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Time Travel

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jcstack6

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Many people think time travel is absolutely ludicrous, but one has to consider what kind of time travel they are referring to. To travel back in time is ludicrous, because if this were ever to become possible, there would have been discovered evidence of time travelers from the future that came to our time. Time travel according to Einstein's theory of Relativity, however, is not only plausible, but true. According to Einstein, as one increases the speed at which they travel, the rate of change of time is less for them than it is for an outside observer. Based on this idea, one can travel in time by going at incredibly high speeds. By traveling at high speeds, a person will age slower than an outside observer, showing the person traveling so quickly will have, in essence, time traveled forward. So time travel backward will, most likely, never exist, but time travel forward, if great enough speeds are attainable, is fairly simple to accomplish. 

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That's super interesting. Do you think the human body could go at these high speeds? Would they have to be in some sort of machine or could it be done with some sort of suit?

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1 hour ago, prettybird said:

That's super interesting. Do you think the human body could go at these high speeds? Would they have to be in some sort of machine or could it be done with some sort of suit?

So long the direction of motion didn't change, the human body could most likely handle it. If the body accelerated upwards or downwards would cause the only real problems, as the blood would rush to the feet or head, causing a black-out or red-out, respectively. And a red-out is especially dangerous, by the way, as the excess blood in your head can cause severe damage to the brain.

Aside from that, however, we also have to keep in mind that length of an object drastically decreases at high speeds, meaning that there's the possibility for some adverse effects on the human body from compression, but seeing as how speed of light travel is a long ways away, the last part is just conjecture.

As for the original post, some scientists believe backwards time travel may be possible, but only if an object could travel faster than the speed of light. Considering 3 x 108 m/s is sort of the universal speed limit, that may be impossible, and is definitely not testable with our current means and methods.

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I think this actually happens on the international space station, just on a smaller scale. Pretty sure the name for it is Time Dilation.

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Interstellar is a cool movie similar to this idea, although when they start talking about time travel it becomes sci-fi

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