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The Reichenbach Fall

thatnewjunior

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If you are a Sherlockian, you know this one ain't gonna be easy.

The Reichenbach Fall is the name of the BBC Sherlock epiosde in which Sherlock Holmes *SPOILERS* jumps from the roof of St Bartholomew's Hospital to save those he cares about - chiefly John Watson - from the wrath of Jim Moriarty. Dr. Watson rushes to Sherlock's lifeless body, collapses in disbelief and grief and fear, but has the sense to take the consulting detective's pulse before they are torn apart. Sherlock Holmes was dead. John watched him jump, heard his voice on the phone right before he did, he saw the body, and he felt the lack of a pulse. And yet, after a frankly rather depressing scene with John talking to Sherlock's grave, the classic theme returns as the camera pans to follow John, and suddenly there stands Sherlock, watching from the trees. Alive.

The hospital was four stories, each with tall ceilings. There is no way that man could have survived, no matter how large his Mind Palace (*cough* or his ego *cough*). From such a height, he would not have reached full speed, but he would be going with high enough a velocity to break bones on the ground. High enough a velocity to die.

The fandom - as well as characters from the show itself - created numerous explanations as to how Sherlock could have survived. A trampoline? A bungy cord? A manican? A serious of improbable kisses (sorry, fangirls... no)? The creators of the show never actually let on how he survived his fall (curse you, Mark Gatiss and Steven Moffat!), leaving fans to ponder and wonder and awe. And await the next season. It snowed in Egypt. Before the next season of Sherlock. You don't understand. It snows in Egypt just about... never. This random yet true fact brought to you by Fiona. Enjoy. And wait for Sherlock.



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