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leiser24

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About leiser24

  • Rank
    Junior Member
  • Birthday 11/22/1996

core_pfieldgroups_99

  • Location
    Irondequoit, New York
  1. Everyone knows that one of their favorite past times is sitting in front of the television and watching movies, shows, or playing video games. However with this almost motionless, lazy activity comes a great deal of static physics and mechanics. When you are sitting down enjoying whatever show it is you may be watching, you actually have several forces acting on you concurrently. For example, by sitting on the couch with no extra weight on you, your weight is equivalent to the normal force, or the force of the couch on you. In addition to the force of the couch of you, if you are leaning
  2. Everyone knows that one of their favorite past times is sitting in front of the television and watching movies, shows, or playing video games. However with this almost motionless, lazy activity comes a great deal of static physics and mechanics. When you are sitting down enjoying whatever show it is you may be watching, you actually have several forces acting on you concurrently. For example, by sitting on the couch with no extra weight on you, your weight is equivalent to the normal force, or the force of the couch on you. In addition to the force of the couch of you, if you are leaning
  3. For those who follow or play lacrosse, hockey, and even soccer know of bar down goals. A bar down goal is one of the coolest goals a person in one of these sports can score, it's where the ball hits the crossbar on the shot and goes straight down or back into the net. It can get a team hyped up in a matter of seconds, but how does it happen? To start, why doesn't the goal come flying up with a powerful enough shot? Well, knowing the laws of momentum and motion, a lacrosse ball, or hockey puck, hitting the crossbar of an iron goal at 80 miles per hour won't move the goal much, as much mo
  4. Awesome! Wile E is the best!
  5. The other day I came across an idea that seemed unreal, a tourist attraction only for the elite members of society, an elevator into space. The concept is actually quite simple, and would make tourism into space much cheaper and easier. The idea uses a counterweight, or station, in space with a suspended cable anchored to a mobile point on earth's surface. Gravity would be pulling the cart down, as the coriolis effect, or force, pushes the cart horizontally, tilting the cable, as shown in the diagram below: Some of the math explaining the gravitational forces is more comple
  6. Something that is on most people's list of things to do before they die is skydiving. The thrill and passion of overcoming a common fear of heights drives thousands every year to jump out of an airplane five thousand feet in the air. But do you know how much force you exert free falling towards the earth? Let's say you jumped out of a plane five thousand feet in the air, neglecting air resistance, what would be your force in newtons? Well, according to the equation F=ma, and knowing that a= 9.81 m/s^2, and your mass in kilograms is 60, your force would be close to 600 N! After you jump f
  7. Neon lights are very common on signs for business that stay open late, and everyone has seen the recognizable "open" or "closed" sign during their late night runs to Taco Bell. These lights are very simple in how they work, and use less energy than traditional light bulbs. Most neon light tubes are filled with gases such as argon and neon, which are lighted when the atoms of the gas emit photons. This happens when electricity is sent through the tube, exciting the electrons in the gas, making them jump up to a higher energy level, and when they drop back down they release photons in the f
  8. leiser24

    Lacrosse

    Cool post, glad to know the physics of lacrosse now
  9. Have you ever been doing chores or showering and wondered how the water comes out of the shower head or faucet? Well, if you have, this blog entry will explain the basics of how they work. A faucet is a device that regulates the flow of water in a system, such as a house or school, and without them, water would be flowing constantly out of pipes be almost useless in everyday life. SImple machines work to control the pressure and flow of water, including levers and screws. The pressure inside of water pipes is much higher than the pressure of the air outside of the tube, which allows the
  10. A lacrosse ball is a solid sphere composed of a hard synthetic rubber material, which allows it to be heavy enough to throw with maximum speed and momentum, yet flexible enough to bounce. There are many aspects of the ball that are related to physics. For instance, the "grippiness" of the ball gives it the ability to spin when thrown out of a player's stick, creating centripital force, and if the ball gets spinning fast enough, let's say on a really hard shot or long pass, the ball can actually vere off normal trajectory lines and "curve". This phenomenon is very similar to a pitcher on
  11. Nowadays basically every teenage male and female carries a device capable of playing music portably, through small speakers or large, over ear headphones. Many companies now offer "noise-cancelling" devices, that divert any sounds from outside the headphones while they are playing, rather than the smaller, in-ear speakers that produce smaller amounts of bass and volume. Have you ever wondered how your earpod works? In-ear headphones are small speakers that direct most of the sound waves into the ear canal, while the over-ear headphones create more movement and vibration, which translates i
  12. Cool video and very interesting post!
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