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FizziksGuy

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Everything posted by FizziksGuy

  1. Episode 12. The Millikan Experiment: A dramatic recreation of Millikan's classic oil-drop experiment to determine the charge of a single electron.“The Mechanical Universe,” is a critically-acclaimed series of 52 thirty-minute videos covering the basic topics of an introductory university physics course.Each program in the series opens and closes with Caltech Professor David Goodstein providing philosophical, historical and often humorous insight into the subject at hand while lecturing to his freshman physics class. The series contains hundreds of computer animation segments, created by Dr. James F. Blinn, as the primary tool of instruction. Dynamic location footage and historical re-creations are also used to stress the fact that science is a human endeavor. The series was originally produced as a broadcast telecourse in 1985 by Caltech and Intelecom, Inc. with program funding from the Annenberg/CPB Project.The online version of the series is sponsored by the Information Science and Technology initiative at Caltech. http://ist.caltech.edu©1985 California Institute of Technology, The Corporation for Community College Television, and The Annenberg/CPB Project
  2. Name: Mechanical Universe: The Millikan Experiment (12) Category: Electricity & Magnetism Date Added: 2017-02-07 Submitter: FizziksGuy Episode 12. The Millikan Experiment: A dramatic recreation of Millikan's classic oil-drop experiment to determine the charge of a single electron.“The Mechanical Universe,” is a critically-acclaimed series of 52 thirty-minute videos covering the basic topics of an introductory university physics course.Each program in the series opens and closes with Caltech Professor David Goodstein providing philosophical, historical and often humorous insight into the subject at hand while lecturing to his freshman physics class. The series contains hundreds of computer animation segments, created by Dr. James F. Blinn, as the primary tool of instruction. Dynamic location footage and historical re-creations are also used to stress the fact that science is a human endeavor. The series was originally produced as a broadcast telecourse in 1985 by Caltech and Intelecom, Inc. with program funding from the Annenberg/CPB Project.The online version of the series is sponsored by the Information Science and Technology initiative at Caltech. http://ist.caltech.edu©1985 California Institute of Technology, The Corporation for Community College Television, and The Annenberg/CPB Project Mechanical Universe: The Millikan Experiment (12)
  3. Good Afternoon, This is designed as a problem to compliment the Regents and Honors programs of study with this website (hence its location in the Regents and Honors folder), in which the coefficient of friction for wood on wood is a given and is designed to be looked up in a reference table (see link below). And yes, the first box would experience friction, however, based on the problem statement, you know the velocity of the first block as it contacts the second block, therefore there's no need to calculate a reduction in velocity prior to impact. Then, following the impact, and knowing the coefficient of kinetic friction of wood on wood, you can solve for the horizontal launch velocity using Newton's 2nd Law, at which point this becomes a projectile problem. Links to reference table with friction information: http://www.aplusphysics.com/courses/honors/dynamics/friction.html I would agree, however, that if you didn't know the coefficient of friction, you'd be stuck.
  4. FizziksGuy

    Waffles are the best

    I think it's safe to say you've never made waffles and pancakes? One is definitely faster, but it's not the waffles...
  5. Hi Gio. APlusPhysics is just a single person, me, so that's pretty easy to answer. They are on my to-do list, but are at best a month or two away. Note that most of this material is covered to at least some depth in the "Honors" physics video series. Hope that helps! -Dan
  6. Spent TONS of times in clean rooms, most of which at a cleanliness level thousands of times cleaner than surgical suites. There is a TON of money and engineering spent on creating cleanrooms -- fantastic career opportunities!
  7. FizziksGuy

    Squats Baby!!!!

    And since it's about baby squats... gotta start 'em young!
  8. FizziksGuy

    The kronwall

    That does NOT look pleasant...
  9. Wow.... now that had to be embarrassing.
  10. It's all about conservation of energy!
  11. FizziksGuy

    The Serenity of Snow

    Then they become your former friend?
  12. FizziksGuy

    Blogmas Day 4

    You are on quite the roll here...
  13. From the AP Physics 1 Essentials book... a tricky question. For B, because you're passing through the zero point, you find the energy going from 3 m/s to 0 m/s, and then the energy going from 0 m/s to -3 m/s, and add them. Same idea with D. It requires you to think past the standard definition and understand what sort of work must be done to accomplish the feat.
  14. You could even calculate the moment of inertia depending on load size!
  15. Well done -- all sorts of physics in swimming!
  16. This is exactly my agenda with my little girls tomorrow... rake leaves, watch them jump in them. Lather, rinse, repeat.
  17. Cool concept, but the game itself isn't tremendously interesting -- seems like a ton of potential that wasn't executed well.
  18. Amazing what detail they can embed into the latest video games. Impressive...
  19. FizziksGuy

    The Hook Grip

    Yessir... amazing how much more efficient you can be with the hook grip, even though it feels so uncomfortable and wrong when you first start using it!
  20. FizziksGuy

    Squats Baby!!!!

    Back squats are my fave as well... but 405. Still amazed, though, even for a movement that looks so simple and like it just requires raw power -- just how much technique plays a role in hitting that personal high lift. I was capped in the 360 range until I adjusted my foot position and hand position just a tiny bit, then all of a sudden 400 was in reach. Applying the force at just the right spot to maximize your efforts is SOOOO important!

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