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Coors Field: Why elevation doesn't always help the home team

Sports Authority Field at Mile High doesn't have that name for just any reason.  Home to the Denver Broncos, it is exactly one mile above sea level and is surrounded by the thinnest air in the NFL.  As far as football goes, thin air really benefits the home team in many more ways than expected.  Other than the obvious facts that kicks and passes go farther, daily practice at that elevation can make a football team extremely effective when it comes to the physical side of the game.  When the Bron

ajgartland22

ajgartland22

The Physics Behind Catching a Baseball

The beauty of baseball is the fact that any single detail of the game to can be analyzed way more than most people want to know.  Everything from the moisture of the grass to how a player catches a ball can play huge roles in a game.  Even in something as small as catching a ball, physics can be found in not only the method of catching but in the actual construction of the baseball glove.  During a professional baseball game, players routinely throw the ball at speeds approaching 100 mph and can

ajgartland22

ajgartland22

STATCAST- When Physics Meet Baseball

Well if my last blog didn't get you interested about baseball hopefully this one will... Introduced to 3 pilot stadiums in 2014 and now in its 2nd full season of league- wide use, STATCAST is yet another way for baseball (and physics) fans to geek out about anything that goes on in between the chalk lines.  Essentially, STATCAST uses common methods of tracking and, with the help of computer and human input, creates powerful graphics, videos and analysis in a matter of minutes.  This system

ajgartland22

ajgartland22

Shoot Your Grade Lab Update

Last week our physics class failed at a single attempt to calculate the horizontal distance traveled by a projectile launched from a projectile launcher.  After one test launch, we were required to calculate the delta x of a ball launched at an angle of -4 degrees.  I think the biggest factor contributing to our failure was the lack of effective communication and teamwork.  When it came time to gather values to calculate the distance, the main form of communication was that of yelling louder tha

ajgartland22

ajgartland22

The Curveball

Baseball.  Often dismissed by many because of how "slow" and "boring" it is.  This being said, anybody who knows anything about physics should strongly disagree with these statements.  The truth is, every 15- 20 seconds, a ball flies towards the batter travelling 80+  mph and curving up to a foot in one direction all the while a batter is trying to hit that ball to distances exceeding 400 feet.  The most interesting piece of this intense chain of events is the movement of the ball, which require

ajgartland22

ajgartland22

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