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ThePeculiarParticle

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Everything posted by ThePeculiarParticle

  1. Anyone who is friends with me knows I love fishing of any kind. The one which I feel is the most labor intensive per cast is most certainly fly fishing, and know any of the friends I’ve taught even the most basic casts will agree. For those who aren't familiar with fly fishing, it separates itself from any other kind with the type of rod, reel, and cats the user makes. Regular fishing uses a reel where the user casts out in one fluid motion where they wish to go. In fly fishing, the flies, or baits, are so small that the caster needs to swing the line through the air in order to get it anywher
  2. Ever add too much food coloring or dye to water and wish there was a way to separate it out? “Yea it happens all the time TPP what about it?” I hear you say. Well I just wanted to show a phenomenon where the mixing of different fluids can be reversed, but it only occurs under certain circumstances. Laminar flows only occur in situations depending on the viscosity or velocity of a fluid. When fluids mix slower, there is less chance of a turbulent flow where the creation of eddies. Eddies are what cause substances to mix in other planes than just lateral. This action is immensely h
  3. So, as a recap for mid year, I wanted to talk about two types of physics related media . These two sources have inspired ideas for blog posts, and are things I listen or watch for enjoyment. So without further adieu, here they are: 1. Twenty Thousand Hertz - What is it? Well, it is a podcast about sound. Wait don’t leave just yet... It is a lot better than it sounds, I swear. This labor of love connects the sounds we hear everyday to physics, psychology, ecology, and even history. The topics range, with subjects that could interest most listeners, and I cannot recommend this serie
  4. Inspired by AaronSwims’s blog post title, I wanted to make my own post on a completely different topic. I wanted to focus on resonance and, while we briefly touched upon it last year, I feel the need to write about it. Resonance, in its most basic definition, is “the condition in which an object or system is subjected to an oscillating force having a frequency close to its own natural frequency”. So how do we see this every day? Bang a pot, pan, glass, even sheet metal and you will find that a noise of a certain pitch emanates from it. If there is little dampening (energy lost in other forms),
  5. “Alright stop, collaborate and listen Ice is back with my brand new invention Something grabs a hold of me tightly Flow like a harpoon daily and nightly Will it ever stop yo I don't know Turn off the lights and I'll glow.” Why would I start this blog up with Vanilla Ice’s song “Ice Ice Baby”? Well Ice is the subject of today’s blog. “BUT TPP, HOW MUCH CAN YOU TALK ABOUT ICE?” I hear you ask off in the distance from behind your computer… well, honestly, a lot. I love ice, from chilling hot summer drinks, to fishing through it in the winter. In the N
  6. STAR WARS SPOILERS AHEAD!!!!! It's never a good idea to go to a science fiction film and look for scientific inaccuracies. That being said, a lot of things from episode VIII a lot of things left a bitter taste in my mouth, but I'm here to talk about one scientific inaccuracy which leaves a Death Star sized hole in the story’s plot for all movies. The one scene I am referring to occurs near the middle of the film when a large resistance ship, called the Raddus, aims itself at Snoke’s ship, called the Supremacy, and rams into it at light speed. This results in the ship be
  7. Second quarter was a much different quarter than last quarter, specifically the last half. Mechanics ended, giving way to the electricity and magnetism units, and in turn giving me a solid kick in the rear. All other classes are managing to heat up as well, in fact, they have been for a while. I tried doing something different by writing my blogs in a word document, separately from just posting them, to see if I want to add anything. This only resulted I'm me scrapping a few ideas which were mostly written because I had not liked them enough. It also didn't help with staying ahead because no b
  8. On October 15th 1991, an event which challenged our scientific understanding of our universe occurred. The particle that was registered is now referred to as the “Oh My God Particle” after the statement blurted out upon detecting it. Under the night sky of Utah’s Cosmic Ray Detector, a particle was recorded going 99.99999999999999999999951% the speed of light. To put that in perspective, that is faster than even the highest recorded speed of a proton recorded in the Large Hadron Collider, which was 99.999999% the speed of light. It takes increasingly more energy to speed up a
  9. The objective of the lab TheNightKing and I performed this week was to create a functioning top with the given materials of a pencil, 2 paper plates, 6 pennies, and tape. In relation to the engineering design process this would be the problem or objective we need to focus our ideas around. Our next step would be research, but , due to our lack of time, we pulled from our knowledge gained throughout this past unit and our previous year physics. One of the main principles to keep a top up is angular momentum. The equation for spinning angular momentum is rotational inertia x angular velocit
  10. When I look back to past Thanksgivings, I remember the smell of turkey baking, my sister leaving after the Thanksgiving Day Parade, and clicking over to the Science Channel to watch one of the most prestigious competitions of the year: Pumpkin Chunkin. The goal of the competition is to use a variety of heavy machines to blast pumpkins as far as possible. The different divisions consisted of air cannons, trebuchets, torsion, and “centrifugal” machines. While the trebuchets and torsion divisions are the flashiest, and the air cannons blast pumpkins the farthest, the “centrifugal” machines are
  11. Congratulations!!! That was an awesome game to watch! I feel like, in volleyball, having smaller teams on such large courts makes it one of the hardest sports to change momentum in, especially if the team members start getting in their heads. From what I saw last night though, it was obvious you guys had no problem shaking things off and moving onto the next play. That definitely puts your team above many others regardless of skill. I wish you guy the best of luck moving forward!
  12. Whenever I see saw waves I cant help but think of the synth pioneers and how much the synth has affected music since the early 70's. It's a truly unnatural sound. If you ever wish to check out another example of the "futuristic/robotic" sound you were describing in action, check out the original Blade Runner OST.
  13. This was a very interesting blog post. I just wanted to add that there was one commercial airline that went above the speed of sound that I can think of off the top of my head. It was retired in 2003 and was known as the Concorde. It flew at Mach 2.04 (1354 MPH) and could hold up to 128 passengers!!!! It was known for crossing the Atlantic Ocean from NYC to London in 3.5 hours. It was definitely a more expensive option than most flights, but could hold large numbers of people. The engineering behind it is fascinating from its drooping nose, to the structural expansion and compression it needed
  14. Question: Was the smurf put in the box before or after the bottles? In all seriousness, this is a awesome post with an interesting idea behind it! Good job keeping it holiday themed as well.
  15. There is a very interesting phenomena I saw in a video recently where olive oil is used to calm a lake's surface. It works on the principle that the oil thinly coats the lake's surface and the wind does not have the same amount of "grip" on the surface as it would water due to a lack of friction. The result is a calm lake under windy skies. Video:
  16. Our group took far too long on this lab as well, and had the exact same problems. We also made a mistake our first time collecting data, but it worked itself out. We learned the exact same lesson, so don't worry, you are not alone.
  17. Thank you FizziksGuy! It sounds like you have a lot of passion for the field. I look forward to talking with you and hearing about your past experiences.
  18. This is a very interesting blog post, but can you please explain why the moon rocks are so important for this process? I'm asking for a friend who currently works for Black Mesa.
  19. So, knowing that Onix has a mass of 210 kg, and the volume of a Poké Ball is .000134 m^3, and say this monster could magically be compacted into that space without any damage, then the density inside that filled Poké Ball is 1,567,164.179 kg/m^3. Besides needing to carry a 210 kg ball around everywhere there is another problem. To put that in perspective our sun's inner core is calculated to be 150,000 kg/m^3. YIKES... there must be another way they need to be stored without carrying around a pocket nuclear fusion reactor.
  20. I was a fan of Pokémon for a very brief time as a kid, but it stopped the same summer it started. So, when a recent post went around about an Onix’s size compared to a Pokéball, courtesy of etracey99, I was a little interested in the subject. I began wondering, what exactly is this rock monster made out of? The answer shocked me. In order to do this, we need the density of the Pokémon. The first step is to find the volume of this behemoth. To do this, I gathered information such as that it is 28’ 1’’ in length. Now this is nice, but since it is made up of a series of boulders, I
  21. Thanks etracey99! Yea, that may be a good idea for the future... In the meantime, I will cover some other subjects because the last thing I want to be known on here as is the Pokémon density guy.
  22. To sum up this quarter, it has had ups and downs, but gladly a majority of it was ups. The biggest lesson I learned is that, while this is an applied calculus class, it is more of a learned calculus class because so much calculus is used in physics before it is learned in the classroom. The best thing to compare it to is a special kind of road trip. You know where you are starting and the final destination and, most importantly, why you need to get there, but the second you look down at your road map, you remember you can’t read, understand symbols, and heck, the road map hasn’t even been full
  23. That standard blue glow associated with radiation has much more behind it than meets the eye. This phenomenon is called Cherenkov radiation. The blue glow is a result of particles moving faster than the speed of light. “WAIT THEY CAN’T DO THAT! STOP LYING! OH THE HUMANITY!” I hear off in the distance. Yes, in certain circumstances it is possible. We learned last year about the refractive index which is a ratio of velocity of light in a vacuum ( c ) which is 3x10^8m/s over how fast it can travel in a medium. The equation is shown below: The larger the n value, the s
  24. So, we always talk about the coefficient of friction in dynamics, but we don’t talk about what causes it. The truth is there are multiple factors. The one most people think of is based upon how rough a surface is. Coarse grit sandpaper requires more force, and takes more material off an object, than fine grit. The same idea applies to smooth objects on a much smaller scale. Even something as smooth as the surface of a polished table, on a much smaller scale, has ridges and valleys. These imperfections are known as asperities (such an odd vocabulary word) and look similar to this. T
  25. What is this? Over the summer I participated in Photon Camp at the University of Rochester with a few classmates. It was an awesome experience by the way! The main reason I’m here is to talk about the project I worked on in a group of 4. Each student had a different project. So, if you need an idea for a blog post, there you go. My group was studying photolithography which is the process of creating patterns using light. We worked with Professor Bryan McIntire and were able to go into the clean room and actually perform the process on a series of silicon wafers coated in the photore
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