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happytoast

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About happytoast

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  1. happytoast

    physics of football

    Football seems pretty stupid to me. Athletes line up across from eachother, then run at eachother as fast as they can. However, football is my favorite sport to watch. There is alot of large forces coliding in football. Every colision can be related back to physics. The force of anything is determind by its mass and acceleration. The larger the mass of an athlete and the more acceleration an athelete has the larger the force the athlete can produce. NFL players can produce large forces on eachother. This leads to big hits and head injuries.
  2. happytoast

    physics of rocking chairs

    Rocking chairs are by far the coolest chairs. Someone should invent a rocking sofa. I'd buy it. There's alot of physics that goes into the rocking back and forth of a rocking chair. The motion is started by the person sitting in the rocking chair. Utilizing the strenght of their legs they push against the ground. This causes the chair to rock upwards. Then the chair rocks downward due to the curved nature of the chairs base and newton's second law, every force has an equal opposite force. Thus the rocking chair begins its journey rocking back and forth. Thats why rocking chairs are dope.
  3. happytoast

    snowboardin n physics

    Snowboarding is my favorite thing to do. Carving into the mountain and gliding down its smooth surface makes me smile. Physics plays a huge role in snowboarding. Newton's third law, any force has equal but opposite force, directly applies to snowboarding. When carving on a snowboard, the rider exerts a force on one edge of the snowboard and the snow on the mountain counteracts this force allowing the snowboarder to carve into the mountain. Being abble to understand physics and apply it to things such as snowboarding has improved my life alot.
  4. happytoast

    lacrosse

    Ive been playing lacrosse for a pretty long time now. Yet ive neglected to notice the physics that apply to lacrosse until i began taking physics my junior year. Now i realize that many concepts i learn in the classroom apply to me on the lacrosse field. For example, every time I take a shot, the path of the ball becomes a projectile. The velocity and placement of the ball are determined by the force i apply to it and the downward acceleration of gravity on the ball. Also, while shooting creating torque by twisting your shoulders and core creates a greater force to be applied to the ball as it leaves the stick of the player. Players that have perfected this can shoot pretty fast, the fastest shot ever recorded is 114 mph.
  5. happytoast

    scootin and stuff

    Hello everyone, earlier today i was riding a pretty cool scooter. The scooter has two wheels in the back and one in the front. The two back wheels are positioned in a way that enables the rider to drift/ make verysharp turns. This relates to dinamic motion in physics. The shifting of the mass of the rider of the scooter side to side proppels the scooter forward. Also, when preforming a turn the rider utalizes the swindiling back wheels to sharpley turn. This video will demonstrate:
  6. happytoast

    peanut butter n jellyin

    As I learn more and more in my regents physics class i realize that everyting we accomplish in our lives outside the physics classroom can be directly related to what we discover inside the classroom. Even making sandwiches filled with delicious peanutbutter and strawberry jelly can be applied to physics. The force used to spread the jelly and peanutbutter on the bread is an example of horizontal motion, the more force applied the smoother the spread. Increasing the velocity in which you spread at will ultimately determine the quality of your sandwhich. Heres a video to demonstrate.
  7. happytoast

    Determining g Lab Deliverable

    History was made today at Irondequoit High School, three students determined the accleration due to gravity. They named the constant accleration due to gravity "g". The students discovered this after a series of experiments. The first experiment they conducted involved examining the acceleration of a ball dropped from 2.8 metters. After three trials the average time it took for the ball to reach the floor was .69s. From here the students used kinematic equations to determine the acceleration of the ball was roughly 11.76 m/s2. The students did however determine they had a 19.88% of error. Never the less the students at Irondequoit highschool made a significant scientific discovery. Ian, Celeena, Riley
  8. happytoast

    skateboardin

    Hello, my name is Ian and i enjoy skateboarding. This year i decided to take physics and while learning about the concepts of motion I realized these concepts are directly related to skateboarding. Physics can be applied to everything, the understanding and comprehension of physics can also help me in my progresion of skating. To move while skateboarding the rider uses the force of pushing their foot against the ground to increase their velocity. The greater force applied the more velocity is achieved. In the following link is a video of a dog skateboarding, You'll notice how the dog applies a force to the ground with it's legs to create motion and increase velocity. The more frequent the dog pushes the more velocity is achieved.
  9. happytoast

    Speeding Lab

    Riley McGwin, Jack Bowes, Ian Eckert, Baillie Latour, Sabrina Jade Vinas As a part of the Irondequoit police department safety project our group was asked to gather data to determine whether or not speeding was an issue on cooper road in front of Irondequoit high school. The speed limit set by the town is 35 mph but we were skeptical about if people actually followed the law. Our project used a pool of 10 randomly selected vehicles and judged their speed based on the time it took them to travel 3 intervals of ten meters. We then took the measures and calculated the speed that they would in miles per hour. This is how we would figure out if the people were speeding down this road or obeying the law. Draw a data table that was big enough for 10 cars and could fit an area for the increments of 10 metersWe then laid out our 3 increments 10 meters apart with tape on the side walk parallel to Cooper Rd. We randomly chose one car at a time. Then when the car reached the starting point we would have one person tell us to start our stop watches Then when the front of the car reached an increment the person would stop the watch. We would record all the times onto the data table. Repeat steps 3-6 another 9 times Then we went on the computer and calculated the average speed of each car into meters per second. Then we figured out the average speed of all the cars. After collecting our data we found out that no one was exceeding the speed limit down Cooper Rd. Our data shows that a lot of the people went under 13.3 m/s. This is well under the speed limit set by the town. We could improve our results by using a radar gun to measure the speed of the cars at that exact moment. There was not a problem with speeding on Cooper Rd. This was proven by all the results we collected.
  10. happytoast

    About Me

    riley that's awesome cant wait to learn
  11. happytoast

    All About Me

    wow that's so interesting I like to swim too!
  12. happytoast

    ians dope

    Hello I'm Ian, I go to west Irondequoit high school and I'm starting my junior year. I've been playing lacrosse sense the second grade and I hate it more after each year goes by. I like to snowboard and hang out with my friends. I also like to scooter. Scooting is my passion and I hope to make a career out of it. My reasoning for taking physics is that I thought it would be easier than chemistry for me. Physics also interests me more than chemistry. Lastly I thought that physics could aid my comprehension of scooting and the science behind it.

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