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B-Reezy64

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Everything posted by B-Reezy64

  1. Once again, it's B-Reezy with another sick story that will knock your socks off. So the squad and I went out and bought some slingshots at Harbor Freight Tools. I took an acorn and I put it in my slingshot and shot it at my friend's head. It apparently hurt him a lot. He volunteered to allow me to throw one at his head next as hard as I could and see how much it hurt. It hurt less (but of course it still hurt a lot because I am swole (and more so than Delaney)). This, much like my phone experiment (all of my blog posts will probably be the same) proves the effect of applied force on an object.
  2. Hello everyone, today, I would like to share with you a very nautical experiment that I conducted outside of school. I wore safety glasses and gloves for protection by the way. So, what I did was took my phone and dropped it. Yes, that is right, I dropped my phone. And do you know why? It's because my case rocks. Anyway, I took my phone and dropped it from a height of 5 feet and dropped it. I let it fall and it hit the ground fine. Then I dropped it from the same height and applied AS MUCH FORCE AS I COULD I WENT HARD ON IT LET ME TELL YOU. The phone fell and slammed into the ground and all that happened was that a part of the case became a little loose. This shows the effect of applied force on something, in this case, it was an expensive iPhone with a sick case.
  3. Introduction: We decided to see if cars travelling North down Cooper Road outside of Irondequoit High School were speeding. We set up a timing station at twenty meters from the start to measure the speed of passing cars. Procedure: We chose a starting point on a line on the road, so timers could better see when cars started the measurable distance. When a car passed the starting point, timers at the station began their stopwatch. When the car passed the timer, they stopped their watch. Timers recorded the time it took for the car to travel the distance. Calculation: Conclusion: The average speed was 15.7 m/s, just .1m/s over the speed limit. Our conclusion is that cars travelling on Cooper Road do not often speed, perhaps due to the school zone. If we do this experiment again, there are a few things we can improve on. For one, we had some large distances in time span; this can be remedied by perhaps standardizing the timing system – should the timer start/stop when the front of the car passes through each point, the middle of the car, or the end?
  4. Wow, very useful advice!!!
  5. *name's, that requires an apostrophe because you're saying that your name is in fact Delaney. Anyways, I probably won't get credit for saying that so I'm gonna say that I agree with your reasons for taking Physics, I am in the same boat.
  6. Wow, you work at a restaurant! How very gosh darn cool!
  7. Hello fellow students, my name is Bobby and I like reading and sports even though I'm too lazy to do either. So I guess I like the concept of reading and watching sports. I'm a senior, like many of you! I'm taking Physics because it's the study of everything and I'm interested in everything. I hope to learn about everything this year. Thanks for reading and I'll see you in class.

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