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Gravity + Plants = A Necessary Combo

This past Saturday before I got sick, I helped a fellow Physics C student plant a community garden for a service project.  While I was laying down rows of tulip bulbs and fertilizer, I got to thinking about plants and how important gravity is to their growth.  The roots of plants grow down into the soil in the direction of the gravitational field; plants need soil for nutrients and water, which are key elements for their survival.  Without gravity, roots wouldn't have a direction to grow in, nor

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An Unfortunate Incident with Friction

Last Wednesday, my tennis team went to individual sectionals.  While we ended up losing 7-10, it was not before I ended up badly scraping my knee against the court.  See, the opponent hit a great shot, and as I accelerated and bent low to hit the shot, my knee came into contact with the tennis court.  The force I was applying due to my sprint was in the direction of where the ball was, yet the frictional force from the court on my knee was in the opposite direction, causing a net force on my kne

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More on Tennis....Clay Courts!

My last blog post was about the impact of rain on the coefficient of friction on a tennis court, and Mr. Baker commented about how different it is to play on clay tennis courts; I totally agree!  I rarely play on clay courts, but when I do, it is not at all an enjoyable experience because the ball does not seem to travel as fast.  I decided to find out why.  Turns out that clay courts have a higher coefficient of friction than the grass at Wimbledon or other regulation courts.  Turns out that th

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Tennis and Rain

This past week, my tennis team had its final matches before sectionals begin tomorrow.  However, due to heavy rainfall, several of our matches were either rescheduled or postponed.  Naturally, I thought that there had to be some physics dealing with the impact of rain on the total force of friction when one plays on a court.  Turns out that a liquid substance like water decreases the coefficient of friction of the surface it is on (in this case the tennis courts).  Because tennis requires a lot

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aweld98

First Physics Blog

This is my first blog for AP Physics C, which I will hopefully update weekly throughout the upcoming school year.  Some of my activities outside of school include playing tennis, practicing the violin, and participating in the theater program at school.  When I am not participating in any of these activities, I am listening to music or hanging out with friends.  I have one younger sister who is now a freshman in high school, and she's pretty cool.  I am taking AP-C Physics because I was successf

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aweld98

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