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  2. Name: AP Physics C: Rotational vs. Linear Review (Mechanics) Category: Rotational Motion Date Added: 2017-04-21 Submitter: Flipping Physics Calculus based review and comparison of the linear and rotational equations which are in the AP Physics C mechanics curriculum. Topics include: displacement, velocity, acceleration, uniformly accelerated motion, uniformly angularly accelerated motion, mass, momentum of inertia, kinetic energy, Newton’s second law, force, torque, power, and momentum. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Displacement 038 Velocity 1:08 Acceleration 1:33 Uniformly Accelerated Motion 2:15 Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion 2:34 Mass 3:19 Kinetic Energy 3:44 Newton’s Second Law 4:18 Force and Torque 5:12 Power 5:45 Momentum Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 2 of 2 (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video. AP Physics C: Rotational vs. Linear Review (Mechanics)
  3. Calculus based review and comparison of the linear and rotational equations which are in the AP Physics C mechanics curriculum. Topics include: displacement, velocity, acceleration, uniformly accelerated motion, uniformly angularly accelerated motion, mass, momentum of inertia, kinetic energy, Newton’s second law, force, torque, power, and momentum. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:12 Displacement 038 Velocity 1:08 Acceleration 1:33 Uniformly Accelerated Motion 2:15 Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion 2:34 Mass 3:19 Kinetic Energy 3:44 Newton’s Second Law 4:18 Force and Torque 5:12 Power 5:45 Momentum Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 2 of 2 (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video.
  4. Calculus based review of the cross product torque equation, how to do a unit vector cross product problem, rotational equilibrium, the rotational form of Newton’s second law, the angular momentum of a particle and of a rigid object with shape, the derivation of conservation of angular momentum, and a conservation of angular momentum example problem which reviews a lot of the pieces necessary to understand conservation of angular momentum. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:15 The cross product torque equation 1:10 Unit vector cross product example problem 3:32 Rotational equilibrium definition 4:55 Rotational form of Newton’s second law 5:37 Angular momentum of a particle 7:08 Angular momentum of a rigid object with shape 7:49 Conservation of angular momentum derivation 8:57 Conservation of angular momentum example problem 10:57 Visualizing the problem 12:04 The conservation of angular momentum equation 12:54 Solving for the constant value of the variable y. 14:04 Substituting in known values 15:38 Does our variable answer make sense? Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Rotational vs. Linear Review (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 1 of 2 (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video.
  5. Name: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 2 of 2 (Mechanics) Category: Rotational Motion Date Added: 2017-04-16 Submitter: Flipping Physics Calculus based review of the cross product torque equation, how to do a unit vector cross product problem, rotational equilibrium, the rotational form of Newton’s second law, the angular momentum of a particle and of a rigid object with shape, the derivation of conservation of angular momentum, and a conservation of angular momentum example problem which reviews a lot of the pieces necessary to understand conservation of angular momentum. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:15 The cross product torque equation 1:10 Unit vector cross product example problem 3:32 Rotational equilibrium definition 4:55 Rotational form of Newton’s second law 5:37 Angular momentum of a particle 7:08 Angular momentum of a rigid object with shape 7:49 Conservation of angular momentum derivation 8:57 Conservation of angular momentum example problem 10:57 Visualizing the problem 12:04 The conservation of angular momentum equation 12:54 Solving for the constant value of the variable y. 14:04 Substituting in known values 15:38 Does our variable answer make sense? Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 1 of 2 (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video. AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 2 of 2 (Mechanics)
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  7. Name: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 1 of 2 (Mechanics) Category: Rotational Motion Date Added: 2017-04-09 Submitter: Flipping Physics Calculus based review of moment of inertia for a system of particles and a rigid object with shape, the derivation of rotational kinetic energy, derivations of the following moments of inertia: Uniform Thin Hoop about is Cylindrical Axis, Uniform Rigid Rod about its Center of Mass and about one end, also the parallel axis theorem, torque, the rotational form of Newton’s Second Law, pulleys with mass and the force of tension, the Right Hand Rule for direction of torque, and rolling with and without slipping. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:10 Moment of Inertia of a system of particles derivation 1:46 Rotational Kinetic Energy derivation 2:49 Moment of Inertia of a rigid object with shape derivation 3:52 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Thin Hoop about its Cylindrical Axis derivation 5:31 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Rigid Rod about its Center of Mass derivation 8:02 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Rigid Rod about one end derivation 9:16 The Parallel Axis Theorem 11:29 Torque 12:21 Simple torque diagram 14:14 Rotational form of Newton’s Second Law 15:07 Pulleys with mass and the Force of Tension 15:33 The Right Hand Rule the for the direction of torque 16:56 Rolling without Slipping 17:40 Rolling with Slipping Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video. AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 1 of 2 (Mechanics)
  8. Calculus based review of moment of inertia for a system of particles and a rigid object with shape, the derivation of rotational kinetic energy, derivations of the following moments of inertia: Uniform Thin Hoop about is Cylindrical Axis, Uniform Rigid Rod about its Center of Mass and about one end, also the parallel axis theorem, torque, the rotational form of Newton’s Second Law, pulleys with mass and the force of tension, the Right Hand Rule for direction of torque, and rolling with and without slipping. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:10 Moment of Inertia of a system of particles derivation 1:46 Rotational Kinetic Energy derivation 2:49 Moment of Inertia of a rigid object with shape derivation 3:52 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Thin Hoop about its Cylindrical Axis derivation 5:31 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Rigid Rod about its Center of Mass derivation 8:02 Moment of Inertia of a Uniform Rigid Rod about one end derivation 9:16 The Parallel Axis Theorem 11:29 Torque 12:21 Simple torque diagram 14:14 Rotational form of Newton’s Second Law 15:07 Pulleys with mass and the Force of Tension 15:33 The Right Hand Rule the for the direction of torque 16:56 Rolling without Slipping 17:40 Rolling with Slipping Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: Review of Rotational Dynamics for AP Physics C: Mechanics - Part 2 of 2 Previous Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Sawdog for being my Quality Control individual for this video.
  9. Google is your friend: http://electron6.phys.utk.edu/101/CH7/phase_transitions.htm
  10. acts like a wire
  11. What do you mean by "short"?
  12. So in the phase diagram, since the temeprature doesn't change while phase changing, does the internal energy also not change?
  13. Name: AP Physics C: Rotational Kinematics Review (Mechanics) Category: Uniform Circular Motion Date Added: 2017-04-05 Submitter: Flipping Physics Calculus based review of instantaneous and average angular velocity and acceleration, uniformly angularly accelerated motion, arc length, the derivation of tangential velocity, the derivation of tangential acceleration, uniform circular motion, centripetal acceleration, centripetal force, non-uniform circular motion, and the derivation of the relationship between angular velocity and period. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:10 Instantaneous and Average Angular Velocity and Acceleration 1:14 Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion 2:16 Arc Length 3:22 Tangential Velocity Derivation 4:29 Tangential Acceleration Derivation 6:03 Uniform Circular Motion and Centripetal Acceleration 8:04 Centripetal Force 9:20 Non-Uniform Circular Motion 10:21 Angular Velocity and Period Relationship Derivation Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Previous Video: AP Physics C: Momentum, Impulse, Collisions and Center of Mass Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Natasha Trousdale, Aarti Sangwan, and Jen Larson for being my Quality Control team for this video. AP Physics C: Rotational Kinematics Review (Mechanics)
  14. Calculus based review of instantaneous and average angular velocity and acceleration, uniformly angularly accelerated motion, arc length, the derivation of tangential velocity, the derivation of tangential acceleration, uniform circular motion, centripetal acceleration, centripetal force, non-uniform circular motion, and the derivation of the relationship between angular velocity and period. For the calculus based AP Physics C mechanics exam. Want Lecture Notes? Content Times: 0:10 Instantaneous and Average Angular Velocity and Acceleration 1:14 Uniformly Angularly Accelerated Motion 2:16 Arc Length 3:22 Tangential Velocity Derivation 4:29 Tangential Acceleration Derivation 6:03 Uniform Circular Motion and Centripetal Acceleration 8:04 Centripetal Force 9:20 Non-Uniform Circular Motion 10:21 Angular Velocity and Period Relationship Derivation Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! AP Physics C Review Website Next Video: AP Physics C: Rotational Dynamics Review - 1 of 2 (Mechanics) Previous Video: AP Physics C: Momentum, Impulse, Collisions and Center of Mass Review (Mechanics) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Natasha Trousdale, Aarti Sangwan, and Jen Larson for being my Quality Control team for this video.
  15. mad skimpy yo
  16. Not many people put a whole lot of thought into what their morning cereal is made of. Most people would just assume there's some grain and maybe a little sugar, or a lot of sugar if you're more of a Lucky Charms person than a Raisin Bran person. Nobody would suspect, though, that there would be metal in their Cheerios. Turns out, Cheerios are magnetic. Or are they? Fill a bowl with water and drop in a couple Cheerios. Take a magnet and hold it just above the Cheerios, the Cheerio will be attracted toward the direction of the magnet. Why is this? If the little cereal ring is magnetic, then there must be metal fragments in it causing the attraction. Now the cereal is all magnetic, and it does contain tiny fragment of iron. This is perfectly reasonable though, as iron is a key nutrient in a human diet. But that's not the whole story, If you were to try this with objects other than cereal, say a small piece of paper or plastic, it would still seem to be attracted to the magnet as it floated in the water. The "attraction" you see is actually all about water, which is diamagnetic, meaning it generates a magnetic field opposite to that of the magnetic field it is in the presence of. Thus, the water is slightly repelled by the magnet. This causes a slight divot in the water, that the object in the bowl actually falls into, making it appear to follow the magnet. In actuality, it isn't being affected directly by the magnetic field, but by the waters reaction to the magnetic field.
  17. Sounds like you'll have a head start on our "post-AP" project!
  18. Not quite sure I understand what "Mr. Fullerton is for the boys" means, but glad to hear you've gotten something out of the course. I, too, am glad you've stuck with it. Couple more weeks of pushing and the finish line is in sight!
  19. I was right with you up to the part where you said "it isn't that horrible of a movie." The missus made me sit through it once. The post-viewing fever lasted three days. I was right with you up to the part where you said "it isn't that horrible of a movie." The missus made me sit through it once. The post-viewing fever lasted three days.
  20. And of course there's that whole "Gallifrey and the Daleks are time-locked" complication. As corny and goofy as the show is, what always impresses me is the quality of the writing... and I'm really enjoying the fact that my 7-year-old is now all about watching Doctor Who with her dad whenever mom isn't home (Mommy would find it 'inappropriate.')
  21. So thrilled you've enjoyed the course. Recognizing it's the most technically challenging (as well as highest workload), and coupling that with an exceedingly frustrating instructor who is happy to sit back and let you struggle, you've done a mighty nice job in stepping up to the challenge. Only a couple weeks left... don't let up!
  22. You're on the home stretch of a mighty difficult course, not just in content but also in terms of level of independence. You've done well -- keep it up for just a few more weeks!
  23. Sure been nice having you in here!
  24. When a person swings a baseball bat and hit a ball with a wooden bat rather than a aluminum bat, it will generally not travel nearly as far. Why is this? This is a concept of momentum on the baseball field. The biggest reason for the ability for a person to hit a ball further with an aluminum bat is because when they do, they are able to swing the accelerate the bat to higher speeds than if they were to use a wooden bat. Momentum is directly proportional to velocity therefore the faster the swing of the bat the further the ball with travel in most cases.
  25. A common item such as a Frisbee has very complex physics concepts that explain why it behaves a certain way. The two main physical concepts behind the Frisbee are aerodynamic lift and gyroscopic inertia. The two main aerodynamic forces acting on a Frisbee are the drag and lift forces, these forces have a relation ship with one another and is used in order to determine the magnitude of either force. The rotation of a Frisbee is a necessary component in the mechanics of how a Frisbee flies. Without rotation, a Frisbee would just flutte rto the ground like a falling leaf and fail to produce the long distance flight that it does when thrown the right way. This is caused by the fact the aerodynamic forces are directly centered on the frisbee. In general, the lift on the front half of the disc is slightly larger than the lift on the back half which causes a torque on the Frisbee. When a Frisbee isn’t spinning, this small torque flips the front of the disc up, and any chance for a stable flight is lost.
  26. Swimming is a popular activity, both for recreation and competition. The physics of swimming involves an interaction of forces between the water and the swimmer. It is these forces which propel a swimmer through the water. When a person swims there are more forces acting upon them than you might think. First off a swimmer must push off the water in order to create thrusting force generally parrallel to the surface of the water, There is also the force of gravity on a person working in the y-direction however much of this force in cancelled out by the force of buoyancy. Lastly there is also some kinds of drag force That acts similar to a force of friction in the direction opposite of that the swimmer is moving in.
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