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15 Min of Fame

Yesterday (June 8th) was my 15 min of fame at IHS for which I demonstarted a model rocket launch for my English class. The class was extremely excited and thought that the idea was great and took a lot away from the experience. The main theme for this launch, however, was wind. The wind was blowing from the SW at about 10 mph, which wreaks havoc for a small model rocket on a short field widthwise. As a result, I launched on the very southern edge of the field and when the parachute deployed, it

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MIT Momentum Lesson

This is an online video of an MIT momentum lecture that I found, and that I found to be quite useful for what we learned in class. The lecture focuses on everything that we talked about in AP-C, but it was very interesting to hear the lesson from another professor's perspective. In this video are the definition of momentum, how it relates to force, as well as conservation of momentum and kinetic energy. One thing that I found particularly useful in the video were the derivations that the profess

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More Trekky Stuff

Since the unintentional theme of my posts so far have revolved around Star Trek, I have decided to just go looking for stuff from the episodes that poses some amount of plausibility in our future. Today's topic: Invisibility Cloak Apparently the technology isn't far off. Scientists have developed a material on a microscopic scale that they believe renders things "invisible" through it's ability to bend light. The process is called reverse refraction. You know how when you have a straw in a g

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Ion engine could one day power 39-day trips to Mars

Here's something that I found online that looked pretty interesting. I'm a star wars junky (as well as star trek if you couldn't tell by my avatar...) and this technology is used pretty consistently in the movies. Hard to believe that it could be reality. In fact, ion engines are already in use today, but not over a wide-spread basis. Pretty awesome way to get some propulsion... Just check out the attached URL to learn more and see some video clips Trivia Fact: The "bad guys" in star wars fl

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New Subatomic Particle!!!!!!

Physicists at Fermilab might have discovered a new particle that could be the most influential discovery of the past 50 years. Here's a link to the article from the New York Times.... http://www.nytimes.com/2011/04/06/science/06particle.html?_r=4&hp

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A Challenge for anyone brave enough to try...

Here's a complex physics problem for you, with a real world application. About a year ago, my mom was in a car accident that prevents her still from playing the harp as her profession. In order to return to work, however, her physical therapist needs to know how much force it takes to pull a harp string (sufficient enough force to produce sound) so that he can tell if she is ready to exert that amount of force regularly. One might think that this would be a fairly simple SHM problem, but it's no

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Warp Drive

While I'm on a kick here (hard to guess what I find interesting right?), here's something I found on a totally different blog site about the possibilities of traveling faster than the speed of light. There is a very convincing theory, too bad no one knows where to get the energy.... And yes FizziksGuy, it uses "string guess". I'm very sorry. Here's the link: http://news.discovery.com/space/warp-drive-spaceship-engine.html

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How much would this hurt?

In inspiration of our "shocking" in class demonstrations today, I felt the need for a random Google search. Can you Tesla coil??? The following image shows the Tesla coil at the Mid-America Science Museum in Hot Springs. It produces about 1,500,000 volts of electricity and is deemed the most powerful on earth. Anybody want to do the light bulb experiment with this?

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We Have Lift-Off...

I recently travled down to Iroquois middle school to take advantage of a non-windy day to launch my favorite model rocket, and explore some physics in the process. The winds were coming from the South at about 7 mph, so the East end of the field had to be utilized for the launch, and everything went flawlessly because of planning ahead in this fashion. Some specs of the solid fuel engine I used are as follows: The average impulse is 5N/sec Maximum thrust was 12.1N Time to rise was about 3 s

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Help needed!!

I posted a thread on the homework forum, but no one has responded, so I'm hoping someone can help here. I need help for questions 2 and 8 and the most recent Phsycis-C Web Assign!!! For question 8, how do you find parts 4 and 5?

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Don't underestimate the value of technology!!

I have just recently missed a full week of Physics lectures, among other things, and thought that I would drown in a sea of confusion when I got home, but alas no!! The online daily updates and postings of class lectures have proven themselves invaluable to helping em stay on track. So you may ask, why did I bother posting this? I have three reasons: 1) They actually work!! For anybody that misses class I highly suggest referring to the blog and daily updates. They also come in extreme handy

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