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First Blog

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The Physics of Procrastination!

I'm sitting in the commons. Enjoying my Friday morning, of course. But suddenly, I am awakened to the thought of physics. Not actual physics, but a deadline! I needed to finish my blog posts! And now I sit, with two other helpless Physics C students, as we plow through some blogs. As I sit, inactive, I burn about 100 calories per hour. Which, suprisingly, is not too bad. So I'm actually excercising. If you just sit, however, you burn a suprising 65 calories per hour - the energy it t

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

What is a "g"?

Considering this is a physics website, everyone that reads this post will have probably already known what "g-force" is. But I'm going to talk about it anyway. Whether you're sitting, standing, or walking while reading this - you're experiencing about +1g. All that means is that you weigh exactly what you weigh. So, if you weigh 150 pounds and you're experiencing +1g, that means you weigh 150 pounds. Simple. But what if you stood upside down? Are you still under +1g? It sure does

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

Why Asiana Airlines Flight 214 Fell Short of the Runway

On July 6th, 2013, an incident occurred that could have been avoided. A massive (up to 297,550 kg) Boeing 777-200ER simply fell out of the sky, not even a mile from the runway's threshold. The 777, carrying 291 people, smacked into the seawall, immediately ripping the tail section off of the fuselage. Directly causing 2 deaths, the crash was the first fatal accident involving this type of aircraft. Generally, when an aircraft has an outstanding safety record (like the 777), accident

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

Photonic Boom?

We've all heard of the famous "sonic boom" when a jet or rocket passes overhead at a speed greater than the speed of sound. Sound waves are fundamentally compressed tightly behind the object, creating the "bang". But if that is possible with sound, could it be possible with light? Yup. "Photonic Booms", as they're called, are created in situations where light waves aren't given enough time to radiate out into their own paths; they're constricted and are densely packed into each other. T

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

A Penny can kill you! (And other physics myths)

We've all heard the rumor that a penny (dropped from the top of the Empire State Building, or any skyscraper) could kill you if you were an unlucky soul at the bottom. Unfortunately, that doesn't exactly work out. The solution is easy: get rid of air. But that's not practical. So how fast would a penny actually fall? The answer is found when we consider the idea of terminal velocity; the point at which drag force equals the force of gravity. Although asymptotically approached, acceleration,

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

Life would suck without friction

Imagine living life as a frictionless surface. Imagine getting out of bed, letting your feet hit the ground, and eternally slipping...until you can grab something to stop you, correct? Chances are, your hand would slip as well. Friction is extremely important...and it makes our lives livable. The coefficient of friction of rubber shoe tread (on dry asphalt) is an astonishing .9! We don't notice it, but our shoes are very frictional. The MythBusters did a segment on friction when they buste

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

How do aircraft stop?

The average aircraft will usually suck up a couple thousand feet in order to stop. The average single piston engine aircraft will take less, and a 747 will take much more (>5000ft). This creates a problem. Aircraft have insane amounts of momentum upon touchdown, and pavement isn't cheap. In addition, we can't have "mobile" airports for military use - so how are we able to deploy combat ready aircraft to anywhere in the world within a matter of hours? Well, we made mobile airports. And,

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

The first of many blogs...

To be honest, I was hesitant when I was asked to take AP Physics B two years ago. I certainly had no idea what to expect. As it turns out, I wasn't disappointed. The class itself was intriguing and it motivated me to continue my education in Physics. As a student pilot, I became interested in how the fluid dynamics actually played out in the air. Last year gave me some important insight on that topic. I became interested in physics beyond the areas of last year, leading me to enroll in this

bobbyburns

bobbyburns

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