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Determining g Lab Deliverable

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Guest AlexisRichey1

Four students at IHS have discovered a very new way to find acceleration due to gravity. Heres how they said they did it; "First, we measured @ meters with a tape measure and dropped a ball from the top while timing the time for it to hit the ground. Then, we took the average of the three trials and found acceleration using the formula D=Vit+1/2at squared. We got 7.4 meters per second per second. The We calculated percent error and got only 24% error. "

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Guest XxcountryxX

The percent error was so high because of the incapability of the stopwatch to be as accurate as needed for the experiment. Also, the percent error was based off a piece of equipment that was not precise or efficient enough for the type of experiment. The experiment could be redesigned for the optimum accuracy if there was a photogate located at ground level, where people’s feet are. Also, the photogate would be very accurate because it has more precise variables because it has state of the art technology that lets it know exactly when the laser is broken then reformed, which gives a very accurate time in the air. This would increase the exactness by a lot. You could follow the same experiment just using the photogate and internet technology instead of the stopwatch.

From dexter627

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Guest Blitzer720

Young physicists, Dylan, Ryan, Jake, and Zack found the acceleration due to gravity through a couple of lengthly tests. At first, the students became so intrigued with the materials used in the lab, such as the dodgeball and meter stick, that they couldn't focus enough to get the job done. But after regrouping and getting serious, they soon found the tests became easy, and the knowledge became clear. At first, the students placed the dodgeball above the 2 meter stick and dropped it, recording the time it took in seconds to reach the ground. With this information, they used the kinematic equation d=vit + 1/2at^2 to find out that the acceleration due to gravity was 13.22 meters per second square. By than using the percent error equation, they found that there was 34.6% error, which determined the tests results wern't very accurate. But the physicists were determined to succeed, and carried on their experiment. They moved onto Method A, where each jumper was timed for how long they were in the air. The average for everyones jumps turned out to be .72 seconds in the air, a feat that even there own grandmothers could accomplish. But the data didnt discourage them, they continued onto find the maximum displacement, which was the .72 seconds split in half, making it .36 seconds. Upon finding the max displacement, they ventured into Method B, where each persons change in reach was measured. Once completing this method, the average change came out to be .45 m difference, solidifiying the thought that they had no "hops". But they shrugged off the test, and compared both the average max height by Method A with the average max height determined by Method B. To get the max height from Method A, they used the formula d=vit + 1/2at^2 to find that it resulted in .64 m rather than .45 m. Though each member was excited with the .64 m, they conducted a percent error on the tests, and discovered that they were 42.2% error. Though there tests wern't at all accurate, they were able to work togather throughout the experiment, find out there error, and became better physicists by the time the bell ringed at the end of class.

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Guest erockest3

Students Make History

Today 4 student have made history. They have correctly calculated the acceleration due to gravity, g, in a novel manner. The goal was to calculate the acceleration of a ball as it is dropped from rest from approximately 2 meters high. The students first started by measuring out 2 meters so they new exactly where to drop the ball from. Next the students used a stopwatch and a foam ball to measures the amount of time it took for the ball to travel 2 meters. the students conducted 3 trials, there data came back as .71 sec for trial 1, .64 sec for trial 2, and .67 sec for trial 3, leaving there average time at about .67 sec. After that the student used the equation "d=vi(t)+1/2at^2" using the distance, initial velocity, and average time to calculate the acceleration. Seeing as their percent error was about 9.2% there were many mistakes made that made their answer not as exact as it could have been. Also due to the unadvanced materials, it can be hard to calculate this type of data and be exact.

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Guest XxcountryxX

The method we used in class had such a high percent error because the equipment we used was not accurate enough . By using the stop watch we were unable to get the most accurate reading of time therefore our calculations were off and our experiment was not as p78999 as it could have been. If I redesigned this experiment I would have used a photgate to catch the movement instead of a stop watch.

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Guest strawberry

Three amazing students at Irondequoit High School have made a break through in the study of physics: By only using a stopwatch, a measuring tape, and a ball, the acceleration due to gravity has been calculated in a new and scientific way. Students measured the height from the floor of the classroom to the top of the ceiling with a measuring tape, and got 2.75 Meters. Holding the ball at the top of the ceiling, the three students dropped the ball and started the stopwatch at the same time. They measured that the time the ball took to hit the bottom of the floor was .64 seconds. Also, the initial velocity of the ball was 0 m/s because any object dropped starts with an initial velocity of 0. Using this information, the students calculated for the acceleration to see if it really is 9.81 m/s2 . The Formula : d= viT+ (1/2)(a)(t^2) was taken to figure it out. with the information they had, the converted formula became: 2(2.75 m)/ (.64s)^2 = A . The answer obtained was 13.4m/s^2. Obviously it is not the real accepted value of 9.81, so they had to calculate percent error also. using the formula: (accepted value - actual value)/(accepted value) X100, the answer came out to be that there was a 36.6% error in their experiments. Faults in the experiment were being able to time the stop watch precisley, and measuring an accurate distance from where the ball was dropped , to the ground. Overall, the students at Irondequoit High School have created astounding breakthroughs in calculating acceleration due to gravity.

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Guest crazyskittles

Recently, at Irondequoit High School, Physics students attempted to find the variable g, or the acceleration due to gravity. Students did this by dropping a ball from two meters above the ground, and using a stopwatch to time how long it took for the ball to hit the floor. They used three trials, in the first trial it took the ball .52 seconds to hit the floor, the second time it took .48 seconds, and in the final trial it took .35 seconds. Using the average of these times, .45 seconds, and the kinematic equation d=(vi)(t)+(.5)(a)(t^2), the students found the acceleration due to gravity to be 19.75 meters per second. However, the accepted value of acceleration due to gravity is 9.81 meters per second, and therefore this group of students found that they had a percent error of 101.3. This was most likely due to the variations in the measured times, because such a wide range doesn't lend itself to very accurate calculations.

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Guest sarah23

It appears that young physicists at Irondequoit High School have managed to calculate the acceleration due to gravity. They accomplished this by using their kinematic equations and just a tape measure, stopwatch, and ball.

First, they did three trials measuring how long it took to drop a ball from the top of a two-meter stick to the ground. They then found the average of those times and used that measure as t to plug into one of their kinematic equations, Vit+ ½ a ^2. They found the acceleration due to gravity to be 8.65 m/s^2. Their accuracy might have been slightly off because it’s difficult to get the exact time using a stopwatch, but the percent error was only 11%. Overall, these physicists did a great job at finding the acceleration due to gravity, g.

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Guest smunger

Breaking News at WEST Irondequoit high school, High school senior Skylar Munger have calculated the acceleration due to gravity. By using only a ball, metre stick and stop watch I found the force of Gravity. Using kinematic Equations I found the acceleration of gravity to be 8.6 m/s/s ( a=2d/t squared). Gravity was found to be 8.6 m/s/s in Irondequoit, either there is less gravity here or my present era was 9% because the accepted value of gravity is 9.81m/s/s.

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Guest russ1234

The lab determining maximum height had a lot of potential for error which resulted in many high percentages. First, a lot of error occurred in timing someone's jump in the air. If another lab member timed them, they didn’t know exactly when the start and stop the stopwatch since they aren't in the jumper's brain and don’t know when they are going to take off or land. If the jumper timed themselves, their reflexes weren't always precise so the exact time they started their jump was not the exact time they pressed the stopwatch to start and same goes for stopping, too. Secondly, error could have occurred when measuring the distance of the jump with tape. This could occur if the tape was not placed at the end of the person's fingers, and therefore, it would not have been placed at the right spot on the wall. Additionally, if the measurement with the ruler of the height between the two tapes was wrong, it would lead to a greater chance of error. A way to reduce the high percentage of error would be if there were a scale that when a person jumped, it would start timing them because of the lack of weight on it but when they landed, the timer stopped. This would provide an accurate reading of how long the person was in the air so they could then calculate the distance they are able to jump.

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Guest D-Roc

Determing g:News Article

Attention: The young physicist of IHS have discovered acceleration due to gravity using the kinematic equations.The physicist used a meter stick,stopwatch and a basketball to acquire their data with three trials of dropping the basketball from the high of the meter stick.Knowing that the height at which the ball was dropped was 2 meters ,and also knowing it was drop so the initial velocity was zero they just had to get an average time. the first trial was timed at being .7 seconds,followed by .67 seconds and lastly .69 seconds. The average time was calculated to be .68 seconds.Next the students applied knowledge of kinematic equations to decide the equation d= vit+1/2at^2(with adjustment)nwould be the best fit to discover the acceleration of gravity. The result was 8.65 meter per second per second . Finally the physicist used their answer to get the percent error, they did this by subtracting the accepted value from their own and dividing that by the accepted value. the percent error ended up being 11%. Besides human error everything seemed correct ,Good Job Irondequoit High School physicists.

Determing Maximum Height

NEW!NEW!NEW! A vertical height testing for those trying to get the most out of theirHigh Jump for TRACK & FIELD!!!

Proven and tested to get the maximum height in every hop,skip and jump. The process was recently tested during a lab for a regents physics class at Irondequoit Highschool. In order to get accurate results you must do at least three trials of jumping as high as you can as someone times your time off the ground,Our participants had .51 seconds for the first trial,then .72 seconds then finished at .30 seconds. Then after getting and average of .255 seconds we used our handy kinematic equation of d=vit+1/2at^2 to determine a distance or displacements 319 meters.Then with a simple ruler the participant jumps three times and gets 30 centimeters first, then 34 centimeters and lastly 38 cnetimeters with an average of 34 centimeters.Then to check accuracy we used the value of the second method from the first then divided by the 2nd methods average for an error pf 6.2%

The Method is proven to be accurate and a sure way to improve your high jump in the upcoming track seasons.

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Guest dexter627

Young physicists from Irondequoit High School just discovered the acceleration due to gravity! The instruments used in their experiment were: a ball, a stopwatch, and a tape measure. To begin, they measured a specific height and used that same height as a constant in all their other trials. The plan was to drop the ball from the height determined and time, using the stopwatch, how long it takes for acceleration due to gravity to make the ball hit the ground. The physicists attempted three times and calculated the average time it took for the ball to hit the ground. Next they were able to calculate acceleration due to gravity on Earth, by plugging in the information they had, time (.81s), distance (2m), and initial velocity (0 m/s because it is a free fall). Then they used the Kinematic Equation: d = vit + (1/2)a(t)^2, which is simplified into a = ((2d)/(t)^2)). They then substituted with units and found the answer for acceleration due to gravity to be 6.1 m/(s)^2. Overall the accuracy of the measurements were not nearly as precise as needed for official scientific data because the stopwatches rely on human reflexes which differs from trial to trial, therefore experimental error is greater than 25% but less than 35%, at a 31.5% error. Tune in again to hear breaking news in the physics world! Until next time, remember, gravity is the downer!

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Guest Bob Enright

Breaking News

Today at Irondequoit high school a groundbreaking discovery was made. Four regent’s physics students discovered a new method of discovering the acceleration of an object due to gravity. Using only a stop watch, a tape measure, and a ball the students calculated the time it took for the ball to fall from the surface of the lab table. After multiple trials it was discovered that it took the ball approximately .28 seconds to reach the ground. Then the equation d=vi x t + ½ a t^2 which was then converted to a= 2(d-Vi x t) / t^2. After plugging their numbers into the equation they discovered that the acceleration was 22.32m/s^2. This is obviously much greater than the previously calculated values of acceleration proving that there was a high percent of error over 130%. The calculations or collected numbers must have been off.

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Guest Bob Enright

After making our final calculations for this lab it is obvious that there are high levels of error throughout the lab ultimately adding up to over 130%. To help reduce this high percentage of error it may prove to be effective to attempt new methods of collecting the data. New procedures such as using new timing methods other than stop watches because of the different reaction times of those conducting the lab.

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Guest li'l beethoven

Last week at Irondequoit High Schoo, Regents Physics classes created groundbreaking news in their kinematics and gravity labs! They calculated the acceleration due to gravity, otherwise known as g. To do this, they dropped a ball from a pre-determined height and with a stopwatch, measured the time it took for the ball to hit the ground. Then, they used their kinematics chart and equations to determine g. One group's chart and equation looked as follows:

vi=0 m/s

vf=

d=2m

t=0.68s

a=?

Using the equation d=vit+0.5at^2 and solving for acceleration, this group determined the acceleration due to gravity to be 8.65 m/s^2, with only 11% error! Just goes to show that exciting scientific discoveries aren't just made by scientists!

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Physics students in IHS have figured out how to calculate acceleration due to gravity! The young physicists dropped a ball from a set height and they timed how long it took for it to reach the ground. Then later used their kinematic equations to solve for (a) or acceleration. The average time the ball was in the air was .53 seconds, and their hieght they dropped the ball from was 2 meters. Students found gravity to have an acceleration of 14.2m/s^2. They found their percent error to be 44.8% so their data was not completly accurate.

Edited by jaygilbert

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Young physicists at Irondequoit High School have calcuated the acceleration due to gravity. They used kinematic equations to determine the acceleration due to gravitty using a tape measure, a ball and a stop watch. During the first method, the students measured how long the jumper was in the air with a stop watch. The students took three trials and found the average in seconds. Then, they used their kinematic equations to find the displacement. With these two particular students, using the stop watch their displacement calculated out to be .36cm and .22cm. During the next method, the students needed to measure the change in their reach using a tape measure or a meter stick. The students stuck tape on the wall, jumped three times, and calculated the difference using a meter stick. With these two particular students, the distance the jumped calculated to be 33cm, and 40cm. Using percent error, which is your value, minues the accepted value divided by the accepted value, all multiplied by 100, the students concluded that one had a 9.1% percent error and the other had a 45% percent error. Although one student had more error than the other, they both were successful determining different ways to calculate acceleration.

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Recently students in Mr. Fullerton's regents physics class have taken up an important task, calculating the acceleration due to gravity on the surface of the earth. This question was answered in a simple manner, by dropping balls on the English classes below them. The known and accepted answer by the scientific community is 9.91 meters per second square, but did these students get that answer? The answer was not exactly that. From two students tests Ben and Gerrard the calculated value was 11 meters a second square. With a 12 percent error this may be the best these students could do with the equipment available. In the future perhaps their will be a better way for high school students to calculate this important figure but for now we will have to accept what we can get. Hopefully it was worth interrupting English classes below but that’s a story for another day.

By Ben Steiner and Gerrard Caso

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This method had such a high percent error because attempting to time the exact moment when someone jumps off the ground and lands on the ground using a stop watch is very inaccurate. The person timing the person in the air will not know the exact moment of when the person jumps up and when their feet hit the ground. A more modern or state of the art version of this expriment can be created by using censors to measure the exact time the person is in the air. There could be a censor anywhere on the body where it would be constant, then the other person could set up a seperate censor to measure the person jumping. This censor could be hooked up to a computer or something that would show the exact time. That way, the timer would be more accurate because there wouldnt be another person trying to time the jumper.

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Determining g Lab Deliverable- Maddy, Remo, and Paul.

Breaking News! Young physics students at Irondequoit High School have recently calculated the acceleration due to gravity! To do this, they conducted an exeriment which included dropping a ball and seeing how long it took for it to go a certian diatance. What they did was measure 5.2 meters up from the ground and then took a ball and dropped it. In addition to this, they timed how long it took for the ball to reach the ground. The students did this a series of three times to get more accurate measurements. After that, they used the formula d=vit+1/2at^2 to find the accereration. After plugging in all of their date (with units of course) they concluded that the acceleration due to gravity was 9.94 which is very close to the accepted value of 9.81.

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This just in! The newest minds to the physiccs world have discovered the acceleration of GRAVITY! I know, it is exciting! We are pretty proud of them too. I hear that these three glamourous phycisists, Lia Rossi, Lexi Sammler, and Riley Eike, have discovered the acceleration through a ball drop experiment. They started off by measuring the height of the celing, where they dropped the ball, than they timed the dropping of the ball from the highest point to the floor. After preforming these tasks three times in a row and averaging their times, these genius's pulled out their kinematics equations and plugged in their information to the equation d=vit+1/2at^2! Their final answer of a=10.99 only had a 12% error! This takes some serious skill! We should all learn from these terrific scientists and strive to make our accomplisments as significant as theirs!

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Breaking News: Irondequoit High School students calculate their own acceleration due to gravity

Today in Dan Fullerton’s physics class, ninth period students calculated their own acceleration due to gravity. Surprisingly, with the instruments they used, Daniel, Rebecca and Christina calculated their acceleration due to gravity to be only 10.4 meters per second^2. One would think their calculations would be totally wrong but they were actually very close being that the actual accepted acceleration due to gravity is 9.81 meters per second^2 making them only six percent off when it comes to their percent error. More breaking news from the excellent students at Irondequoit High School in Dan Fullerton’s Physics class coming quickly as is expected from these bright young minds.

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