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Found 33 results

  1. Name: Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them! Category: Momentum and Collisions Date Added: 2017-02-16 Submitter: Flipping Physics By the time students learn about all the equations for mechanical energy, momentum, impulse and impact force, they often start to confuse the equations with one another. This is a straightforward, simple look at all of those equations and when to use them. This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:14 Tacky Sweater Day! 0:22 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 0:54 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:30 Net Work equals change in Kinetic Energy 3:01 Conservation of Momentum does NOT require the work due to friction to be zero 3:28 The initial and final points when dealing with momentum are predetermined 3:56 Impulse does not equal Impact Force Thank you to Sophie Jones and her family for letting me use six of their sweaters in this video! Next Video: 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen Review of Mechanical Energy and Momentum Equations and When To Use Them!
  2. By the time students learn about all the equations for mechanical energy, momentum, impulse and impact force, they often start to confuse the equations with one another. This is a straightforward, simple look at all of those equations and when to use them. This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:14 Tacky Sweater Day! 0:22 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 0:54 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:30 Net Work equals change in Kinetic Energy 3:01 Conservation of Momentum does NOT require the work due to friction to be zero 3:28 The initial and final points when dealing with momentum are predetermined 3:56 Impulse does not equal Impact Force Thank you to Sophie Jones and her family for letting me use six of their sweaters in this video! Next Video: 2D Conservation of Momentum Example using Air Hockey Discs Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Impulse Comparison of Three Different Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to my Quality Control help: Christopher Becke, Scott Carter and Jennifer Larsen
  3. 5.39 Q

    In the following diagram, a force F acts on a cart in motion on a frictionless surface. The initial and final velocities of each cart are shown. Rank the energy required to change each cart's velocity from greatest to least. A: Weighs 2 kg, 5 m/s to 2 m/s - Change in KE = 1/2*2*(2*2-5*5) J = -21 J B: Weighs 3 kg, 3 m/s to -3 m/s - Change in KE = 1/2*3*(3*3-(-3)*(-3)) J = 0 J C: Weighs 5 kg, 5 m/s to 6 m/s - Change in KE = 1/2*5*(6*6-5*5) J = 27.5 J D: Weighs 4 kg, -1 m/s to 2 m/s - Change in KE = 1/2*4*(2*2-(-1)*(-1)) J = 6 J The answer says that the ranking is C, B, A, D, which doesn't make any sense to me given the calculations I made. Can someone please explain what I did wrong, or clarify the question?
  4. Big, Empty Space

    Something that baffles scientists today is a strange situation called the Fermi Paradox, named after Italian physicist Enrico Fermi. The basic conundrum is that there's an incredibly high probability that alien life forms not only exist in the universe, but nearby Earth. The reason for this statement is the radically large number of solar systems in our galaxy alone. With so many stars in the observable universe, billions are similar to our Sun. The likelihood that many of these stars have Earth-like planets is therefore quite high. Assuming Earth is a typical planet, intelligent life must have developed on many of these planets. Our planet has existed for about 4.5 billion years in a 14 billion year old universe, so there should have been plenty of time for countless organic lifeforms to develop space travel and begin exploring our galaxy, since humans have come thus far in only 200,000 years. Finally, with rough estimates based on current hypothesis for interstellar travel (which may in fact be very slow and inefficient) the Milky Way Galaxy could be traversed in only about a million years, and totally colonized in about two million. So, scientists wonder, where are all the aliens? Why, if life in our galaxy has had so many chances to exist, do we have such little evidence of extraterrestrials? Well, there are several different hypotheses. One idea concerns filters. This idea states that life has many difficult to pass barriers which make its existence incredibly difficult. We've passed some already, such as the still undiscovered process through which life originates, mutually assured destruction, and extinction events. Perhaps the universe was actually incredibly hostile and dangerous for any life until only recently, making humans some of the first ever. And, there are great filters in our future as well, such as irreversible climate change. Maybe there's some impassible filter we don't know of, and won't for a long time, that no life form has yet to defeat. Plenty of people have already assumed that nuclear bombs and the Large Hadron Collider would destroy the Earth, maybe someday they'll be right. There's also the idea that other life forms are preventing this interaction. Maybe some incredibly advanced life form from far away has advanced enough that they can control the entire galaxy, and they don't want other life forms to advance to the point where they pose a threat. Maybe they physically prevent interaction in order to stop the spread of ideas, and prevent any further development. Or, perhaps they act as a filter themselves, and annihilate and race that begins to get too far. Or, maybe we're actually just alone. We could be the first life ever to exist, the only, and the last once we eventually kick the bucket. Any way it works out, scientists still don't really have an answer to the Fermi Paradox, and with good reason. This question is a very confusing, scary, and difficult one to answer. So, for now, all we know is that either there's no evidence of life on Earth, or the government took it.
  5. Name: Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem by Billy Category: Work, Energy, Power Date Added: 2016-02-17 Submitter: Flipping Physics Enjoy learning from Billy as he solves a problem using Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:21 The problem 0:51 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:31 Determining the Mechanical Energies 2:44 Solving for the Force Normal 3:52 Relating height final to displacement along the incline 5:03 Substituting in numbers Next Video: Deriving the Work-Energy Theorem using Calculus See this problem solved using Conservation of Energy and Newton’s Second Law. Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem 1¢/minute Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem by Billy
  6. Enjoy learning from Billy as he solves a problem using Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:21 The problem 0:51 Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy 1:31 Determining the Mechanical Energies 2:44 Solving for the Force Normal 3:52 Relating height final to displacement along the incline 5:03 Substituting in numbers Next Video: Deriving the Work-Energy Theorem using Calculus See this problem solved using Conservation of Energy and Newton’s Second Law. Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem 1¢/minute
  7. Name: Introductory Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem Category: Work, Energy, Power Date Added: 2016-02-12 Submitter: Flipping Physics The equation Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy can often be confusing for students. This video is a step-by-step introduction in how to use the formula to solve a problem. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:09 The problem 1:29 Why we can use this equation in this problem 1:52 Expanding the equation 2:29 Identifying Initial and Final Points and the Horizontal Zero Line 3:00 Substituting into the left hand side of the equation 4:05 Deciding which Mechanical Energies are present 4:59 Where did all that Kinetic Energy go? 5:27 Identifying which variables we know and do not know 5:58 Solving for the Force Normal 6:57 Substituting Force Normal back into the original equation 8:09 Why isn’t our answer negative? Next Video: Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem by Billy Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introduction to Mechanical Energy with Friction 1¢/minute Introductory Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem
  8. The equation Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy can often be confusing for students. This video is a step-by-step introduction in how to use the formula to solve a problem. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:09 The problem 1:29 Why we can use this equation in this problem 1:52 Expanding the equation 2:29 Identifying Initial and Final Points and the Horizontal Zero Line 3:00 Substituting into the left hand side of the equation 4:05 Deciding which Mechanical Energies are present 4:59 Where did all that Kinetic Energy go? 5:27 Identifying which variables we know and do not know 5:58 Solving for the Force Normal 6:57 Substituting Force Normal back into the original equation 8:09 Why isn’t our answer negative? Next Video: Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem by Billy Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introduction to Mechanical Energy with Friction 1¢/minute
  9. Name: Introduction to Mechanical Energy with Friction Category: Work, Energy, Power Date Added: 2016-02-08 Submitter: Flipping Physics Learn how to use Mechanical Energy when the Work done by Friction does not equal zero. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:09 When is Conservation of Mechanical energy true? 0:37 Work due to Friction equals the Change in Mechanical Energy 1:57 Determining the angle in the work equation 3:01 When the angle is not 180 degrees 3:50 What if the work done by friction is zero? 4:31 Always identify … Next Video: Introductory Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: The Energy Song by Bo 1¢/minute Introduction to Mechanical Energy with Friction
  10. Learn how to use Mechanical Energy when the Work done by Friction does not equal zero. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:09 When is Conservation of Mechanical energy true? 0:37 Work due to Friction equals the Change in Mechanical Energy 1:57 Determining the angle in the work equation 3:01 When the angle is not 180 degrees 3:50 What if the work done by friction is zero? 4:31 Always identify … Next Video: Introductory Work due to Friction equals Change in Mechanical Energy Problem Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: The Energy Song by Bo 1¢/minute
  11. Over 9000

    We all know Einstein's famous equations E=mc^2. It means that energy and mass are two halves of the same variable, and that a little mass makes an enormous amount of energy. We also know its disastrous effects, as evidenced in the US's infamous Manhattan Project. The first nuclear bomb ever tested was dubbed "The Gadget, " and the test itself was nicknamed the Trinity Test. It was conducted on the morning of July 16, 1945 in the Alamogordo bombing range of New Mexico. The bomb was said to release the energy of about 20 kilotons of TNT, or about 84 terrajoules. Now, if we plug that number into Einstein's equation, we can find exactly how much radioactive plutonium was put towards the actual explosion. Using 3E8 as c and 84E12 as E, we find that the mass of the plutonium reacting was about 9E-4Kg. However, I assure you much more plutonium was used to create the Gadget than that. So where did all the rest go? Well, into the massive amount of heat and light created, more than enough to blind people and incinerate standing structures for miles. This conversion seems to be the most powerful force we can today harness, and it truly has awe inspiriing results.
  12. Name: The Energy Song by Bo Category: Work, Energy, Power Date Added: 2016-01-29 Submitter: Flipping Physics Sing and learn about Work and Mechanical Energy with Bo! Want Lyrics? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Introduction to Mechanical Energy with Friction Previous Video: Conservation of Energy Problem with Friction, an Incline and a Spring by Billy Hear "The Energy Song" on Soundcloud. 1¢/minute The Energy Song by Bo
  13. The Energy Song by Bo

    Sing and learn about Work and Mechanical Energy with Bo! Want Lyrics? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Next Video: Introduction to Mechanical Energy with Friction Previous Video: Conservation of Energy Problem with Friction, an Incline and a Spring by Billy Hear "The Energy Song" on Soundcloud. 1¢/minute
  14. Name: Conservation of Energy Problem with Friction, an Incline and a Spring by Billy Category: Work, Energy, Power Date Added: 2016-01-14 Submitter: Flipping Physics Billy helps you review Conservation of Mechanical Energy, springs, inclines, and uniformly accelerated motion all in one example problem. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:10 The problem 0:38 Listing the known values 1:40 Using Conservation of Mechanical Energy 2:56 Canceling out the Mechanical Energies which are not there 4:18 Drawing the Free Body Diagram 4:52 Summing the forces in the perpendicular direction 5:26 Summing the forces in the parallel direction 6:59 Using Uniformly Accelerated Motion 7:56 Finding the maximum height Next Video: Work due to the Force of Gravity on an Incline by Billy Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Conservation of Mechanical Energy Problem using a Trebuchet 1¢/minute Conservation of Energy Problem with Friction, an Incline and a Spring by Billy
  15. Billy helps you review Conservation of Mechanical Energy, springs, inclines, and uniformly accelerated motion all in one example problem. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:10 The problem 0:38 Listing the known values 1:40 Using Conservation of Mechanical Energy 2:56 Canceling out the Mechanical Energies which are not there 4:18 Drawing the Free Body Diagram 4:52 Summing the forces in the perpendicular direction 5:26 Summing the forces in the parallel direction 6:59 Using Uniformly Accelerated Motion 7:56 Finding the maximum height Next Video: Work due to the Force of Gravity on an Incline by Billy Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Conservation of Mechanical Energy Problem using a Trebuchet 1¢/minute
  16. Name: Introduction to Conservation of Mechanical Energy with Demonstrations Category: Work, Energy, Power Date Added: 2015-12-18 Submitter: Flipping Physics Ian Terry, winner of Big Brother 14, makes a special appearance to help us learn about Conservation of Mechanical Energy. See several demonstrations and understand when mechanical energy is conserved. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:01 Reviewing the three different types of mechanical energy 0:23 Mr. Terry drops an object for our first demonstration 0:58 Calculating Kinetic Energy and Gravitational Potential Energy 2:53 Mechanical energy data table 3:37 Conservation of mechanical energy graph 5:10 When is mechanical energy conserved? 7:13 A second demonstration of conservation of mechanical energy Next Video: Introduction to Conservation of Mechanical Energy with Demonstrations Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introduction to Elastic Potential Energy with Examples 1¢/minute Introduction to Conservation of Mechanical Energy with Demonstrations
  17. Ian Terry, winner of Big Brother 14, makes a special appearance to help us learn about Conservation of Mechanical Energy. See several demonstrations and understand when mechanical energy is conserved. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 topic. Content Times: 0:01 Reviewing the three different types of mechanical energy 0:23 Mr. Terry drops an object for our first demonstration 0:58 Calculating Kinetic Energy and Gravitational Potential Energy 2:53 Mechanical energy data table 3:37 Conservation of mechanical energy graph 5:10 When is mechanical energy conserved? 7:13 A second demonstration of conservation of mechanical energy Next Video: Introduction to Conservation of Mechanical Energy with Demonstrations Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introduction to Elastic Potential Energy with Examples 1¢/minute
  18. Electrifying!

    Remember those cartoon kids shows where lightning bolts sent you flying into the sky with your pants on fire? I’m talking about a Team Rocket blasting off again sort of scenario. I always thought those were pretty funny, but how would they work in real life? Let’s assume that by the Laws of Disney magic, being struck with lightning instantly converts all of its energy into kinetic energy for the object hit. So, a 50 kg cartoon character gets pegged. The average lightning bolt has about 5 GJ of electrical energy in it, and contact lasts only about 30 µs. The character starts at rest. Kinetic Energy = .5mv^2, so we can calculate the new speed of the character to be 14,142.14 m/s. Let’s say this is actually James from Team Rocket, so of course he shoots up into the air at an angle of about 75° with the ground. Using the kinematics equations this time we can find that his maximum height is about 9,510,832.84 m. I guess they were right all along: James would disappear almost instantly, like a flash in the sky. Huh.
  19. Grapple Zapple

    Everybody loves a good hero. But, are they realistic? Some of our favorite crusaders - Batman, Link, Green Arrow - use grappling hooks to get around. I wonder if they’d work like in the games and movies. Let’s say Batman is trying to get into Arkham Asylum to teach some no good-nicks what he thinks of this whole “rehabilitation” thing. He needs to get two floors up, which is about 6.6 m. And, like in the movies, he needs to rocket up that distance, let’s say at about 6 m/s. The average man weighs 70 kg, but Batman is pretty buff, so we’ll make it 75 kg. We can calculate the work needed to be (.5)mv^2 + mgh, which here equals 6205.95 J. We also know v = d/t, so that means t = d/v = 1.1 s. And, power = W/t = 5641.77 W. It’s pretty safe to say a handheld motor like the ones we see in the media couldn’t make over 5.5 kW of pull. A mounted artillery grappling gun could, and are used by the US special forces for stealth missions. However, until our technology evolves a bit more, Batman will just have to learn to actually fly.
  20. Review of the topics of Work, Energy, Power and Hooke’s Law covered in the AP Physics 1 curriculum. Content Times: 0:18 Work 1:38 Kinetic Energy 2:13 Elastic Potential Energy 3:02 Gravitational Potential Energy 4:02 Work and Energy are in Joules 4:58 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 5:54 Work due to Friction equals the Change in Mechanical Energy 6:46 Power 7:46 Hooke’s Law Multilingual? [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/translate.html"]Please help translate Flipping Physics videos[/url]! Want [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/ap1-work-review.html"]Lecture Notes[/url]? Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/ap1-momentum-review.html"]Linear Momentum and Impulse Review for AP Physics 1[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/ap1-dynamics-review.html"]Dynamics Review for AP Physics 1[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url]
  21. Name: Work, Energy and Power Review for AP Physics 1 Category: Exam Prep Date Added: 13 March 2015 - 08:25 AM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided Review of the topics of Work, Energy, Power and Hooke’s Law covered in the AP Physics 1 curriculum. Content Times: 0:18 Work 1:38 Kinetic Energy 2:13 Elastic Potential Energy 3:02 Gravitational Potential Energy 4:02 Work and Energy are in Joules 4:58 Conservation of Mechanical Energy 5:54 Work due to Friction equals the Change in Mechanical Energy 6:46 Power 7:46 Hooke’s Law Multilingual? View Video
  22. Halfpipes?

    I used to own a half-pipe. Well, a mini-pipe rather. It was a about 1.5 meters tall. Skate baording on it is interesting because at the top of the pipe all you're energy is due to gravity. That means Etop=mgh As one rides down the half-pipe, potential energy is converted to kinetic. At the bottom Ebot=(1/2)mv^2 HOWEVER... In many sports that include a standing on board, a common method to gain speed is to PUMP. Pumping, in its simplest form, is pushing down on the board when you're going up or down a ramp. Or any curve for that matter. Its possible to PUMP on any curve who's concavity faces upwards. In the case of a half-pipe: one can pump on there way down the pipe, thus converting energy in their legs to kinetic energy using an impulse (push). And it works too. Its actually quite crucial while skating on a mini pipe. -Shabba
  23. Energy

    The higher you are from the ground the more potentional energy you have, the faster you're falling the more kinetic energy you have, but add it up and youll always have the same amount of internal energy. This is pretty much a basic concept of gymnastics. When practicing, the higher the beam is the more potential energy you have, but this also means the harder the fall or the better the dismount when transfered to kinetic energy. Or you could have the beam lower and have less potential energy, the less the fall will hurt but the more difficult the dismount. Youll hope that if the beam is low youll have more power because you have less time to do what you need to do before your feet (or other body part not of choice) hits the ground.
  24. Hello! I'm using the "AP Physics Essentials: 1" book to study for my Work, Power, and Energy exam (chapter 5.) I need clarification on question 5.10; how do we decide on the equation to use? I'm so lost on how to make that determination. Thanks!
  25. In our body, we often consciously use our skeletal muscles. Our nervous system sends an electrical signal to our muscles which affects proteins which cause our muscle to contract. Electrical energy is transmitted which begins a process of chemical energy being converted to mechanical energy. Some smooth muscles behave like skeletal muscles, while others have contractions which are regularly and methodically induced by specific cells. The actions of these cells keep systems such as the digestive system working continuously without conscious thought. The heart, the cardiac muscle, is controlled the same way as the smooth muscle. The cardiac muscle pumps blood through the body, using mechanical energy to bring oxygen to cells where it can facilitate more chemical reactions.

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