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Physics in Food

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crazycrochet20

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At Boston University, the College of Arts and Sciences offers a class called Physics of Food/Cooking. This class combines learning physics with cooking which every person, even those who do not enjoy science, will fall in love with. The professor, Rama Bansil, teaches her students about the basic principles of thermodynamics, molecular physics with a little bit of molecular biology as well. She uses her cooking techniques with science to create treats and relate them to the curriculum.

A perfect example of the idea of physics in food is presented in the video above with a coconut ice cream shell. They use liquid nitrogen to quickly freeze and eliminate the ice crystals that would form with a slow freeze. In doing that, they end up with a creamy coconut ice cream shell!

I really want to take a class like this in college!

Until next time,

RK

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I remember watching a show which followed a chef on the science channel where he put spins on classic dishes for special party events. While he would cook he would explain the science behind said dishes. Most of it concerned molecular gastronomy and was quite interesting, but I can't find the name of the show. Really great post, and a good way to make me hungry!

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