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Impulse and Momentum

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Guest Keri

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This video demonstrates perfectly what we have learned about all week in AP-C Physics. It first starts off by saying impulse equals force times time. Then it goes on to say that that all is equal to the change in momentum. Those are the formulas we have been working with the past week, which we all call "Jimpulse." The example in the video is great in that it talks about the force applied by a bat to a baseball, and why bunts work the way they do. I always knew that bunts obviously make the ball go a shorter distance, but this video made me think about it in a physics way. Since the time the ball is touching the bat is less, the impulse will be less, and therefore, goes a short distance. In order to get a home run, and to maximize the impulse, you need to keep the bat in contact with the ball for as long as possible (have a good follow through). It all makes sense now to physics!

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Blake was also explaining to me today about the follow through. In all sports when you follow through, the impulse increases because the time that you are in contact with the object increases. This is true for many sports like baseball and golf. If you follow through on your swing, the time the force acts on the object increases, which means a greater impulse. If impulse increases, considering mass stays the same, the velocity increases. Assuming you arent changing the angle of contact, for maximum ball flight you want to maximize velocity by increasing impulse!

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Blake was also explaining to me today about the follow through. In all sports when you follow through, the impulse increases because the time that you are in contact with the object increases. This is true for many sports like baseball and golf. If you follow through on your swing, the time the force acts on the object increases, which means a greater impulse. If impulse increases, considering mass stays the same, the velocity increases. Assuming you arent changing the angle of contact, for maximum ball flight you want to maximize velocity by increasing impulse!

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Cool! I never thought of follow-through that way. I always assumed that the mindset of following through just created a more powerful swing in the first place, but this makes much more sense. So does a pitcher with longer arms have an advantage over a shorter-armed pitcher? (Strictly talking maximum ball velocity)

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Consider sports equipment design. A jai alai basket delivers a high amount of force and is curved not only for accuracy and catching, but also to increase the duration of the impulse.

It's no wonder these balls can reach hundreds of miles an hour of speed.

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So I read both blogs that have to do with follow through increasing momentum so far, and as an avid badminton player (don't hate on my whiteness) I'm starting to wonder how professionals reach 100 mph speeds with shuttlecocks that have a great amount of drag and if the racket only comes into contact with the shuttlecock a short time.

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Guest Rellseli66

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If you watch the slow moe on the baseball hits, we see that the ball bounces off the bat relatively quickly, and so a follow through does not increase the time the force is put upon the ball, so with that in mind why follow through, the ball bounces off the bat and then they still swing another 90 degrees or so.

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Could it be that a follow through just ensures the player doesn't anticipate the close and pull up, decreasing force on the ball?

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