Cvankerkhove

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About Cvankerkhove

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  1. So we are coming to a close of the third quarter in AP physics, and therefore it is time for me to write one last blog about how this quarter went in class. We continued with the E and M course, and moved rather quickly as the AP exam would be right after the end of the quarter. Electric Potential came directly after statics, and I found this quite interesting, paticulary derivations concerning Gausses Law. Furthermore, we moved on to circuits and personally this was probably my favorite unit of the course. I really enjoyed learning about RC Circuits and how capacitors and resistors interact in a circuit; we did a lab using a bread board and Logger Pro software and this was very interesting in seeing how a capacitor discharges. Lastly, we got into magnetism, and inductance. The main thing I got out of magnetism in this course is the chicken and egg paradox with electricity and magnetism. They are one in the same as a moving electric field creates a magnetic field, and a magnetic field can induce a current. It's all about moving charges! Furthermore, I enhanced my understanding with the Bio Savart Law and the more simpler Ampers Law. All in all, this course has been my favorite out of my high school career, and I am ready to kill it on his AP exam in may. I would also like to thank Mr. Fullerton for the extension on the blog assignment.
  2. I watched a video from the YouTube account MinutePhysics and it was very interesting about conservation of energy, and staying warm in a cold climate. This video was similar to the one I wrote about in an earlier blog about it it's better to run or walk in the rain. Anyway, the video basically explained that when a person is in a very cold situation, the surface area of they're body exerts almost a protective layer of heat around they're body, of course they will still feel cold in freezing temperatures, however they are warming than they should be. When runnning, there is a draft force and therefore air resistance on ones body, and not only does this cool air make a person cold, a person is running away from the layer of heat their body creates. It would seem obvious to stay put then to stay the warmest right? Not exactly. When humans run, approximately 80% of their energy exerted is converted into heat energy. This heat energy warms a body up, but is it enough to outway the new cold faced by the person, because he faster one runs, the greater he air resistance. Well it turns out in freezing weather a person would have to run about a 6 minute mile to stay warmer than staying put. Moral of he story, wear a parca! Here is the link to he video I saw this on
  3. 007 Night fire was my absolute favorite game of all time, except I played on the ps2. The best gun was the rocket launcher where you could shoot it and then control where the missile goes after you shoot it. Do a blog on that gun.
  4. I recall an episode of the Simpsons where Homer and Bart go in a "Zero Gravity Ride" on a jet. In the show, the way the ride works is the jet flies very high above the altitude of Earthy, then when it reaches maximum altitude, does a nose dive towards the surface of the Earth. If we analyze the physics behind this, we can understand that because the jet is in free fall, Bart and Homer are in free fall, and therefore its like "0 Gravity." In reality, there is still a gravitational force acting on them, but it feels like there isn't because of free fall, and the jet falls at the same rate as the things inside. This is the exact same concept of a space shuttle in orbit. When astronauts are in orbit, they aren't really in a place with Zero Gravity. They are actually in constant free fall around the Earth. Furthermore, we can analyze the motion and actions Bart and Homer make when in free fall. one thing they do it float, but in order to move themselves a net force needs to act on them. By pushing their legs off the wall, a normal force is exerted on them and they can thus accelerate in the x direction until hitting the wall across them. Also, at one point they have a race by burping. Because burping releases gas from the system, an equal and opposite force pushes Homer and Bart in the opposite direction. This force is of course exaggerated for the purposes of the show, but the idea behind it is correct, similar to using a fire extinguisher on a rolling chair to move. Now indulge yourself in this comedic video of the scene.
  5. So recently in physics class, we were talking about relativity and theoretical physics, and String Theory came up. Naturally, I was intrigued by this topic, and so I researched the topic a bit. Basically here is the run down: In physics, particles can be replaced by one dimension things called "Strings." These strings propagate through space and time to interact with each other. A string is basically a quantum particle that carries a gravitational force, and therefore is Quantum gravity. Quantum gravity uses Einstein's theory of gravity using quantum mechanics. Furthermore, I watched a video on string theory where it related the creation and fission of different universes to string theory. the video compared a universe to a bubble, and we are tiny, tiny bugs on this giant bubble. A universe could form in two different ways: through either the collision of two different universes forming a new one, or the fission of one universe into two. The forming of our universe is what we have come to know as the Big Bang. This implies that if there is a multiverse of universes, we could travel to different ones. In order to accomplish this task, theoretically, we would need to use a wormhole to take a shortcut to another universe. A great example of a wormhole is to bend a piece of paper and stick a pencil through it. A wormhole is similar in that it bends space and time to create a shortcut.
  6. That spring must have an absolutely enormous spring constant in order to launch a nuke!
  7. In gym class we are currently in the Floor Hockey unit, and it has me thinking about all the physics behind hockey, both ice and floor hockey. First of all, in ice hockey, skating is an important feature. The coefficient of kinetic friction between skates and the ice is very, very low, it almost acts as a friction less surface. As result, when hockey players exert a force on the ground to accelerate themselves forward, the only way to stop in time is to turn the skates sideways and let the sharp skates dig in the ice to create a strong force of friction. For similar reasons, when a puck is shot, it will not slow down unless acted on by another force (usually another player, or the wall). Finally, why do goalies where so much padding? The reason is because a goalie is expected to save shots fired at them up to 150 mph. If they stop it, it will of coarse result in a very high impulse over a short period of time and therefore deliver a strong force to the goalie. For protection, pads are worn to decrease the change in momentum of the puck.
  8. So i was watching a YouTube video and I came across an interesting concept. This gets into theoretical physics with parallel universes and stuff. So basically the Butterfly Effect states that the smallest action, such as the flap of a butterfly's wings can change the outcome of something in the world thousands of miles away. This implies then that if a person was able to go back in time, and they make one difference, they could change the future in millions of different ways. This leads me to think that there are thousands of parallel universes, some very different from ours and some virtually the same. When a choice is said to be made, both of those choices are made, kinda similar to the Schrodinger's Cat problem. As result, there are trillions upon trillions of different combinations of choices and events, each creating a different universe. Just something to think about.
  9. Its always awesome when you can apply stuff we learn in physics to a practical use. I remember doing that lab last year.
  10. Recently in our APC physics class we have been doing electricity and magnetism and therefore our labs include creating circuits with wires, resistors, breadboards and batteries. I believe one of the most important things I learned from this lab was that licking a 9-volt battery gives you a shock. I thank Mr. Fullerton for teaching me this trick. When you lick a 9v battery, your tongue acts as a conductor as it is wet and therefore electrons are free to move, both ends are touching your tongue and therefore a mini circuit is created. If you feel a slight shock, that's good: your battery is all charged up!
  11. As basketball season has come to a close, it makes way for tennis for me, and there is plenty of physics in tennis. First off, the tennis racket itself has engineering to allow the ball to fly with maximum velocity. Many cords are woven in the foundation of the racket, the strings have a strong tension in them and as result the hard tension allows for a ball to bounce of the racket and change direction. The rackets tensions are rated in force, specifically pounds (maybe newtons in Europe). anyway that's just a little bit on tennis. There is plenty more such as kinematics and momentum, but that's for another blog.
  12. So it has been break, and on a rainy day without school what can you do (other than read the physics textbook)? Go rock climbing. That's what I did recently and there is plenty of physics in it. For starters, when a person climbs up a wall, they are doing work against the force of gravity, or the gravitational field. Therefore potential energy is gained he higher one goes up. Now energy exerted is of course lost with sound and friction between rocks and hands. Furthermore, there are plenty of safety measures when rock climbing in a licsensed facility. Many places have people strapped to ropes in case of a fall, and to get down. Simply put, the rope is suspended over a pulley, with a person climbing on one end, and another person on the ground. The pulley helps redistribute the weight of the climbing. Once the person is ready to come down, the rope is pulled tight for the person climbing to be suspended in air. Therefore, the tension in the rope is approximately the weight of the person.
  13. Yo did! Thanks man
  14. Interesting bro. Cool when chemistry and physics cross over
  15. Our latest unit in gym class is archery and it has me thinking quite a bit about the physics behind a bow and arrow. For example, first of a bow is composed of a frame of some material that can stretch. Next a stein string like material is tied to each end. The tighter the string, the higher the tension. A bow with a higher tension applies a greater force and therefore the impulse delerviered to the arrow is greater, (which of course is change in momentum). Energy is transferred into the arrow which hits a target or deer etc. other factors that come into play include air resistance and the force of gravity. Lastly, there are bows with pulleys that redistribute the force, making it easier to pull back the arrow, but still have a great force applied. The compound bow was invented by a man with the last name Bear. Thanks Bear!