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Found 69 results

  1. Projectile motion is composed of a horizontal and a vertical component. This video shows that via a side-by-side video demonstration and also builds the velocity and acceleration vector diagram. Content Times: 0:14 Reviewing Projectile Motion 1:00 Introducing each of the video components 1:40 Building the x-direction velocity vectors 2:15 Building the y-direction velocity vectors 3:12 Combing velocity vectors to get resultant velocity vectors 3:41 Showing how we created the resultant velocity vectors 4:47 Adding acceleration vectors in the y-direction 5:28 Adding acceleration vectors in the x-direction 5:45 Completing the Velocity and Acceleration diagram 5:58 The diagram floating over clouds, i mean, why not, eh? Want [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/components-of-projectile-motion.html"]Lecture Notes[/url]? Multilingual? Please help [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/translate.html"]translate Flipping Physics videos[/url]! Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/skateboarding.html"]Skateboarding Frame of Reference Demonstration[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/bullet.html"]The Classic Bullet Projectile Motion Experiment[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url]
  2. Two vehicles driven at different speeds parallel to one another is a great one dimensional way to introduce relative motion. When viewed from above using a quadcopter drone, it is even better! Thanks Aaron Fown of [url="http://www.firstuav.co"]FirstUAV[/url] for providing the wonderful, non-terrestrial viewpoint. Content Times: 0:35 Visualizing the example 1:31 Understanding the subscripts 2:46 Visualizing the Velocity of the minivan with respect to the Prius 3:33 Solving for the Velocity of the minivan with respect to the Prius 5:05 Negative vectors in relative motion 6:11 Understanding when a subscript drops out of the equation 7:05 Solving for the Velocity of the Prius with respect to the minivan 8:17 Review / visualizing multiple velocities Want [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/introduction-to-relative-motion.html"]Lecture Notes[/url]? Multilingual? Please help [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/translate.html"]translate Flipping Physics videos[/url]! [size=4]Next Video: [color=rgb(0,0,0)][font=Helvetica]An Introductory [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/relative-motion-problem.html"]Relative Motion Problem[/url][/font][/color][/size] Previous video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/skateboarding.html"]Skateboarding Frame of Reference Demonstration[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url]
  3. All motion is relative to a frame of reference. A simple demonstration showing this to be true. Content Times: 0:21 The demonstration 1:22 A second, similar demonstration Multilingual? [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/translate.html"]Please help translate Flipping Physics videos![/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/introduction-to-relative-motion.html"]Introduction to Relative Motion[/url] using a Quadcopter Drone Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/components-of-projectile-motion.html"]Demonstrating the Components of Projectile Motion[/url] Thank you very much to [url="http://www.chrisdupontmusic.com"]Chris Dupont[/url] for letting me use my recording of “Starting Fires” from his show at The Ark on 2013/11/14. [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url]
  4. Name: Skateboarding Frame of Reference Demonstration Category: Kinematics Date Added: 15 October 2014 - 02:52 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided All motion is relative to a frame of reference. A simple demonstration showing this to be true. Content Times: 0:21 The demonstration 1:22 A second, similar demonstration Multilingual? View Video
  5. This relative motion problem addresses how to deal with vectors that do not form right triangles. Content Times: 0:15 Reading the problem 0:32 Translating the problem 1:29 Visualizing the problem 2:30 Drawing the vector diagram 2:57 Haven’t we already done this problem? 3:31 How NOT to solve the problem 4:06 How to solve the problem using component vectors 4:40 Finding component vectors 5:58 Redrawing the vector diagram 6:20 Finding the magnitude of the resultant vector 8:02 Finding the direction of the resultant vector 9:15 Showing the resultant vector angle Want [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/relative-motion-components.html"]Lecture Notes[/url]? Multilingual? [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/translate.html"]Please help translate Flipping Physics videos![/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/relative-motion-angle.html"]Relative Motion Problem: Solving for the angle of the moving object[/url] Previous video: An Introductory [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/relative-motion-problem.html"]Relative Motion Problem[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url] "[url="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Protractor_Rapporteur_Degrees_V3.jpg#mediaviewer/File:Protractor_Rapporteur_Degrees_V3.jpg"]Protractor Rapporteur Degrees V3[/url]" by Scientif38 - Own work. Licensed under Creative Commons Zero, Public Domain Dedication via Wikimedia Commons "[url="http://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Nombre_de_los_vientos.svg#mediaviewer/File:Nombre_de_los_vientos.svg"]Nombre de los vientos[/url]". Licensed under Public domain via Wikimedia Commons
  6. Name: An Introductory Relative Motion Problem with Vector Components Category: Kinematics Date Added: 02 October 2014 - 09:52 AM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided This relative motion problem addresses how to deal with vectors that do not form right triangles. Content Times: 0:15 Reading the problem 0:32 Translating the problem 1:29 Visualizing the problem 2:30 Drawing the vector diagram 2:57 Haven’t we already done this problem? 3:31 How NOT to solve the problem 4:06 How to solve the problem using component vectors 4:40 Finding component vectors 5:58 Redrawing the vector diagram 6:20 Finding the magnitude of the resultant vector 8:02 Finding the direction of the resultant vector 9:15 Showing the resultant vector angle Want View Video
  7. Name: Introduction to Relative Motion using a Quadcopter Drone (UAV) Category: Kinematics Date Added: 23 September 2014 - 03:21 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided Two vehicles driven at different speeds parallel to one another is a great one dimensional way to introduce relative motion. When viewed from above using a quadcopter drone, it is even better! Thanks Aaron Fown of View Video
  8. Name: Demonstrating the Components of Projectile Motion Category: Kinematics Date Added: 12 August 2014 - 10:30 AM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided Projectile motion is composed of a horizontal and a vertical component. This video shows that via a side-by-side video demonstration and also builds the velocity and acceleration vector diagram. Content Times: 0:14 Reviewing Projectile Motion 1:00 Introducing each of the video components 1:40 Building the x-direction velocity vectors 2:15 Building the y-direction velocity vectors 3:12 Combing velocity vectors to get resultant velocity vectors 3:41 Showing how we created the resultant velocity vectors 4:47 Adding acceleration vectors in the y-direction 5:28 Adding acceleration vectors in the x-direction 5:45 Completing the Velocity and Acceleration diagram 5:58 The diagram floating over clouds, i mean, why not, eh? Want View Video
  9. We need to know the initial velocity of a projectile leaving the Nerd-A-Pult. That means we need the initial speed and the initial angle. This video shows exactly how I measured both. Content Times: 0:30 Taking measurements to determine the launch angle 1:20 Finding a triangle 2:02 Defining the angles 3:35 Determining the launch angle 4:38 Using the frame rate to find the change in time 5:08 Measuring the distance travelled during the first frame 6:12 Why initial speed and not initial velocity? 6:39 Determining the average launch speed [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/measuring-vi.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/another-projectile-motion.html"]Nerd-A-Pult #2[/url] - Another Projectile Motion Problem Previous Problem: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/nerd-a-pult.html"]Nerd-A-Pult - An Introductory Projectile Motion Problem[/url] Want a Nerd-A-Pult? You can purchase one at [url="http://marshmallowcatapults.com"]marshmallowcatapults.com[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url]
  10. Name: Nerd-A-Pult - Measuring Initial Velocity Category: Kinematics Date Added: 27 May 2014 - 09:29 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided We need to know the initial velocity of a projectile leaving the Nerd-A-Pult. That means we need the initial speed and the initial angle. This video shows exactly how I measured both. Content Times: 0:30 Taking measurements to determine the launch angle 1:20 Finding a triangle 2:02 Defining the angles 3:35 Determining the launch angle 4:38 Using the frame rate to find the change in time 5:08 Measuring the distance travelled during the first frame 6:12 Why initial speed and not initial velocity? 6:39 Determining the average launch speed View Video
  11. Now that we have dropped the ball into the bucket, we can determine the final velocity of the ball right before it strikes the bucket. Don't forget that velocity is a vector and has both magnitude and direction. Yep, component vector review! Content Times: 0:34 Finding the final velocity in the y direction. 1:52 We need to find the hypotenuse! 2:28 Finding the final velocity in the x direction. 2:57 Finding the magnitude of the final velocity. 4:06 Finding the direction of the final velocity. 5:08 The number answer. 5:52 Visualizing the answer. 6:28 Why is the ball always right below mr.p's hand? 7:07 Doesn't the ball travel farther than mr.p's hand? 7:33 The Review. [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/projectile-motion-problem-part-2-of-2.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/how-many.html"]How Many Attempts did it Really Take?[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/the-euler-method.html"]A Brief Look at the Force of Drag using Numerical Modeling (or The Euler Method)[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/projectile-motion-problem-part-1-of-2.html"](part 1 of 2) An Introductory Projectile Motion Problem with an Initial Horizontal Velocity[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url]
  12. Name: (Part 2 of 2) An Introductory Projectile Motion Problem with an Initial Horizontal Velocity Category: Kinematics Date Added: 22 May 2014 - 04:57 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided Now that we have dropped the ball into the bucket, we can determine the final velocity of the ball right before it strikes the bucket. Don't forget that velocity is a vector and has both magnitude and direction. Yep, component vector review! Content Times: 0:34 Finding the final velocity in the y direction. 1:52 We need to find the hypotenuse! 2:28 Finding the final velocity in the x direction. 2:57 Finding the magnitude of the final velocity. 4:06 Finding the direction of the final velocity. 5:08 The number answer. 5:52 Visualizing the answer. 6:28 Why is the ball always right below mr.p's hand? 7:07 Doesn't the ball travel farther than mr.p's hand? 7:33 The Review. View Video
  13. Can you drop a ball from a moving vehicle and get it to land in a bucket? You can using Physics! In this video we solve an introductory projectile motion problem involving an initial horizontal velocity and predict how far in front of the bucket to drop the ball. Content Times: 0:17 Reading the problem. 0:41 Visualizing the problem. 1:18 Translating the problem. 2:31 Converting from miles per hour to meters per second. 3:10 Two common mistakes about projectile motion givens. 4:29 Beginning to solve the problem. 5:13 Solving for the change in time in the y-direction. 6:22 Solving for the displacement in the x-direction. 7:29 Video proof that it works. 8:14 Air resistance? 9:09 In our next lesson... [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/projectile-motion-problem-part-1-of-2.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/projectile-motion-problem-part-2-of-2.html"](part 2 of 2) An Introductory Projectile Motion Problem with an Initial Horizontal Velocity[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/how-many.html"]How Many Attempts did it Really Take?[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/the-euler-method.html"]A Brief Look at the Force of Drag using Numerical Modeling (or The Euler Method)[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/projectile-motion.html"]Introduction to Projectile Motion[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/give.html"]1¢/minute[/url]
  14. Name: (Part 1 of 2) An Introductory Projectile Motion Problem with an Initial Horizontal Velocity Category: Kinematics Date Added: 22 May 2014 - 04:49 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided Can you drop a ball from a moving vehicle and get it to land in a bucket? You can using Physics! In this video we solve an introductory projectile motion problem involving an initial horizontal velocity and predict how far in front of the bucket to drop the ball. Content Times: 0:17 Reading the problem. 0:41 Visualizing the problem. 1:18 Translating the problem. 2:31 Converting from miles per hour to meters per second. 3:10 Two common mistakes about projectile motion givens. 4:29 Beginning to solve the problem. 5:13 Solving for the change in time in the y-direction. 6:22 Solving for the displacement in the x-direction. 7:29 Video proof that it works. 8:14 Air resistance? 9:09 In our next lesson... View Video
  15. Previously we determined the motion graphs for dropping a ball from 2.0 meters and throwing a ball up to 2.0 meters and catching it again. In this video I show that the reverse of the drop coupled with the drop itself is the same thing as throwing the ball upward. Make sense? Okay, watch the video. Content Times: 0:13 Reviewing the previous graphs 0:25 The drop is the same as the 2nd half of the drop 0:48 Dropping the medicine ball in reverse 1:16 Bobby reviews 1:35 Links to Previous and Next Videos [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/drop-and-upward-throw.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/stop-motion-photography.html"]Creating a Position vs. Time Graph using Stop Motion Photography[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/throwing-a-ball.html"]Throwing a Ball up to 2.0 Meters & Proving the Velocity at the Top is Zero[/url]
  16. Name: The Drop and Upward Throw of a Ball are Very Similar Category: Kinematics Date Added: 22 May 2014 - 04:25 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided Previously we determined the motion graphs for dropping a ball from 2.0 meters and throwing a ball up to 2.0 meters and catching it again. In this video I show that the reverse of the drop coupled with the drop itself is the same thing as throwing the ball upward. Make sense? Okay, watch the video. Content Times: 0:13 Reviewing the previous graphs 0:25 The drop is the same as the 2nd half of the drop 0:48 Dropping the medicine ball in reverse 1:16 Bobby reviews 1:35 Links to Previous and Next Videos View Video
  17. In the previous lesson we dropped a ball from 2.0 meters above the ground and now we throw one up to a height of 2.0 meters. We do this in order to understand the similarities between the two events. Oh, and of course we draw some graphs. This is an Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem Content Times: 0:18 Reviewing the previous lesson 0:34 Reading the new problem 1:26 Acceleration vs. time 1:59 Velocity vs. time 2:49 Position vs. time 4:16 The Velocity at the top is ZERO! 5:50 Comparing throwing the ball to dropping the ball 6:56 Finding the total change in time 7:44 Finding the velocity initial 9:47 The Review [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/throwing-a-ball.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/drop-and-upward-throw.html"]The Drop and Upward Throw of a Ball are Very Similar[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/graphing-the-drop-of-a-ball.html"]Graphing the Drop of a Ball from 2.0 Meters[/url] - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem
  18. Name: Throwing a Ball up to 2.0 Meters & Proving the Velocity at the Top is Zero Category: Kinematics Date Added: 22 May 2014 - 04:23 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided In the previous lesson we dropped a ball from 2.0 meters above the ground and now we throw one up to a height of 2.0 meters. We do this in order to understand the similarities between the two events. Oh, and of course we draw some graphs. This is an Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem Content Times: 0:18 Reviewing the previous lesson 0:34 Reading the new problem 1:26 Acceleration vs. time 1:59 Velocity vs. time 2:49 Position vs. time 4:16 The Velocity at the top is ZERO! 5:50 Comparing throwing the ball to dropping the ball 6:56 Finding the total change in time 7:44 Finding the velocity initial 9:47 The Review View Video
  19. This video continues a problem we already solved involving dropping a ball from 2.0 meters. Now we determine how to draw the position, velocity and acceleration as functions of time graphs. Content Times: 0:17 Reviewing the previous lesson 1:00 Acceleration as a function of time 1:31 Velocity as a function of time 2:39 Position as a function of time 3:56 The Review [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/graphing-the-drop-of-a-ball.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/throwing-a-ball.html"]Throwing a Ball up to 2.0 Meters & Proving the Velocity at the Top is Zero[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/dropping-a-ball-from-20-meters.html"]Dropping a Ball from 2.0 Meters[/url] - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem
  20. Name: Graphing the Drop of a Ball from 2.0 Meters - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem Category: Kinematics Date Added: 22 May 2014 - 04:22 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided This video continues a problem we already solved involving dropping a ball from 2.0 meters. Now we determine how to draw the position, velocity and acceleration as functions of time graphs. Content Times: 0:17 Reviewing the previous lesson 1:00 Acceleration as a function of time 1:31 Velocity as a function of time 2:39 Position as a function of time 3:56 The Review View Video
  21. In this introductory free-fall acceleration problem we analyze a video of a medicine ball being dropped to determine the final velocity and the time in free-fall. Included are three common mistakes students make. "Why include mistakes?" you might ask. Well, it is important to understand what happens when you make mistakes so that you can recognize them in the future. There is also brief description of "parallax" and how it affects what you see in the video compared to reality. Content TImes: 0:26 Reading and viewing the problem 0:50 Describing the parallax issue 1:52 Translating the problem to physics 2:05 1st common mistake: Velocity final is not zero 3:09 Finding the 3rd UAM variable, initial velocity 3:56 Don't we need to know the mass of the medicine ball? 4:35 Solving for the final velocity in the y direction: part (a) 5:39 Identifying our 2nd common mistake: Square root of a negative number? 7:56 Solving for the change in time: part (b) 8:28 Identifying our 3rd common mistake: Negative time? 9:36 Please don't write negative down! 10:27 Does reality match the physics? 11:07 The Review [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/dropping-a-ball-from-20-meters.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/graphing-the-drop-of-a-ball.html"]Graphing the Drop of a Ball from 2.0 Meters[/url] - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/apollo-15-feather-and-hammer-drop.html"]Analyzing the Apollo 15 Feather and Hammer Drop[/url] -- A Basic Introductory Free-Fall Problem
  22. Name: Dropping a Ball from 2.0 Meters - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem Category: Kinematics Date Added: 22 May 2014 - 04:20 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided In this introductory free-fall acceleration problem we analyze a video of a medicine ball being dropped to determine the final velocity and the time in free-fall. Included are three common mistakes students make. "Why include mistakes?" you might ask. Well, it is important to understand what happens when you make mistakes so that you can recognize them in the future. There is also brief description of "parallax" and how it affects what you see in the video compared to reality. Content TImes: 0:26 Reading and viewing the problem 0:50 Describing the parallax issue 1:52 Translating the problem to physics 2:05 1st common mistake: Velocity final is not zero 3:09 Finding the 3rd UAM variable, initial velocity 3:56 Don't we need to know the mass of the medicine ball? 4:35 Solving for the final velocity in the y direction: part (a) 5:39 Identifying our 2nd common mistake: Square root of a negative number? 7:56 Solving for the change in time: part ( 8:28 Identifying our 3rd common mistake: Negative time? 9:36 Please don't write negative down! 10:27 Does reality match the physics? 11:07 The Review Want Lecture Notes? Next Video: Graphing the Drop of a Ball from 2.0 Meters - An Introductory Free-Fall Acceleration Problem Previous Video: Analyzing the Apollo 15 Feather and Hammer Drop -- A Basic Introductory Free-Fall Problem View Video
  23. Again with the graphs? Yes. Absolutely Yes. Graphs are such an important part of any science, especially physics. The more you work with graphs, the more you will understand them. Here we combine graphs and uniformly accelerated motion. Enjoy. Content Times: 0:29 Reading the Problem 1:02 How do we know it is UAM from the graph? 1:26 Two different, equivalent equations for acceleration 2:41 Finding acceleration 3:23 Graphing acceleration vs. time 3:44 The general shape of the position vs. time graph 4:53 Determining specific points on the position vs. time graph 6:06 Graphing position vs. time 6:58 The Review [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/graphical-uam-example.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] Previous Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/instantaneous-and-average-velocity.html"]Understanding Instantaneous and Average Velocity using a Graph[/url] Next Video: [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/reviewing-one-dimensional-motion.html"]Reviewing One Dimensional Motion with the Table of Friends[/url]
  24. Name: Graphical UAM Example Problem Category: Kinematics Date Added: 21 May 2014 - 03:48 PM Submitter: Flipping Physics Short Description: None Provided Again with the graphs? Yes. Absolutely Yes. Graphs are such an important part of any science, especially physics. The more you work with graphs, the more you will understand them. Here we combine graphs and uniformly accelerated motion. Enjoy. Content Times: 0:29 Reading the Problem 1:02 How do we know it is UAM from the graph? 1:26 Two different, equivalent equations for acceleration 2:41 Finding acceleration 3:23 Graphing acceleration vs. time 3:44 The general shape of the position vs. time graph 4:53 Determining specific points on the position vs. time graph 6:06 Graphing position vs. time 6:58 The Review View Video
  25. Students often get confused by the difference between Instantaneous and Average. In this video we use a graph to compare and understand the two different concepts. Content Times: 0:28 Defining Instantaneous and Average Velocity 0:52 Examples of Each 2:23 The Graph 2:42 Walking the Graph (my favorite part) 3:19 Average Velocity from 0 - 5 Seconds 5:30 Average Velocity from 5 - 10 Seconds 6:45 Some Instantaneous Velocities 7:44 Average Velocity from 0 - 17 Seconds 8:37 Drawing this Average Velocity on the Graph 9:15 Comparing Average Velocity to Instantaneous Velocity 10:32 What was the Instantaneous Velocity at exactly 5 seconds? 11:47 The Review [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/instantaneous-and-average-velocity.html"]Want Lecture Notes?[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/the-humility-soapbox-ndash-uniformly-vs-uniformally.html"]Previous Video: The Humility Soapbox -- Uniformly vs. Uniformally[/url] [url="http://www.flippingphysics.com/graphical-uam-example.html"]Next Video: Graphical UAM Example Problem[/url]

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