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rtsully829

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About rtsully829

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  • Birthday 08/29/1995
  1. Black holes are really cool to learn about, thank you!
  2. I didn't know there where so many forces at work.
  3. rtsully829

    Time Travel

    I'm sure you have heard about, read about it book and even seen it in movies. Well I am hear to give you a basic overview, it is very complicated once you really look into it. I'm hear to shed light onto this for all of you. (All with out the use of a flux capacitor or a Delorean.) I'm going to talk about the types into the future or into the past. Lets start with the future. In some ways this is on display everyday. The clocks on the GPS satellites need to be adjusted due to fact that when you are moving time moves slower thus you age slower. In theory, you could send someone out into orbit for say 20 years, he would only age 20 year when family member and friends on earth would age 30 or 40 years. And the faster you move the slower time would move but you would run into the problem that the faster you move the more massive you become. Something I think that cool about time travel into the past is in some ways we see it all the time too, ever night to be exact. When you look at a star, your not seeing how it looks now, you seeing how it look 100, 200, even 1000 years ago. Now don't be worried, I know you though it would be slightly more interesting and let me try my best to make it so. Einstein's law of causality does kind of put a damper on the idea that you could step in a machine and just go back due to, in simple terms, cause and effect. Everything happens causing something else and something else to happen and we can't upset that. Now don't give up your dreams just yet. some physicist do theorize that if we could push past light speed time could flow backwards. Well there it is in a few minutes, time travel. Now to fully understand the science and theory behind it you would need to read a book and be much smarter than me. It is something very cool to think about. Stephen Hawking as talked about the idea of time traveling tourist if you want to look into that. But to save you the time. But if someone knocks on your door claiming to be your great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great-great grandson, maybe you should listen.
  4. i didn't know there was so much physics in nasacar!
  5. i really like need for speed good job
  6. Do you really want to believe in Santa and the magic of Christmas again? Let me see if I can help your here. Maybe using physics we can make out dreams come back to life. Lets start with just talking about how many presents he would need to deliver. There are roughly 2 billion kids in the world, taking out all the non-Christian kids, that leaves around 378 million children give or take. Now taking the average of 3.5 kids per household, this leaves us with 91.8 million household he must get to in 31 hours (thanks to time zones.) I think the first thing we need to look at is the weight of the sled. Lets just say every kid gets just 1, 1 kilogram present. That's 378 million kilograms on his sleigh. To get going he would need to move at around 2,800 kilometer per second, roughly 1/100th the speed of light. Also every time he stopped he would need the energy equal to the amount found in a small star. There are other factor to think about too. There is the fact that he is moving so fast that he would burn up and the amount of energy he is exerting would vaporize him and his reindeer. On top of that he only has about 1/100th of second to stop at each house. Some more things are explained here: Now, with all these numbers it does appear that if Santa did attempt to deliver present he died. But I want to believe. Whose say that with all the undiscovered species on this planet whose to say there isn't an unknown species of flying reindeer. Or maybe Santa is a physics genius and has technology far beyond us and has gotten pasted of all these problems. All you got to do is believe.
  7. But its cooler if you hear sounds
  8. I didn't know how much physics into ghost hunting
  9. So, we all know bubbles are awesome. But have you ever stopped and thought on why they act how they act or even how they are made, well believe or not it has a lot to do with physics. It all starts with the surface tension. The surface tension is 75 dyne/cm and 25o C, just a fancy way of saying how much pressure it takes to break the surface of water. When you add soap it increases the surface tension. When the surface tension is high the fluid is able to drain out and the bubble is formed with a membrane thinner than a human hair. http://t0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcSIn7Vy-cXBJBiH1QJftIh8y3MIBBC288zATy4Bwtc-pf9NBLIcvg This can all be explained by Laplace law, P=T/R or pressure is equal to tension in the wall divide by radius. This is better explained in this video by Julius summers Bubble seems really simple and childish but there has been lots of research into this topic. Professors have researched them and wrote paper and matter of fact the LA times wrote an article on them. It is actually complex stuff that is complicated to explain I hope I got you to look at them a little different LA Times http://articles.latimes.com/2013/may/11/science/la-sci-bubbles-20130511
  10. Maybe flash is a master of physics and speed?
  11. If you like me, you want your own personal Lightsaber. They come in handy for so many things, self-defense, chopping food, and cutting through metal, not to mention the portability. Let’s dive in and see if we can really make these available to the home consumer. Now and important thing to remember is that no two lightsaber are exactly alike, they are custom made for by Jedi and Sith. But all share a common characteristic. They have some sort of main power crystal along with along with stabilizing crystals and a stabling emitter system. The power normally come from a diatium power crystal. Once that is all in place the emitter system stabilizes the plasma and saber appears . Unfortunately, for those of you who think they can make their own and save a few bucks, there is a catch. If you are basing this on the assumption they use plasma, it would become so hot, up to around 5200 Kelvin (8900F). You would also need so sort of way power the light saber. Something in the order of MEGA-watts. Something much larger than the handle. And possibly the final nail in its coffin is the inability to control plasma, you would need magnet around it to make sure the plasma didn't change shape. And if you to base this on lightsaber being laser, you run into the problem that lasers don't stop, there would have to be something on the end to cap it. Even worse, lightsabers would just pass through one another. But don't worry, I am not saying that lightsaber couldn't be made; we just don't have the technology yet. But don't worry, there is a hope yet. Plasma is made by bringing gases up to high energy levels. The more energy you put in, the better quality plasma due to the fact that more atoms will be stripped of electrons. You could make plasma by producing a high enough voltage difference. So keep your dreams up, one day you may have your lightsaber, still then, keep dreaming. Dr.Michio Kaku show on lightsabers, 1st of 3 parts.
  12. I never would have thought air resitance would play that big of a part in falling objects. Cool entry!
  13. It must be really hard to do enough work to be able to spin and flip in the air.
  14. Ever since 7th grade, running has been a part of life, and just now it as occurred to me, I have no idea how it works, obviously its putting one foot in front of another, but why does this happen? let’s take a look. To start think of you arms and legs as pendulums. The equation for a pendulum is d2o/dt2+g/l=0. In this L is length meaning if you shorten your pendulum or legs in this case you will go faster. You probably do this when you run without noticing it. Do you every run with a straight leg no, you bend them, thus you shorten the pendulum. Now this put your arm down to your side, straight. try swinging back and forth, not very easy or fast. No put your arm at a 90o angle and swing, easier right? This is because you made you pendulum shorter. There is other ways to get physics to work for while you run. When you lean back you push against gravity and are being slowed down, to make a sprint or kick at the end of you race easier simply lean (at the ankles, not the waist) and let gravity pull you, you will go faster with putting in more work. It is also important to know the forces involved in running. The first one is Newton's action reaction law. For ever action there is an equal and opposite reaction. This is shown in this diagram, When you push down off the track the track is doing the same towards you and applies a force in direction of you center of mass. This means the more force you push down with the more will be exerted on your body. The force from the track or running surface causes a shockwave up your leg. This tend to the root of many overuse injuries in running such as shin splint and why all runners should invest in good shoes to help lessen the shockwave. To see a video of this click the link below. The final and most important part of running is stride length. This is what gives you your power. (P=w/t) This is why it is important to regulate stride length. Too long of strides and will put in too much power to hold over a long period of time, too little stride and you won't have the power to get the speed you need. This is because the Work=Fd and to have enough power you need more work in a short period of time thus supporting the why stride rate is so important to running. I hope you enjoyed this as much as I did researching it and maybe you will be just a little faster because of this. Don't forget to come out and support the IHS track team April 24 and 30 at home on the track and see some of this in action! .
  15. Hello, I am Ryan. I was born in Long Island, New York. I do cross country and track and play a little baseball. I am a Boy Scout and love being outside. I also enjoy being a Buffalo Bills season ticket holder and love the Yankees. I am taking Physics so I can keep learning new things all the way up through senior year!

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