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Cookie question: Military Physics

A friend returned from training for the air force and told me about some of the crazy things that he and his comrades would do to pass the time. Some of these included taping each other to the ceiling and human-drawn chariot races, but one of the most messy and fun instances he described was a hallway slip n' slide. True story: he and his hall mates put towels to the bottom of their sleeping quarter doorways, filled the hall with soap and water and proceeded to slide down the hallway as though i

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Electric organ

Hi everyone! I thought this would be applicable since we're in the electricity and magnetism portion of the year In electric fish, such as an eel or a ray, there is a body part called an "electric organ." This mass of muscle and/or nerve cells produce an electric current when the fish sees fit. It is used for protection, navigation, communication and sometimes (but not often) against prey. The organ itself consists of a group of connected electrocytes, through which the current passes throug

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Electricity in the Brain

More electricity-themed blog posts! Neurons are cells in the nervous system. This cell transfers information via chemical and electrical signals. The long, stem-like part of a nerve cell is called the axon. In the human body, the axons that run from your spinal chord to your feet can be over a meter long. Electrical pulses are transferred through the axon down to the neurotransmitter molecules. The membrane potential of the average neuron cell is between -60 and -80 mV when the cell is not t

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Physics Equations: E&M

Part 2 of the equation posts: E&M. Again, if you see any mistakes or have a few equations to add, make sure to utilize the comment section! I'll add it in right away. Electrostatics E= Fe/q = kq/r λ = Q/L ρ = Q/V σ = Q/A Electric potential Ue = kq1q2/r F = -dU/dl V = k ∑ qi/ri = W/q ∆V= Vb - Va = ∫ab E dl = ∆U/q Gauss's Law: Conductors Esurface= Vinside = Einside = Capacitor C=Q/V = Uc = Ue = field energy density = Energy = V/d C=

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Little Italian men, weapons and screeching women

...can all be found at a fencing tournament! It's about time that fencing found it's way onto this forum. Fencing is an Olympic sport consisting of three weapons, epee, sabre and foil. In foil and epee, the opponent must hit their opponent's target area with their tip in order to score a touch. In sabre, the fencer may hit with the tip and/or the side of the blade to score a touch. [ATTACH=CONFIG]542[/ATTACH] I stumbled upon these fencing related physics applications by Ann McBain Ezzell, a

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Test Prep Splash

Hi everyone, just figured that I'd post an accumulation of what I've been studying for the test tomorrow morning. It goes in video order because that's the order that I learned the material in. If something is too vague, I reccomed looking at the video for elaboration Circuits Current and Current Density Resistors and Resistance Circuits Voltmeters and Ammeters Ideal and Real Batteries RC Circuits: Steady State RC Circuits: Transient Analysis (Charging) Current and Current Density:

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Pokemon physics... For a cookie!

*yawn* It's a beautiful Tuesday morning and you've awoken from camping in the jagged pass. You stow your tent into the key items pocket and continue on your trek to Lavaridge Town. You're on your merry way, thinking fondly of a dip in the hot springs, when the grass in front of you begins to rustle! Oh my, a Spoink appeared! Adrenaline pulses through your veins as you shout, "Go, McNugget!" (Mc.Nugget is none other than your lvl 98 torchic). You quickly break out your pokedex, which info

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Physics and biology collide

So. I was reading my Biology textbook the other day and encountered something called "water potential." A simple summary of this term is water's potential energy , or it's capacity to perform work when free water moves from high water potential to low water potential. What? Physics in biology you say? Of course! :eagerness: Physics is everywhere. Let's define water potential in depth. Water potential is given by the equation water potential (symbol = Greek letter psi) = potential due to solu

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Cows, cars and calipers

I'll set the scene: It's a dark night and the fog is thick as soup. You drive along in your pink jeep, hoping to get home in time for dinner (your favorite!), when a white mass appears in the road. A COW!:eek: You thrust the break pedal to the ground, and your wrangler just stops short of the bovine J-walker. What is the only thing that came between you and a pile of ground beef? Physics is the hero of this story-- specifically friction. A car's breaking system is usually one of t

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Fempto Photography Captures Light in Motion

So far, no other particle has been able to move at the speed of light. However, human beings are capable of seeing light move. Ramesh Raskar and his team at MIT have developed a camera capable of capturing light at 1 trillion frames per second. This method, called fempto photography, can take slow motion videos of light in motion. Watch the video for a better explanation but for those of you in a rush below is a summary of MIT's amazing research. As shown in the video, Raskar uses a laser to

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

The Physics of Santa and His Reindeer

Credit to Mr. Powlin (who read this last year about the same time) and Snopes.com, where I found this humorous commentary once again. For those of you who did not hear this last Christmas or those who want to get into the spirit of the physics-filled holiday season, I thought I'd post this up for a few giggles. Happy Holidays, all! :snowman: No known species of reindeer can fly. BUT there are 300,000species of living organisms yet to be classified, and while most of these areinsects and germs

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Magnetism Fullerton VS Lewin

After watching all of Walter Lewin's videos as well as Mr. Fullerton's, I've come to the conclusion that Mr. Fullerton's videos are more straightforward and earlier to understand that Lewin's. For those of you who swear Lewin isn't speaking English, here's a summary of the video content. I will be listing content in order of the A Plus Phys. video titles, so that if anyone needs elaboration they can refer to the corresponding video. :star: If even that doesn't work, the textbook & practice p

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Happy New Year!

HAPPY NEW (school) YEAR EVERYBODY!!! I'm super excited for some serious Physics C. Just set up my account! I found this comic online and thought it would be a great way to break the ice: Hee hee. And of course I'll site my oh-so-credible source: http://memebase.cheezburger.com ...Although they did spell cheeseburger wrong. ^-^; And look, I found a fencing smiley face!:fight) --Geek out!

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Question: drag coefficient

How would I determine the drag coefficient of an organic shape, such as a blob of pudding or a chicken or a Looney Tunes character? I wanted to do a blog post on the terminal velocity of Wile E. Coyote falling off of a cliff. I went back into my notes and found the following equations: Air resistance = Fdrag = bv = cv2 VT= (mg)/b V = VT ( 1 - e(-b/m) ) Notice the constants, b and c. I turned to google, thinking that the constants would be relatively easy to find. It turns out, the

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

Trampolines, Energy and Foxes (Oh my!)

Have you ever wondered how trampolines work? Anything fun or worthwhile has physics behind it, so let’s take a peek at the gymnast’s best friend: [ATTACH=CONFIG]497[/ATTACH] I hope you all enjoy my art skills. Read it and weep. :victorious: The magic behind a trampoline can be explained in terms of energy. Let’s say that a child is bouncing up and down on the trampoline. When the child is at a maximum height, his/her potential energy due to gravity is at a maximum. Because PE= mgh, wit

AlphaGeek

AlphaGeek

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