you to Jan Wery and Judi Lintott of the Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project: “Find your dream dress for less than $25." Next Video: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  6. Name: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2017-02-03 Submitter: Flipping Physics A racquetball is dropped on to three different substances from the same height above each: water, soil, and wood. Rank the _______ during the collision with each substance in order from least to most. (a) Impulse. (b) Average Force of Impact. (Assume the racquetball stops during the collision with the water and soil.) This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:11 Prom Dress Day! 0:20 The three demonstrations 0:32 The problem 1:43 The equation for Impulse and Impact Force 2:02 Understanding the two parts to the demonstrations 3:33 Part (a): Impulse [water and soil] 4:47 Part (a): Impulse [wood] 5:23 Part (b): Impact Force [water and soil] 6:27 Part (b): Impact Force [wood] 7:59 The Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project Thank you to Jan Wery and Judi Lintott of the Ann Arbor Prom Dress Project: “Find your dream dress for less than $25." Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations
  7. Name: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2017-01-26 Submitter: Flipping Physics A 66 g beanbag is dropped and stops upon impact with the ground. If the impulse measured during the collision is 0.33 N·s, from what height above the ground was the beanbag dropped? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Superhero Day! 0:56 The problem 1:39 Splitting the problem in to two parts 2:32 Using Impulse for part 2 3:30 Using Conservation of Energy for part 1 4:45 What went wrong? Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Thanks to Adam Herz for letting me borrow a VHS copy of our high school video yearbook which he was instrumental in the creating of. Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke and Jennifer Larsen Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height
  8. A 66 g beanbag is dropped and stops upon impact with the ground. If the impulse measured during the collision is 0.33 N·s, from what height above the ground was the beanbag dropped? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Superhero Day! 0:56 The problem 1:39 Splitting the problem in to two parts 2:32 Using Impulse for part 2 3:30 Using Conservation of Energy for part 1 4:45 What went wrong? Next Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Thanks to Adam Herz for letting me borrow a VHS copy of our high school video yearbook which he was instrumental in the creating of. Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke and Jennifer Larsen
  9. Name: You Can't Run From Momentum! (a momentum introduction) Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2017-01-12 Submitter: Flipping Physics Two kids walk through the woods discussing momentum. I mean, who wouldn’t? Okay, fine. It’s a basic introduction to the concept of momentum. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Next Video: Force of Impact Equation Derivation http://www.flippingphysics.com/impact-force.html Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Instantaneous Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Please support me on Patreon! Please consider becoming a Flipping Physics Quality Control helper. You Can't Run From Momentum! (a momentum introduction)
  10. Two kids walk through the woods discussing momentum. I mean, who wouldn’t? Okay, fine. It’s a basic introduction to the concept of momentum. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Next Video: Force of Impact Equation Derivation http://www.flippingphysics.com/impact-force.html Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Instantaneous Power Delivered by a Car Engine - Example Problem Please support me on Patreon! Please consider becoming a Flipping Physics Quality Control helper.
  11. An important review highlighting differences between the equations for Conservation of Momentum, Impact Force and Impulse. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:17 Conservation of Momentum 1:01 An explosion is a collision in reverse 1:22 Impact Force 1:39 Impulse 2:16 Impulse equals 3 things 2:53 How many objects are in these equations? A big THANK YOU to Elle Konrad who let me borrow several of her old dance costumes! Next Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  12. Name: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2017-01-26 Submitter: Flipping Physics An important review highlighting differences between the equations for Conservation of Momentum, Impact Force and Impulse. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:17 Conservation of Momentum 1:01 An explosion is a collision in reverse 1:22 Impact Force 1:39 Impulse 2:16 Impulse equals 3 things 2:53 How many objects are in these equations? A big THANK YOU to Elle Konrad who let me borrow several of her old dance costumes! Next Video: Using Impulse to Calculate Initial Height Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse
  13. Name: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2016-12-08 Submitter: Flipping Physics Demonstrating and measuring how a helmet changes impulse, impact force and change in time during a collision. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:21 The demonstration without a helmet 1:15 The equation for Impulse 1:55 How a helmet should affect the variables 2:36 The demonstration with a helmet 3:29 Comparing with and without a helmet Next Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter, and Jennifer Larsen Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force
  14. Demonstrating and measuring how a helmet changes impulse, impact force and change in time during a collision. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:21 The demonstration without a helmet 1:15 The equation for Impulse 1:55 How a helmet should affect the variables 2:36 The demonstration with a helmet 3:29 Comparing with and without a helmet Next Video: Review of Momentum, Impact Force, and Impulse Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter, and Jennifer Larsen
  15. Name: Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2016-12-01 Submitter: Flipping Physics Demonstrating, measuring and showing Impulse is Area Under the Force vs. Time Curve. Want lecture notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:09 Deriving the Impulse Equation using algebra 0:47 Deriving the Impulse Equation using calculus 2:08 The demonstration 2:42 Illustrating “area under the curve” Next Video: Demonstrating How Helmets Affect Impulse and Impact Force Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Elastic Collision Problem Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter, and Jennifer Larsen Demonstrating Impulse is Area Under the Curve