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Determining Maximum Height Lab Deliverable

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Guest crazyskittles

This lab had such high percent error because of the methods used to measure the jumps. Tape, meter sticks and stopwatches are relatively simple methods of measurement, and therefore not very easy to use accurately. Because each time there was a different person jumping, there was also a different person timing, which would cause discrepancies in the times by each jumper. It was difficult to get the tape onto the wall in a straight line while mid-jump, and then we had to measure the differences between the tape, when it was difficult to tell if we should use the lower end of the tape of the higher end. In order to lower the percent error in this experiment, I would suggest using a machine of some sort in order to more accurately find a measurement. This machine could be able to start the clock as soon as the person jumps, and stop it as soon as they land. It would also be a better way to measure the height of the jump.

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This Lab had an extremly high percent of error. This high percent error is caused because of the poor way to measure how high you jump, and the way you have to messure how long the person jumping is in the air. You can fix this by insted of measuring how high you jump with tape, you use the profesional vertical jump measurer that they use in the NFL combine. You can fix the way you time how long your in the air by taping yourself jump on a high speed camra. This shows that there are ways to make this lab alot more accurate.

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Katrina, Leah, and Holly. This method had such a high percent error for us because of the gap between actually time and when the stop watch was hit. Another factor that could cause the high percent error is when knees are bent, it makes the time longer because of the effort needed to bend down, then jump up. smaller times are more accuature because it is the actual time in the air, the distance found through equations were so much greator because our times were when leaving the ground, and not simply in the air. therefore there are many

factors that can contribute to such a high percent error. to eliminate this large gap we could not bend knees. and rec ord the time feet are actually in the air.

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Our balls velocity had a 30.5% percent error, which makes our resuslts very unreliable. There could have been many reasons why our percent error was so high, disregarding human error. With such a short distance of 2m, the stop watch could have been started or stopped to early or too late, this messes up our times. No one has super sharp reflexes so timing really negatively affected our experiment. The position of the ball as it was dropped was also an issue because there was no way of knowing that each time the ball was dropped it was in the same position as in the other trials. if we could re design this experiment we would use better technology like in Myth Busters with the hgh tech high speed cameras, we would also take better measurements of where the ball is placed so all of these things can be constant.

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On a bright tuesday afternoon, several students of West Irondequoit High School attempted to calculate a person's jumping hieght using two methods: putting tape on the wall where their hands met at the max hieght of the jump, and by recording the time it took for one to jump and fall back to the ground. The results of the two experiments were not too accurate compared to each other, however. The likely source of miscalculation would have to be the stopwatch, as there will always be some error because it cannot be 100% exact all the time. a possible fix to this situation would be a sensor on the ground that would tell when you leave the ground and when you reach back down on the ground once again.

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Determining Maximum Height Lab Deliverable: Maddy, Paul, and Remo.

The maximum vertical leap of an athlete using a stopwaych and kinematic equations has a very high error percentage. This is because it is hard for the person who is doing the timing to know when the jumper leaves and returns back to the ground to the exact second. In addition, there may be other factors that could affect the data including if the person is bending their knees before they jump and how much they may be bending them, if they take a running start, or if they they jumped with one foor starting on the ground versus two. If this could be re-designed using more accurate state- of- the-art measuring equiptment, a more modern experiment could be using something like lasers and computers with timers. We could set them up so they would know exactly when the persons feet left the floor and when they touched back down and it could time exactly how long they were in the air for. In addition, there could also be a set of directions stating the specific way each individual has to jump. (ie. without a running start, and with both feet starting on the ground.) This would for the most part give the students testing the experiment more accurate data.

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William Pagán Jr., Mark Paradise, Preston Monigle

This lab has many 'errors', most of which has to do with calculations. For example, you cant accuratly make out each and every calculation when it comes to determining the height a person can jump. Just a slight movement of the ruler or the hand can cause an error to the point of where the percent error can be easily seen. The timing in which you jump can also be messed up easily. Improving the lab can be fairly easy. For determining the distance in which the person can jump, you can have an accurate ruler already printed on the wall so that you could easily determine the height.

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