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Kerbal Physics for a Cookie 2

{I added a second cookie Q to buy you guys more time. Hopefully Charlie won't answer both before someone else in the class answers one..} You are a Kerbal physicist for Kow Jumperd Over the Mun, a company that excels in anything spacey or astronaut-y. After ending an argument between two colleagues, you decide to take a lunch break. The cafeteria guy, Louie Eeloo, has a thing for riddles, which started out amusing and grew annoying as the years passed. You were hoping that the line would be l

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Kerbal Physics for a Cookie

You are a Kerbal physicist for Kow Jumped Over the Mun, a company that excels in anything spacey or astronaut-y. Your co-worker, Kirby McKerbin, is arguing with the desk clerk Moony Muni. Because you clearly have nothing better to do until next launch, you decide to listen in. Kirby is absolutely convinced that if he were to oscillate a pendulum on Kerbin, move it to Mun, and repeat the same occilation, the period of the pendulum on Mun would be roughly 3.5 times that of the period of the pendul

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Infrasound

Infrasound is sound with a frequency lower than 20 Hz. Human hearing registers sounds from roughly 20 to Hz 20,000, though under certain circumstances the body will hear/feel sound at a lower frequency than 20Hz. Though the human ear does not normally register infrasound, these inaudible waves effect our everyday lives. [ATTACH=CONFIG]530[/ATTACH] In Nature: Infrasound is produced naturally by severe weather and other forms of nature. Storms, thunder, volcanic activity, earthquakes,

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

How to put eqns/fancy symbols into your blog

Do you find your blogs boring, drab and in need of fanciness? Do you think that int(x^2) is an acceptable substitute for ? Because the APlusphysics site has undergone improvements, I think that our blogs' equation quality should improve as well. ;D A little birdie (Mr. Fullerton) told me about this great tool called a latex editor. One site to go to is http://www.codecogs.com/latex/eqneditor.php , which you don't have to download and it's not blocked by the school. It's a site where you can

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

How to become an autodidact

How to become an autodidact (defn: self-directed learner) :einstein) Monday, we were given a few packets of work, some written directions and a "finish this before the test next week." Weird. A class with no teacher? A few groups popped up to grab a computer, others buried their noses in the textbook, and some started chatting leisurely with friends. It's not that we don't have a teacher, it's just that for the next few days, we're our own teachers. For a few of us (including myself), th

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Happy New Year!

HAPPY NEW (school) YEAR EVERYBODY!!! I'm super excited for some serious Physics C. Just set up my account! I found this comic online and thought it would be a great way to break the ice: Hee hee. And of course I'll site my oh-so-credible source: http://memebase.cheezburger.com ...Although they did spell cheeseburger wrong. ^-^; And look, I found a fencing smiley face!:fight) --Geek out!

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Happy Halloween!

[ATTACH=CONFIG]506[/ATTACH][ATTACH=CONFIG]507[/ATTACH] So. I was thinking of what to carve on my pumpkin earlier and thought, "What's something that'll scare the pants off of anyone, even high schoolers?" Bingo, air resistance. Many of us were shaking in our boots when Mr. Fullerton derived a few drag-related equations, but looking back they're not too bad right? Here's a little review. That long page really boils down to a few key equations: Air resistance = Fdrag = bv = cv2 , where b

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Fempto Photography Captures Light in Motion

So far, no other particle has been able to move at the speed of light. However, human beings are capable of seeing light move. Ramesh Raskar and his team at MIT have developed a camera capable of capturing light at 1 trillion frames per second. This method, called fempto photography, can take slow motion videos of light in motion. Watch the video for a better explanation but for those of you in a rush below is a summary of MIT's amazing research. As shown in the video, Raskar uses a laser to

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Family Guy Physics

Family Guy isn't exactly school appropriate in most cases, but it is, however, physics appropriate. In one episode, Brian (the dog) educates Peter (the tubby man) on his weight issue. Brian claims that Peter has his own gravitational pull, and continues to demonstrate this by placing an apple nearby his stomach. The fruit then assumes orbit directed around Peter's abdomen. ...For those of you who are not familliar with the episode, here is a not-so-legally posted, poor quality youtube video f

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Electricity in the Brain

More electricity-themed blog posts! Neurons are cells in the nervous system. This cell transfers information via chemical and electrical signals. The long, stem-like part of a nerve cell is called the axon. In the human body, the axons that run from your spinal chord to your feet can be over a meter long. Electrical pulses are transferred through the axon down to the neurotransmitter molecules. The membrane potential of the average neuron cell is between -60 and -80 mV when the cell is not t

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Electric organ

Hi everyone! I thought this would be applicable since we're in the electricity and magnetism portion of the year In electric fish, such as an eel or a ray, there is a body part called an "electric organ." This mass of muscle and/or nerve cells produce an electric current when the fish sees fit. It is used for protection, navigation, communication and sometimes (but not often) against prey. The organ itself consists of a group of connected electrocytes, through which the current passes throug

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Cows, cars and calipers

I'll set the scene: It's a dark night and the fog is thick as soup. You drive along in your pink jeep, hoping to get home in time for dinner (your favorite!), when a white mass appears in the road. A COW!:eek: You thrust the break pedal to the ground, and your wrangler just stops short of the bovine J-walker. What is the only thing that came between you and a pile of ground beef? Physics is the hero of this story-- specifically friction. A car's breaking system is usually one of t

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Cookie question: Military Physics

A friend returned from training for the air force and told me about some of the crazy things that he and his comrades would do to pass the time. Some of these included taping each other to the ceiling and human-drawn chariot races, but one of the most messy and fun instances he described was a hallway slip n' slide. True story: he and his hall mates put towels to the bottom of their sleeping quarter doorways, filled the hall with soap and water and proceeded to slide down the hallway as though i

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Coat hanger solenoid

As Goalkeeper0 and Mr. Fullerton suggested, I decided to give the soap-and-water approach to understanding flux a shot. If you'd like to try this experiment but can't find one of those ancient metal coat hangers, here's a different approach: >>>Credit to Goalkeeper0<<< I bent a coat hanger into a solenoid with 5(ish) loops and filled the dish basin in our sink with soapy water. I'm not sure if it's because here wasn't enough soap in the water or a different factor, but the

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Break is fun!

SO, because everyone else decided to take a break, my brain also decided to go off on holiday for a while. In that case, I've decided to make this blog post 100% fun (yet still on topic), and what's more fun and physics related than comics? Hope these tickle your funny bone, have a great break everyone!!! ...And finally, a comic that Mr. Fullerton would enjoy: Have a great break! Make sure to relax (and pretend that midterms aren't coming up)! --Alphageek

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

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