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  1. Basically when doing anything in life physics is involved. When driving physics is involved. Driving is all about getting from one place to another in the quickest amount of time because time is a precious thing and noone wants to waste it. When going from one place to another and then back to the same place from where you started is called displacement. When driving there is a certain speed that you are allowed to go. To get up to the speed that you want you must make you vehicle accelerate to the speed that you want. The velocity is how fast that your car is going. If you are stopped at a red light or a stop light your car won't go anywhere because according to Newtons first law an object at rest tends to stay at rest unless acted upon another force which could be you moving your foot from the break pedal to the gas pedal.

  2. Don't spend your life trying to find a place where fisics doesn’t apply because it doesn't exist. Not even when you are blogging. When blogging you are most likely sitting at a chair and typing on a keyboard. This applies to Newton’s third law that for every action there is an opposite and equal reaction. As you sit in the chair to blog you apply a force, your weight, to the chair and the chair pushes back up at you with an equal force. This also happens when you press on the keys to type. As you push on the keys they push back with an equal force. If this law wasn’t true blogging would be fairly difficult considering you would fall through chairs and break keys on the key board. Existence in general would be hard without this law. This isn’t however the only fisics to blogging because inside a computer is almost every subject to fisics ranging from thermodynamics and fluids in the cooling system, magnetism and energy in the wiring of it, waves because there is light and sound waves emitted, circular motion in the fan and modern fisics due to the atoms that build and keep the computer together.

  3. Merkel's Blog

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    Shooting the ball in lacrosse requires physics. When the ball is shot, it initially starts at rest and increases in velocity very quickly. When i shoot the ball it goes so fast that no one can see it and i always score. Because of the force behind the ball, it breaks the lacrosse net usually. sometimes after going through the net it hits a person. The speed of the ball is so high that it knocks most people over. The net does create some resitance along with the air so no one usually dies. They only break a bone or two.

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    Physics and tennis go together like a peanut butter and jelly sandwich- Literally! I mean, how else do you think the ball is able to meet contact with the racket or what position the racket must be in to hit the ball? IT"S ALL PHYSICS! The fastest serve ever recorded in the world is 155MPH by the famous player Andy Roddick. But how is one able to do so? Well let me explain. When you toss the ball up in the air, the player will press their feet against the ground and build up on potential energy. Then rotating the hips, legs, shoulders and with the swing of the arm, all of that maximum energy is used to create a perfect cross-court serve. Occasionally if one hits a spectacular serve, you can get what is called an "ace". An ace is basically when your opponent does NOT meet any sort of contact with the ball, and of course you receive the winning point. Yay! Another way that tennis and physics are related is through topspin. A topspin is created when you hit your forehand shot (swinging low to high on the right side of your body and when the racket slides up and over the ball as it is struck.

    image4.gif This makes it so you created a lower angle to the ground, making is harder for your opponent to return the ball. Pretty cool huh? you just learned not only how tennis and physics are related, but also how to hit pretty cool forehand shots and serves! Hope this helped!

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    SabrinaJV
    Latest Entry

    Two favorite games of mine, Assassin's Creed and Batman: Arkham City, are all about physics, whether readers are giving me displacements that run me into walls instead of leading me through my maps or I'm diving to the ground then pulling back up in order tocatch wind, distance, and acceleration. I have to find a way to shoot a poison dart at an angle where I won't be noticed, position myself just right to take criminals down in a sneak attack. Batman especially takes the cake when a sniper is after me and I need to "displace" his position to take him out.

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    So i was chillin with my boi shabba, when we were like yo lets go longboarding. So we grabbed our yatchs and headed to the local chapel hill. Now while pushing we can hit a speed (according to the speed gauges in the road) of about 15 miles per hour. Which is roughly 6.7056 meters per second. Which is relativly fast. Also, courtesy of the speed gauges, that at the end of the hill we hit speed of 33 miles per hour, which is roughly 14.75 meters per second. We were disapointed that we couldnt even hit the speed limit of 35 miles per hour, but whatevs. Using this information and the principle of conservation of energy, we can find out the hieght of chapel hill. So check this out, conservation of energy states that mgh= 1/2mv^2. Sooooooo if we plug in our values for velocity and gravity, mass becomes negligable, and we end up with a hieght of 11.1 meters. Now that seems short because i did not take in account the friction between the wheels and the pavement considering we haven't learned rolling friction. Not to mention the friction within the bearings oin the wheels themselves. So the hills A LOT taller as im sure many of you can attest to. I guess at those speeds Shabba and I best be careful.

    The Danskster out.

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    While physics is not for everyone, there are hundreds of students in high school who genuinely love it. It is one of the more difficult subjects to get through, but it can feel very rewarding when you start to learn and understand what it's really all about. Many of these students come to enjoy it so much that they desire to go on to further schooling in college to earn a degree in physics.

    For these students, and anyone applying for college, the tuition costs can be mind-boggling. Because of this, almost twelve million Americans attending school use some form of student aid to pay for school. However, if you do not know how to use financial aid properly, it can translate into a lot of loans, which then means thousands of dollars in debt. For students just coming out of high school, this is the last thing that they want to be hearing. Instead of becoming part of the statistics, find out more with this infographic and get informed on student loan debt.

    Consolidated-Credit-update.jpg

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    Greetings fellow physics students and/or insane persons (yes, I mean you),

    Well, so much for senioritis, eh? Taking AP Physics-C kind of prevents me from doing nothing. So why take the class if it prevents me from, well, enjoying, my last year? You know, that is a question I've asked myself multiple times, and I've narrowed it down to three answers. It may be one or a combination, but here they are:

    1) I enjoy science and math.

    2) I need physics for my major and I want to get it over with as soon as possible, and it looks great for college nevertheless.

    3) I'm out of my mind.

    I would normally gravitate (heh, get it? It's gravity, heh, physics. You know what never mind) towards that third answer there, but actually, now that I think about it, those first two seem like legitimate reasons, considering that I do want to go to college and major in neuroscience - you know, all that brainy stuff. I have always enjoyed science and math, and have always wanted answers - and precise ones - not just random riddles and nonsense (ahem). Anyway, this class will give me answers, and I'm looking forward to them, though I suspect that I will get answers to questions that I really don't want the answers to. Sure, it may not click right away, I don't expect it to, but I'm sure it will come...eventually. I also do need physics for my field of interest, and I'd rather get it over with now than in college. I'm not saying that that's my only reason and I'm forcing myself through this, but, yeah, it's up there. Lastly, I'm just simply crazy. Taking this class is definitely not the only reason, but it is one of the biggest ones. I had only heard nothing but complaints about the class and how difficult it was. Now, since I took AP-B last year, I could've decided not to take another physics class, and just relax. I actually had a choice, and for some reason I chose the hard work and the suffering over blissful sleep, and ignorance, I guess. Now that I am in the class, I realize that I am anxious about the whole class, and passing the exam. It will definitely be a great challenge, but I will push on through every challenge, like I always do. Hm, maybe that says something deep and important...nah, who am I kidding, I'm just crazy XD

    But really, in all the seriousness I can muster, I'm looking forward to this class, despite all the challenges. It will definitely enlighten me, teach me not only the material, but valuable life skills, and it will help me in the future - in college and farther still.

    So, wish me luck!

  4. I've been reading some of the seniors final blog posts in physics and I decided to be moved by the same wave. I didn't face any new challenges. I struggled to be consistent because I'm not the best at time or mental management. I lose track of relatively large amounts of time easily. Through the ups and downs I learned well from the master Fullerton. I too now am one master yet I feel slighted. ALL of the physics in star wars is fake... not fake but impossible in my lifetime so I learned what I already expected to be true in such depth I'm happily confused now rather than how I was mischievously curious about Physics and all that it entailed. I'm glad I spent the time in class to learn from kinematics to modern physics. Being in class turned out to be entertaining and mentally fulfilling. i've come to the conclusion that Physics isn't studied for the sake of knowing and understanding it because it seems to me, there is no end. One cannot simply understand physics further than what we understand now. I honestly believe Physics is studied to enhance ones ability to think. I think Physics is the gateway to transform thinking from being a scalar quantity to being a vector, strong, focused and intentional to derive something specific in another facet possibly. Taking Physics has allowed me to grow in a way immeasurable by me at the moment and I respect Physics. I enjoyed the class and that's all that matters besides me gaining the minute understanding I have gained. To say the least, if I could bend time I probably couldn't make myself do anything differently but if I COULD I would enjoy it more. I'll encourage my underlings to take the course too!

    Farewell Physicists!

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    Since in the summer all I mostly do is ride my bike I thought why not see how physics relates to bike riding. When I ride my bike, I find myself doing no work at all at times and then actually having to do work. After taking physics I finally realized why this is.

    Gravity, is one main factor while riding a bike. When you are to go down a hill, gravity is doing all the work for you pulling the front of your bike down the hill. Gravity will always be greater than the friction, and weight you are fighting through. Friction when going down the hill is very minimal between the spinning tire and the ground. But when you are going up the hill you are doing a lot more work because you are fighting between friction, gravity, and weight.

    Gravity will always be something you have to fight through no matter what your doing because it will always be there.

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    Sports are a huge part of most peoples daily lives. When I was younger softball was always something I wanted to do but I chose other activities over it. I decided to take a minute and learn how softball relates to physics since it's one topic I am interested in.

    Pitching in softball is related to physics because of the velocity. Pitching can be very difficult because you need to know all the different curve techniques. In softball, there are six main pitches, the fastball, change-up, curve, screw, rise, and drop. The fastball is supposed to stay on a straight path at a constant height to the ground. This would mean that the softball would need to go at a constant velocity as well. The change-up which is a slower pitch that occasionally drops right at home plate, would need to have a velocity the decreases rapidly. The curve, screw, rise, and drop are moving pitches, meaning they will bend in a different direction. The curve and screw bend in different directions which would mean that velocity would change with direction. The rise and drop would bend up and down, so their velocities would change for the same reasons as the curve and screw. Velocity is one main component of physics that effects softball.

    With doing research on this topic I learned more about the sport as well as how physics is involved with every step of this sport.

  5. This year was a good year in physics. I learned a lot about a bunch of different subjects. One of my favorite subjects was kinematics because it applies to a lot of different things. Throughout these blogs posts I used a lot of different kinematic references. My personal favorite was the drifting post because not only is drifting awesome, it can apply to so many different things in physics.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSfxQjY1LogJ7wwWN1Er-dRRqFaZVNzVwyTFD3KWYYwti0q3ABhCw

    The year has been really good though. I really enjoyed all of the labs we did because they were fun and they applied to everything we learned. Good luck to all of next years physics students.

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    Now that summer is practically here and watching my parents open the pool, I decided to do this physics blog on swimming. Swimming relates to physics a lot more than you think. Newtons first, second, and third laws play a huge part in the physics of swimming.

    Newtons first law shows the difference between static and dynamic forces and why it takes extra forces to get through two different forces. A static forces is when a body is at rest it stays at rest. The movement you feel once you get your body to move it you overcoming the static force. A dynamic force is when a body in motion wants to stay in motion. Newtons second law gives us the explanation as to why someone can swim faster than others. For example, if someones mass is equal, then it would be all about the amount of force they use to take off. Newtons third law states for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction. When swimming and doing the breast stroke,the water moves down the side of you. The equal reaction would be pushing the water back on you while the opposite reaction would be the reason why you are moving forward.

    This proves that physics is everywhere, no matter what you do!

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    Everyone enjoys the thrill of roller coasters, but not everyone takes the time to realize how they relate to physics. Roller coasters relate to physics because of the potential engery and the kinetic energy they use. As well as gravity, and using forces.

    A roller coaster uses both potential energy and kinetic energy. It stores the energy as the roller coaster is inclining up the hill because of the gravity that is pulling it down creating a greater distance. As the potential energy is released once it has reached the top of the hill, kinetic energy takes over as it is going up the hill. Roller coasters tend to be converting potential energy and kinetic energy throughout the entire ride. For example, when there is a small hill somewhere on the ride, the train will store potential energy again as it is going up that hill until it goes back down. Gravity tends to do the same thing throughout the entire ride, but in different ways. If the roller coaster were to be moving up the hill, then gravity will be pulling the back of the train so it decelerates. If the roller coaster were to be moving down the hill, then gravity will be pulling the front of the train so it accelerates.

    I've learned many things in physics and relating them to things I would of never thought about makes the topics so much more interesting!

  6. Everyone knows that one of their favorite past times is sitting in front of the television and watching movies, shows, or playing video games. However with this almost motionless, lazy activity comes a great deal of static physics and mechanics.

    When you are sitting down enjoying whatever show it is you may be watching, you actually have several forces acting on you concurrently. For example, by sitting on the couch with no extra weight on you, your weight is equivalent to the normal force, or the force of the couch on you. In addition to the force of the couch of you, if you are leaning on an arm or laying down, a similar force acts on you, except at an angle or incline. The general rule for laying on the couch watching television is that whatever force you exert on an object, that object exerts the same force in the opposite direction, or 180 degrees around.

    Next time you sit down and watch some television, remember that you are under the rules of static physics!

  7. blog-0781799001371168878.jpgWe all knew this would come eventually, from a person like myself. Personally, I love pokemon videogames- they're fun, entertaining, and you can do so many different things in them. Much better that the televisions shows, for sure.

    While I was pondering how to tie in my nerdy-ness into a physics post, I came up with this. Hopefully it's not too terrible :D

    So, to begin, let us dive into the game itself-- literally.

    picture.php?albumid=41&pictureid=329

    Within this "small" (by the standards when it was first made, at least) pokemon Gold cartridge lies a mess of wires, chips, resisters, etc, and the battery that powers it.

    It's a complex circut, basically!

    When inserted into the game boy, a current is sent out into the game, reading all the information stored on it as the game loads up.

    Physics is why it works. Physics is the reason that the electrical currents move through the game, why the save data is read, and why you can even play it on the gamboy in the first place. End of story. Not a single videogame would work without physics.

    While playing the actual coded game, as well, physics is at work. In some games, logic doesn't seem to be at play- the physics of it doesn't match up. Pokemon games are actually fairly realistic, compared to some other video games. When you jump off the ledge, you fall down. When you throw the pokeball, it doesn't float into the sky- it continues on it's path and hits the pokemon. In some of the newer games, when crossing a log, you can fall off. I may be tired and rambling at this point, but that's because I can. In some games, like Harvest Moon, there is no logic. Crops growing in less than a month? Cows getting pregnent with a potion? Teleporting?

    I dare you to go and play one of your videogames and analize it. Is the physic within it logical, or not? Take some time to take in the world around you- none of it would be there without physics. It's just that important!

  8. So today we had our Regents exam and I had yet to complete my last blog post. As I was sitting and waiting to be dismissed, I was thinking about how hungry I was (as usual). It then occurred to me that physics was involved in my hunger! How do you ask? Let me explain.

    Well, starting with last night, I had lacrosse practice. This required me to use mechanical energy. I then slept to regain my mechanical energy from chemical energy. I then added more chemical energy by eating some chicken pot pie for breakfast. This energy was then converted to mechanical energy so I could take my Regents exam this afternoon. Once I had exerted all of my stored energy, I was hungry for some more chemical energy. Thus, I needed more physics.

    Not everyone immediately associates being hungry with physics, but as a successful and educated physics student, it was the first thing I thought of!

  9. jaygilbert
    Latest Entry

    physics can be found in everything, even the weather!! All precipitation contains elements of physics, however rain is perhaps the most interesting. Rain falls at what is called terminal velocity. this is when an object reaches a cirten speed and stops accelerating. The acceleration around earth is 9.81 meters per second^2. There is a very interesting physics consept as to why the rain water doesnt have a more devistating effect.

    most rain drops fall at a velocity of about 18 mph. getting hit with a rock going this speed would be a much different experience than being hit with a rain drop. the reason rain drops arent painful is due to the fact that they have a smaller mass. getting hit with a 4kg rock is a greater force, this is because the force is equal to the mass multiplied by the acceleration (g). Because the rain drops have a next to negligable masses the force that they impact earth with is very little and therefore doesnt cause more damage when it impacts earth.

    images?q=tbn:ANd9GcTzPhOCO_KqA06P1HZf2e89ennd0jJ1asAhvxML-ARBZ5DLrGEZ

    the shape of a rain drop is also an interesting and under studied phenominon. they are not tear drop shaped, but instead most of them look like small flattened hamburger buns. this is due to their size, bigger or smaller rain drops actually for different shapes depending on their air resistance due to their sizes. overall, rain is just an example of how almost every aspect of our world is determined by physics, even mother natures miracles!

  10. When one plays a guitar, it is so important to remember all the physics behind it. Waves have a lot to do with the sound we hear from them. For example, without a large amplitude, it would not be heard. And when one changes notes, it changes the frequency that is heard. Because the wave is longitudinal, it needs a medium to travel through which is why in a vacuum you would not be able to hear someome playing. The pulses vibrate parallel to the wave because in a longitudinal wave thats their path.

    Also, playing the guitar has a lot to do with mechanical energy as one strums the strings. Without the physical motion of the player, there would be no sound. Overtones are a cool thing string instruments have that have a lot to di with waves, which is another physics point!

    Next time one picks up a guitar remember all the physics behind it!!!

  11. I was thinking about going on vacation since it is now summer and that lead me to the question of how to airplanes fly. I have come to find that it is the result of Bernoulli's experiment that resulted in the founding that if air speeds up the pressure is lowered. This explains how the wings are lifted. As the air goes faster over the top of the wing,it creates the region of low pressure.

    After finding out this informetion I came to the question of, why does the air go faster over the top of the wing? I came to the answer that the distance that the air must travel is directly related to it's speed.

    The avergage speeds of the air over the top and under the wing are determined by measuring the distances therefore we can calculate the speed using our formulas. From Bernoulli's experiment it is stated that we can find the pressure forces and therefore the lift.

    A wing generating lift is used through Newton's first and third laws. The first law states that an object in motion tends to stay in motion and object in rest tends to stay in rest unless a force is acted upon it. His third law states that for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

    Hope you enjoy this post!

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    Physics is in dodgeball no matter what you may think. There is kinematics along with work and energy. This is almost all in the throw of the dodgeball and how you hard and fast you can throw the dodgeball.

    dodgeball-logo-right.png

    The energy is used for the ball through the air. if you throw the ball it has a certain kinetic energy as it flies towards its target. The energy of this is based on how fast you can get the ball with the initial velocity and the kinetic will remain the same if you neglect air resistance. the work is shown through how much you move your arm and how far the ball has to fly. the ball is displaced and the force you throw with is the amount of work the ball made. there is also kinematics because you can use it to determine the distance that the ball will travel after you release it from your hand.

    this all shows that there is more physics in dodgeball than most people realized. the kinematics will show distance and velocity. the work will show how much was done by the person and the ball through the air. and finally there was energy because that there was kinetic and potential along with internal.

  12. blog-0336975001371137334.jpgIn many of our video games and even in real life we sometimes come into contact with a hunting rifle or sniper rifle. For some games its just point and shoot and you hit him but for some games and in real life you have to compensate for the drop of the bullet. But did you also know that, that bullet you just shot and the case of that bullet as it flies out are hitting the ground at the same time? But back to the drop of the bullet when you fire. When you fire really any gun you have to aim a bit up from your target depending on the distance you are at. Gravity pulls the bullet down even if it might seem that it would take awhile as the bullet comes out of the gun gravity is acting on it and the bullet is being dragged down but slower that other objects because of the speed it is at. So next time you go hunting and you think that you are going to get the animal right in the sweet spot try aiming a little higher then where you want it to go, then it might be right on.

    But to come back to something, the drop of the bullet and the shell of the bullet. These two things drop and hit the ground at the same time. As you shoot the bullet goes flying off at high speeds, but when you pull the bolt back on the rifle and the case flies out and hits the ground, both parts of the bullet have hit the ground. They are technically experiencing the same thing its just the bullet shot is experiencing it over a greater distance with a greater speed.

  13. SO, many people have many different ways to study for the regents physics exam including myself and my friends.

    First i picked kids from the AP track to help me study for physics because i knew that they would be able to teach me a lot more than if i were studying alone. They did teach me a lot!

    I drove to pick up Bakari from his house using my car Stanley. Stanley changed potential energy to kinetic energy as it changed gas to moving fuel. I had told Alan, our other study party member, to arrive at two, and i arrived at Bakari's at 1:50. It is safe to say i increased my velocity from the trip to his house to the trip back home. I accelerated uniformly until Bakari told me that i could just use the cruise control. My cruise control turned on and would not turn off until i tapped on the break. This instantly reminded me of the law that an object will stay in motion unless acted upon by an outside force, this outside force being my foot on the break.

    After running into many red lights we turned onto the bridge which had a different road surface than the street. This caused greater frictional force against the car which made my acceleration increase so that i could get past the high coefficient of friction.

    When we finally arrived at my house we had to put the top back up on my convertible. This was physics in itself as well. The button i pressed used mechanical energy to get the top closed so we could go inside and study.

    Of course studying with boys they wanted to listen to music. This music would produce sound waves from my computer and into the awaiting ear drums of us studiers. What they didn't know is my sister was down in the basement practicing for her singing jury. Before we could turn on our music we had to figure out how to block out Taylors music. The sound waves were traveling from the basement up to the living room by using diffraction. Her sound waves went from her, across the basement, around the corner, up the stairs, around another corner and into our ears. Very impressive!

    Quickly enough the boys grew hungry. I, being the lovely hostess, offered them chicken wing dip. I had to warm it up first in the microwave. These waves created heat and energy to make the chicken wing dip at a good temperature for eating. The mechanical energy of the boys chewing was only accompanied by a refreshing drink.

    Both boys wanted straws to drink their beverages with. The straws in the can was immediately refracted so we couldn't tell where it was in the liquid.

    The door opened, my door consisting of potential energy turned to kinetic as Sam entered my house. He ran in, pushed me to the ground and sat on me. his momentum before equaled his momentum afterwards as he tickled me until i got up an hid behind Alan. I couldn't replicate his force by any means because my mass was much less than his however i could remove the attraction between us by moving away from him. Our distance increased which created a smaller force of gravity between us.

    Alan quickly helped change the subject by swinging his iPod around and around on the wire. Bakari and I were quick to analyze this as having centripetal acceleration moving toward Alan's hand that was spinning the wire. We said that it had a uniform velocity and if we had a timer on our hands or a ruler we would be able to figure out the acceleration.

    Sam also assisted us with this experiment as he swung his keys in a circle around his hand. He however experimented with the idea that if you were to cut the string the velocity would shoot outside of the circle. He unexpectedly let go of his keys allowing us to see which way the velocity was being allowed to go. The keys shot from his hand and into the wall behind him.

    All too soon the boys had to leave, however Its safe to say that although they didn't realize it, these boys helped me a lot more than they thought they would.

  14. Kaleidoscopes use light and mirrors to reflect objects that create patterns. There are multitudes of different varieties and types, but they all follow the same basic principles of physics. To make a kaleidoscope, you would need some type of round, hollow material and two to four mirrors to put inside of it. Aluminum foil can also be used as a reflector.

    On one end of a kaleidoscope, there is an object container that holds the objects to be reflected. Then this can be closed off with plastic or glass. This layer of clear material not only holds the objects in, but also filters light through to reflect off of the objects. Some versions of the kaleidoscope toy rotate to easier change the position of the objects located inside.

    When you look through the hole of a kaleidoscope, light filters through the glass or plastic on the end of the device and then illuminates the objects and reflects them off of the mirrors or other reflective material. Your eye then sees these bouncing reflections, which creates the patterns that you see. This simple, but fascinating toy has brought joy and wonder into the lives of people for hundreds of years.

  15. As summer gets closer, the weather gets warmer and everyone itches to get outside. One of my personal favorite things to do on those hot summer days is to go swimming! So many people enjoy it and it is something that they do all the time, but the majority of people don't stop to think about all of the physics that is involved in it. And there is a lot!

    First, the most obvious is the difference in gravity. When you are just walking around normally, you stay on the ground. You never begin to float towards the sky because of the force of gravity on earth. The force of gravity is 9.81m/s^2. However, as you may know, when you are in a pool or the ocean it is very hard to stay on the ground because there is nothing pulling you down. But you are still on the earth... so how can that be possible? Although the force of gravity is the same, there is an additional force acting in the water called buoyancy. This means that when an object is put in water, it will displace the amount of water equal to its volume. This is why objects appear to be lighter when they are in water.

    There is also a lot of resistance in water. Water is about 1000 times more resistant than air and about 91% of a persons energy is lost through drag. Therefore, when swimming competitively, swimmers need to maximize their streamline. They can do this by wearing swim caps. As you can see, there is a lot of physics in swimming. So next time you jump in the pool, think about all of the physics that is going on! Thanks for reading :)

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