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Entries in this blog

 

Direction of Magnetism

A tool that provides direction by the use of magnetism is based on the basis of physics. This tool, the compass, has been used for many centuries and helped guide history through various explorations. Today, this tool is not used as much as it had been in the past but if you are ever lost it is a great instrument to help you find your way. Magnetism is one of the first bits of science students learn about in school and just about the first thing we discover is that like poles repel opposite p

Quinn

Quinn

 

Flashlight Physics

As the end of the school year comes to an end I am becoming ecstatic just thinking about camping. Every year, my family goes to the Thousand Islands and camps out. During that week we spend our time swimming, jet skiing and hanging around the campfire. That is a week I look forward to every year. A very useful tool that needs to be brought every year is a flashlight. We need this instrument because walking around at night can become directionless without know in which way your destination is. Th

Quinn

Quinn

 

Television Remote

Even though the month of March had gone by fast , it is a month of television watching and switching through various channels. This phenomenon is all because of one event: March Madness. Overall, those two weeks I had spent a good portion of my time at home in front of a screen. So when it was time to write a blog post electricity became an easy topic to write about. Especially because during class we had recently finished a unit on electricity. From what I have learned in class as well as d

Quinn

Quinn

 

Physics of Lacrosse

Spring is one of my favorite seasons because for me that means it is lacrosse season! During practice one day when I was trying to think of a topic for a blog post it became obvious to me that lacrosse is a perfect example of physics in action in my life. Newton's Three Laws really became the primacies at which I was able to figure out the physics within this sport. Newton's First Law: An object at rest will remain at rest until acted up by an external force. In the case of lacrosse, the net cra

Quinn

Quinn

 

Dodgeball

This weekend I was involved on the Dodge for Josh Dodgeball Tournament. This tournament raised money for the Josh Rojas Foundation. This event proved how physics can not only be fun but at times can also be painful. In the game of dodgeball the entire objective is to create and form collisions. In this sport there are two typees of collisions, inealastic and elastic. One can witness the collisions by watching a player get hit by a ball or when two balls collide into one another. IN an elastic co

Quinn

Quinn

 

Slipping on a Street

Since the price of salt has increased and as a result the streets will be more dangerous to drive and walk on a question came to mind: Why do people slip? After beginning to fully understand the logic behind friction I figured out a basic understanding of why it happens. When we walk, we need friction between our shoes and the ground to give us the ability to move forwards. Without friction we would not be able to remain standing for very long, let alone walking. If at some stage the amount of

Quinn

Quinn

 

Sledding

Since it is winter I cannot wait to sled. This year since I am in physics I want to understand sledding better by using Newton’s laws of motion. Newton's First Law of Motion, the Law of Inertia, states that an object's velocity will not change unless it is acted on by an outside force. The greater mass or velocity an object has, the greater its inertia. For example, it takes a pretty strong push to get you and a friend on the same sled moving, but once you gather speed you'll keep going even

Quinn

Quinn

 

Trumpet

Frequency: At any point in the air near the source of sound, the molecules are moving backwards and forwards, and the air pressure varies up and down by very small amounts. The number of vibrations per second is called the frequency (f). It is measured in cycles per second or Hertz (Hz). The pitch of a note is almost entirely determined by the frequency: high frequency for high pitch and low for low. Human ears are most sensitive to sounds between 1 and 4 kHz - about two to four octaves above mi

Quinn

Quinn

 

Hockey

When skating, the skates of a hockey player do two things: They glide over the ice and they push off the ice with the edge, in order to gain speed. The physical properties of ice is what allows hockey players to maneuver the way they do. For instance, the low friction of the skate blade with the ice and the physical properties of the ice is what allows a player to speed up, or stop. A hockey player propels himself forward by pushing off the ice with a force perpendicular to the skate blade. Sinc

Quinn

Quinn

 

Skiing

The motion of a skier is determined by the physical principles of the conservation of energy and the frictional forces acting on the body. For example, in downhill skiing, as the skier is accelerated down the hill by the force of gravity, his gravitational potential energy is converted to kinetic energy, the energy of motion. In the ideal case, all of the potential energy would be converted into kinetic energy; in reality, some of the energy is lost to heat due to friction. One type of friction

Quinn

Quinn

 

Bouncing a Ball

During volleyball practice during a water break I was bouncing a ball, so I thought of all the physics within the simple movement of the ball hitting the floor then hitting my hand. The simple act of bouncing a ball is more physics than meets the eye. I The ball moves vertically (up and down) and horizontally (moving forward). With each bounce, and each step the vertical and horizontal distance/ height, seconds in the air and velocity was constantly changing. Also as the ball falls it accelerat

Quinn

Quinn

 

Quinn's First Blog

Hi! My name is Quinn and I am a Junior at Irondequoit High School. I am involved in many sports such as basketball, volleyball and lacrosse. I love to play sports because I am able to workout and stay in shape while having fun with my friends. Last year I took Chemistry with Mr. Meredith and he told me last year that if you are going into the medical field physics is an important course to take. So I followed his advise and I am now in physics with Mr. Fullerton. I can not wait to see what th

Quinn

Quinn

 

Stretching a Rubber Band

Today my brother shot me with rubber band. As I began to shot it right back at him, I started to wonder if stretching a rubber band has anything to do with physics. I figured our that stretching a rubber band is a great was to apply and explain forces. Force is a push or a pull motion. Many forces are acting on all the time, especially gravity. The force of gravity is acting on us all of the time. I is weird to think that if I am standing perfectly still on the floor, the floor is pushing u

Quinn

Quinn

 

Newtons Law and Running

Like many athletes running can be part of a game, consequence or a way to stay in shape during your season.Running does not offer only exercise; it also provides a demonstration of the many types of physics involved in moving the human body.Running also offers an excellent model to study the impact of external forces on bodies in motion. The physics of running is grounded in Newton's Three Laws of Motion. However we have only begun to learn his first two laws in class. In order to break into

Quinn

Quinn

 

Physics in Volleyball

Hi! My name is Quinn and I am a player on the girls varsity volleyball team. Volleyball is a fun and active game that suprisingly enough involves a lot of physics. Watching or playing a volleyball game is an excellent way to see the principles of physics in action. Here are a few of the basic principles of physics, explained through volleyball. Whether you are serving, bumping, or spiking, gravity will affect every interaction you have with the ball. But gravity i not the only principle exp

Quinn

Quinn

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