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Flipping Physics

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Flipping Physics last won the day on January 5 2017

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About Flipping Physics

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    Physics Instructor
  • Birthday 04/16/1973

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    http://www.flippingphysics.com

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  1. A hollow sphere, solid sphere, and thin hoop are simultaneously released from rest at the top of an #incline. Which will reach the bottom first? Assume all objects are of uniform density. #RollingWithoutSlipping Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:12 The problem 0:46 #ConservationOfEnergy 2:22 General solution 3:55 The order of the objects 5:20 The demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Rolling Acceleration Down an Incline Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  2. Example: Determine the #Acceleration of a uniform, solid cylinder #RollingWithoutSlipping down an #Incline with incline angle θ. The rotational inertia of a uniform, solid cylinder about its long cylindrical axis is ½MR^2. Assume the cylinder starts from rest. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:07 The problem 0:43 #ConservationOfEnergy 2:32 Rolling without Slipping 3:32 Displacement and height 5:12 Understanding our solution 6:16 Demonstrating our answer Next Video: Which Will Be First? (Rolling Down an Incline) Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Rolling Without Slipping Introduction and Demonstrations Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  3. Rolling without Slipping is demonstrated and the equation for velocity of the center of mass is derived. A cycloid is demonstrated. Kinetic energy, distance, and acceleration of rolling without slipping is discussed. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:06 #RollingWithoutSlipping 0:28 #Cycloid 1:15 Translation and Rotational 3:13 Center of Mass Velocity 4:10 Resultant Velocity 4:37 Kinetic Energy 4:58 Distance and Acceleration Next Video: Rolling Acceleration Down an Incline Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Torque - Mass on Plank with String Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  4. Example: A 0.300 kg mass rests on a 0.395 m long, 0.764 kg, uniform wooden plank supported by a string as shown in the figure. If the mass is 0.274 m from the wall and the angle between the string and the plank is 32.1°, (a) What is the force of tension in the string? and (b) What is the normal force from the wall? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:07 The problem 1:17 The free body diagram 3:45 Net torque 5:41 Substituting in numbers 6:53 Net force 8:02 The demonstration Next Video: Rolling Without Slipping Introduction and Demonstrations Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: 2 Masses on a Pulley - Conservation of Energy Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  5. Example: Mass 1 and mass 2 hang from either side of a frictionless #pulley with #rotationalInertia, I, and radius, R. What is the angular acceleration of the pulley? Use #ConservationOfEnergy Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:07 The problem 1:01 Conservation of Energy 2:29 The mechanical energies 4:07 Solving the problem 5:57 Using arc length Next Video: Torque - Mass on Plank with String Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: 2 Masses on a Pulley - Torque Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Faiaz Rahman for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  6. Example: 0.100 kg and 0.200 kg masses hang from either side of a frictionless #Pulley with a rotational inertia of 0.0137 kg·m^2 and radius of 0.0385 m. (a) What is the #AngularAcceleration of the pulley? (b) What is the #TensionForce in each string? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:08 The problem 1:29 The free body diagrams 2:51 Net torque on the pulley 4:28 Net forces on both masses 6:49 Tangentail acceleration 7:31 Solving for acceleration 8:55 Measuring acceleration 10:16 Solving for Tension 12:29 2 incorrect solutions Next Video: 2 Masses on a Pulley - Conservation of Energy Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Using Integrals to Derive Rotational Inertia of a Long, Thin Rod with Demonstration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Faiaz Rahman for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  7. We use integrals to derive the #rotationalinertia of a uniform, long, thin rod. And we demonstrate our answer is correct using a Rotational Inertia Demonstrator. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 😄 Mechanics Topic. Content Times: 0:15 Rotational Inertia 0:42 Linear Mass Density 1:51 About Center of Mass 3:02 About an End 4:27 Rotational Inertia Demonstrator (RID) 6:09 About Center of RID 7:03 Comparing our answers 7:43 Demonstrating our answer Next Video: 2 Masses on a Pulley - Torque Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Graphing the Rotational Inertia of an Irregular Shape Previous Video: How the Force of Tension on a Pulley Changes with Acceleration Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Faiaz Rahman for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  8. We predict and measure the force of tension acting on a pulley while the system is at rest and accelerating. #PulleyTensionForce Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:20 The data 0:45 Review 1:15 Tension while at rest 2:45 Accelerating tension Next Video: Using Integrals to Derive Rotational Inertia of a Long, Thin Rod with Demonstration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Graphing the Rotational Inertia of an Irregular Shape Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Faiaz Rahman for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  9. We determine what data to collect to create a graph with rotational inertia as the slope of the best-fit line. #RotationalInertia - Then we collect the data and determine the rotational inertia of an irregular shape. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:11 The problem 0:46 Free Body Diagram 1:31 Net Torque 3:01 Trial #1 3:52 Angular Acceleration 5:20 12 Trials and Graph 6:29 Deriving Units Next Video: How the Force of Tension on a Pulley Changes with Acceleration Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Painter on a Scaffold - Don't Fall Off!! Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Christopher Becke and Faiaz Rahman for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  10. Example: What is the closest to the end of a 93 g uniform meterstick you can place a 200.0 g object and have the system stay balanced? The meterstick is supported at the 20.0 cm and 80.0 cm marks. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:03 A scaffold 0:33 The problem 1:28 Free body diagram 2:06 Net torque 3:34 Force Normal demo 4:28 Solving the problem 6:17 Testing our answer Next Video: Graphing the Rotational Inertia of an Irregular Shape Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Placing the Fulcrum on a Seesaw Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  11. Example: A 200.0 g mass is placed at the 20.0 cm mark on a uniform 93 g meterstick. A 100.0 g mass is placed at the 90.0 cm mark. Where on the meterstick should the fulcrum be placed to balance the system? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:01 Seesaw 0:33 The problem 1:28 The fulcrum 2:14 Free body diagram 2:38 Net force 3:35 Net torque 5:49 Combining equations 7:11 Testing our answer 8:11 Alternate solution Next Video: Painter on a Scaffold - Don't Fall Off!! Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Rotational Equilibrium Problem Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  12. A uniform 0.093 kg meterstick is supported at the 15 cm and 92 cm marks. When a 0.250 kg object is placed at the 6.0 cm mark, what are the magnitudes of the forces supporting the meterstick? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:07 The problem 1:35 Summing the forces 2:55 Summing the torques 5:17 Combining equations 6:04 Torque distances 7:14 The units!! 8:20 Finding Force Normal 1 9:26 Testing our answers Next Video: Placing the Fulcrum on a Seesaw Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Rotational Equilibrium Introduction (and Static Equilibrium too!!) Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  13. An introduction to Rotational Equilibrium with a review of Translational Equilibrium and demonstrations. Wait there’s more … Static Equilibrium! Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:07 Reviewing Translational Equilibrium 1:21 Visualizing Translational Equilibrium 2:07 Rotational Equilibrium Introduction 3:09 Visualizing Rotational Equilibrium 4:22 Static Equilibrium Next Video: Introductory Rotational Equilibrium Problem Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: (2 of 2) Measuring the Rotational Inertia of a Bike Wheel Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  14. 1) Calculating if our answer makes sense. 2) Why can’t we sum the torques on everything? 3) Finding the force of tension. Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:01 Reviewing from last time 1:08 Does it make sense? 2:41 Calculating the fraction 3:41 Sum the torques on everything? 6:07 Solving for force of tension 8:24 Testing our answer Next Video: Rotational Equilibrium Introduction (and Static Equilibrium too!!) Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: (1 of 2) Measuring the Rotational Inertia of a Bike Wheel Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, and Jonathan Everett for being my Quality Control Team for this video.
  15. That’s right, we actually measure the rotational inertia of a bicycle wheel. How cool is that? Want Lecture Notes? This is an AP Physics 1 Topic. Content Times: 0:10 Basic setup 0:44 Free Body Diagram 1:30 Finding net torque 3:10 Finding force of tension 4:51 Linear and angular acceleration 5:42 Uniformly angularly accelerated motion 7:00 What do we need to know? 7:35 Solving the problem Next Video: (2 of 2) Measuring the Rotational Inertia of a Bike Wheel Multilingual? Please help translate Flipping Physics videos! Previous Video: Introductory Rotational Form of Newton's Second Law Problem Please support me on Patreon! Thank you to Scott Carter, Christopher Becke, Jonathan Everett, and Faiaz Rahman for being my Quality Control Team for this video.

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