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ThePeculiarParticle

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Blog Comments posted by ThePeculiarParticle


  1. I remember watching a show which followed a chef on the science channel where he put spins on classic dishes for special party events. While he would cook he would explain the science behind said dishes. Most of it concerned molecular gastronomy and was quite interesting, but I can't find the name of the show. Really great post, and a good way to make me hungry!


  2. Congratulations!!! That was an awesome game to watch! I feel like, in volleyball, having smaller teams on such large courts makes it one of the hardest sports to change momentum in, especially if the team members start getting in their heads. From what I saw last night though, it was obvious you guys had no problem shaking things off and moving onto the next play. That definitely puts your team above many others regardless of skill.  I wish you guy the best of luck moving forward!:goodjob:


  3. This was a very interesting blog post. I just wanted to add that there was one commercial airline that went above the speed of sound that I can think of off the top of my head. It was retired in 2003 and was known as the Concorde. It flew at Mach 2.04 (1354 MPH) and could hold up to 128 passengers!!!! It was known for crossing the Atlantic Ocean from NYC to London in 3.5 hours. It was definitely a more expensive option than most flights, but could hold large numbers of people. The engineering behind it is fascinating from its drooping nose, to the structural expansion and compression it needed to withstand, and how it endured high temperatures. If you are interested, there are a lot of great videos on the science behind it on YouTube.

    I agree with you totally on your point that if Mach travel can be achieved commercially, and most importantly cheaply, then a new age of transportation will begin. Who knows, maybe you can be the guy to figure it out.


  4. There is a very interesting phenomena I saw in a video recently where olive oil is used to calm a lake's surface. It works on the principle that the oil thinly coats the lake's surface and the wind does not have the same amount of "grip" on the surface as it would water due to a lack of friction. The result is a calm lake under windy skies.

    Video: 

     

     


  5. So, knowing that Onix has a mass of 210 kg, and the volume of a Poké Ball is .000134 m^3, and say this monster could magically be compacted into that space without any damage, then the density inside that filled Poké Ball is 1,567,164.179 kg/m^3. Besides needing to carry a 210 kg ball around everywhere :gym: there is another problem. To put that in perspective our sun's inner core is calculated to be 150,000 kg/m^3. YIKES... there must be another way they need to be stored without carrying around a pocket nuclear fusion reactor.


  6. As a member of the same volleyball team, I can vouch that you have earned the nickname of "Softest Hands in Section V". Also, if you ever wish to start a band, I could be your upright or electric bassist. We already have these cool usernames for our band member names, and I believe we could create some sick physics parodies. I'm glad to see you came up to this level of physics, and I wish you the best this year. We will definitely be in the same boat. 

    -ThePeculiarParticle

    • Haha 1

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