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WanidaK

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About WanidaK

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    Everyone plzz add my bff nataliebecoats3 !! :)
  1. Woo homerun for the patriots!!
  2. In this video my group and I were test trying out our catapult at an approximate angle of 45 degrees which we hoped would of increased our distance. Projectile displacement is also present in this video, but also the force of gravity which then brings down the softball.
  3. WanidaK

    Pizza

    Yummy! I'm craving pizza now
  4. I can totally connect because my group had the same struggles while building our catapult
  5. Wow what an awesome connection!
  6. WanidaK

    Cooking Gone Wrong

    Looks like you had a lot of trouble cooking, but better luck next time!
  7. Wow looks like you know a lot about football Nat!!
  8. I am usually really careful when it comes to my phone, but accidents do happen and I dropped my phone on the cement ground. Since my phone dropped at free fall which means my phone was falling through the sole influence of gravity, it was accelerating vertically at 9.81 m/s^2 but with a initial velocity of zero. This is to say that my phone at free falling is changing by 9.81 m/s every second, but luckily enough my phone did not hit the ground hard enough to crack my screen. Also since my phone was falling at free fall that means there was no air resistance, and the easiest way to show other people the direction of how my phone dropping is to draw a dot diagram and the acceleration would be going down the the positive y-axis.
  9. For physics we were given an assignment to build a catapult. In order to build a successful catapult we needed to take into account the angle of the arm of the catapult that was approximately measured at 45°. At 45°, where the arm of the catapult was suppose to be angled, when launched was suppose to give us the tallest possible height. Considering we were off on our measurements we were only able to get the softball at a constant distance of 8m. Lifting the catapult itself required force because the force of gravity was pulling down the catapult which then made it difficult to life because the force of the catapult was pushing back. There was a force being applied when there were about 50 screws in the wood that my group and I had to take out because someone had to screw in the screws by pushing on the electrical screwdriver. When taking out the screws means we were the force that were pulling the screws out. Also there was tension on the catapult because when the bungee cords were added on to the catapult there was an exerted pulling force.
  10. BREAKING NEWS FROM IRONDEQUOIT HIGH SCHOOL This week, young physicists have been calculating acceleration due to gravity for their kinematics and gravity lab project. First, they were given the task to collect all of their materials, including: -Gator skin ball -Meter sticks - A Stop Watch They would measure the distance of how high the ball was off the ground, using the meter stick from the ground to the bottom of the ball that is touching the ceiling, a student holding it while standing on a desk. The person standing on the desk will then drop the ball, recording the time between when the ball was dropped until it touched the ground. They repeated the process three times, then took the average of the data times collected. The young physicists knew at first that initial velocity would have been 0 m/s, their measured distance being 240.5 cm at first, and then converted into 2.4m. The average time was .61 seconds for the young physicists, this information being enough in order to use an equation to find the acceleration due to gravity. What the young physicists did was use the equation: Vf=Vi+at^2 Afterwards, in order to find acceleration, the equation would have to be re-arranged in order to get an equation of A=2d/t^2 The young physicists would later on substitute their information into the variables, A=292.4m)/(.61s)^2 in order to get 12.9m/s^2. In the end they found their percentage error by subtracting the calculated from the accepted value and dividing by the accepted value. After that, it would be multiplied by 100. (9.81m/s^2)-(12.8m/s^2)/(9.81m/s^2) X 100 = 31.5% error
  11. I love baking just like you!
  12. WanidaK

    Kalea's Intro

    I love your reasoning behind taking physics because I agree 100%
  13. Hello, I'm Wanida and I'm 16 years old. I don't have much to say about myself because I don't do any extra curricular activities just because none seem to float my boat. In all honestly I feel as if don't do anything fairly productive with my day just because I am that type of person who just likes to lay on the couch and do absolutely nothing but watch netflix. But when I do decide to get up and do something I really like to go on hikes through nature because I really do enjoy that woodsy forest type of feel. The main reason I am taking physics is because all I heard last year from my friend Thea is that "quantum physics is amazing!" and from my sister, Christina "Mr. Fullerton is a genius". Also it seemed more fun that environmental science even though everyone has said it's a very difficult and challenging course.What i do hope to learn this year in physics is just the point blank question "what is it?" and how does it relate to our everyday lives and our well being. I hope that throughout this course I learn not only about physics but about myself and how I must accept my failures and learn from them.

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