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mandy

Speeding Lab

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Mandy, Zach, Zach, Mitchell, Grace

 

Speeding Lab Write-Up                                                                 Mitchell Bertch Grace Bradshaw

              Mandy Napierala Zach Haight Zach Burget

 

The problem that we were trying to solve was how fast cars were driving down cooper road. In order to figure this out, we had to take measurements and calculate the speed. With these calculations the police department will be able to prevent people from speeding in front of the school.

Procedure:

  1. Measure the distance between the two telephone poles.
  2. Made two people stand at the first pole and have both time when a car passed by
  3. We had a person at the second pole alerting us when the car we were timing had passed our end point.
  4. We also had someone writing down the description of the car we timed in a table and also recording the time that the car took to pass the end point.
  5. After we did theses steps for one car, we repeated them for 9 more.

 

post-3464-0-20011200-1410548334_thumb.pn

 

 

 

Car

Time 1

Time 2

Speed 1

Speed 2

Distance

Avg Speed (m/s)

green chevy

3.4

3.7

12.35294118

11.35135135

42

11.85214626

blue volvo

3.08

3.16

13.63636364

13.29113924

42

13.46375144

white chevy

3.2

3.32

13.125

12.65060241

42

12.8878012

blue subaru

3.17

3.3

13.24921136

12.72727273

42

12.98824204

black chevy

3.6

3.5

11.66666667

12

42

11.83333333

school bus

3.47

3.8

12.1037464

11.05263158

42

11.57818899

gold ford

3.18

3.32

13.20754717

12.65060241

42

12.92907479

green range

3.2

3.4

13.125

12.35294118

42

12.73897059

white ford

3.1

3.3

13.5483871

12.72727273

42

13.13782991

black toyota

3.2

3.33

13.125

12.61261261

42

12.86880631

 

            In our studies, we found that none of the cars we timed were speeding and the majority of them were going under the speed limit. The speed limit was 15.6 m/s and on average the cars were traveling at 12.5 m/s. If we were to do this experiment again, we would have the people standing further away from the sidewalk so the cars travel at their usual speed and don’t slow down because they see kids. Also, we would have more people in the group so that we could have two people timing at the first pole, one person recording the speeds that they timed, another person alerting the second group of people at the second pole which car the team was recording, another recording the make and model of each car timed and a last teammate at the second pole telling the timers when to stop. Our results were similar to our instructors. As we calculated, most of his speeds were under the speed limit of 15.6 m/s. Only one car went over the speed limit.

            There is not a speeding problem on Cooper Road. All of the cars were going at least 2 m/s under the speed limit. As seen on the graph, no cars traveled over 13.5 m/s, which is under the speed limit of 15.6 m/s. Overall, we discovered that the majority of the cars that drive along Cooper Road maintain a safe speed limit.

           

 

 

 

 

 

 

post-3464-0-20011200-1410548334_thumb.pn

post-3464-0-20011200-1410548334_thumb.pn

post-3464-0-20011200-1410548334_thumb.pn

post-3464-0-20011200-1410548334_thumb.pn

post-3464-0-20011200-1410548334_thumb.pn

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