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Momentum in Sports

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jrv12

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The first point of sectional finals, we have serve. Ace. A couple more aces and a big serving run and we are now up 18-3. We end up winning the first set 25-6. 25-6. 25-6, in sectional finals, against Pittsford Sutherland. It is clear now who has the momentum moving forward. 

The momentum from the first set carried us in the next two sets and we end up winning the match and sectional finals.

In a sport, when a team has the "momentum" in the game, it means that they are the ones on the move and will be hard to slow down and stop.

In physics, momentum is the product of mass and velocity, and the equation is p=mv. Therefore, as mass or velocity increases, so does momentum. Momentum is also a vector quantity, so it has a direction to go along with the magnitude. A change in momentum is the impulse which uses the equation J=Ft. It would take a large amount of force in a large time to create a big impulse or change in momentum. Last night, Sutherland started to create an impulse in the second and third set, but it wasn't enough to sway the momentum in their direction.

Here's a video of the final point of the match last night!

 

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Congratulations!!! That was an awesome game to watch! I feel like, in volleyball, having smaller teams on such large courts makes it one of the hardest sports to change momentum in, especially if the team members start getting in their heads. From what I saw last night though, it was obvious you guys had no problem shaking things off and moving onto the next play. That definitely puts your team above many others regardless of skill.  I wish you guy the best of luck moving forward!:goodjob:

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Congrats on Sectionals! A very clever way to mix in physics. I wish I could have made it to the game.

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