Jump to content

Phys-X

Sign in to follow this  
  • entries
    30
  • comments
    23
  • views
    1,022

Flopotron

Sign in to follow this  
Shadoof

78 views

A mad scientist over on youtube has made a monstrosity of an instrument, it is made of 2 scanners, 8 hard drives, and 64 floppy drives.... 64...

The reason for all of these strange electronic parts is so that the creator can play many different songs. Now how do you get these parts to sing the sweet sound of music. Well first off what is music, it is a bunch of frequencies all put together to create harmonies that sounds good to the ear. This is exactly what the flopotron is doing, each drive bay is set to a specific frequency and the program that he writes detects the frequency in the song and sends a command to the appropriate floppy drive to spin at that frequency. This is why there are so many floppy drives, so that songs can be faithfully recreated.

While we covered what the floppy bays do, we have not covered the scanners or the hard drives, well the scanners operate on the same idea, except that they are mapped to the lower tones of the song as a scanner normally operates at a lower frequency than a floppy drive. The hard drives very simply act as the drums in the song, now as to how the creator managed to single out the drums in a song I don't know. My best idea is that if the program detects a a very sharp spike in amplitude then it will trigger a hard drive.

 

Sign in to follow this  


1 Comment


Recommended Comments

I've seen this before, and its completely ridiculous. I wanna know how he finds the time to meticulously program each and every song, considering how many parts are involved.

Share this comment


Link to comment

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

Terms of Use

The pages of APlusPhysics.com, Physics in Action podcasts, and other online media at this site are made available as a service to physics students, instructors, and others. Their use is encouraged and is free of charge. Teachers who wish to use materials either in a classroom demonstration format or as part of an interactive activity/lesson are granted permission (and encouraged) to do so. Linking to information on this site is allowed and encouraged, but content from APlusPhysics may not be made available elsewhere on the Internet without the author's written permission.

Copyright Notice

APlusPhysics.com, Silly Beagle Productions and Physics In Action materials are copyright protected and the author restricts their use to online usage through a live internet connection. Any downloading of files to other storage devices (hard drives, web servers, school servers, CDs, etc.) with the exception of Physics In Action podcast episodes is prohibited. The use of images, text and animations in other projects (including non-profit endeavors) is also prohibited. Requests for permission to use such material on other projects may be submitted in writing to info@aplusphysics.com. Licensing of the content of APlusPhysics.com for other uses may be considered in the future.

×