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AnnieB

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  1. AnnieB

    Physics of sleeping

    It is quite interesting how physics can be found in such random parts of your daily life. One such example of this is sleeping. When a person sleeps, they are exerting a force on the bed that they are sleeping on. According to Newton's Third Law, the bed then exerts that same force back on to the person sleeping. In addition to this, gravity holds the person down to the bed, keeping them grounded. When I need to wake up in the morning, I set an alarm on my phone and put my ringer on high. This way, the high frequency pierces through my sleep, and wakes me up. I have never realized just how much physics is in such a simple act!
  2. AnnieB

    The Doppler Effect

    The other night I was sitting at my kitchen counter when I heard the wailing of sirens coming from off in the distance. The frequency and amplitude of the sirens was quiet at first because the emergency vehicles were so far away. However, the sound grew increasingly louder and louder and within the next minute, an ambulance sped past my house. As the sound of the ambulance died out, I heard more sirens coming. Just like the ambulance, the frequency and amplitude of the siren was quiet at first, but as the fire truck came closer and closer to my house the sound was growing louder and louder. The sound of the sirens hit their peak when they were passing by directly in front of my house. However, the frequency and amplitude was only at its peak for a moment for the vehicles kept moving and the sound was receding, its frequency and amplitude getting quieter and quieter once again. This process is called the Doppler Effect! I couldn't believe it! I had coincidentally learned about the Doppler Effect that night and I now understood what Mr. Fullerton meant when he would say "Doppler Effect" every time we heard sirens outside the classroom window.
  3. AnnieB

    Waves on the beach

    Over spring break, my family and I traveled to Florida to get away from the cold weather. We went to Singer Island, off the coast of West Palm. It was a beautiful place and the day we arrived we could not wait to get to the beach. When we arrived at our hotel it was around 5pm. High tide was in full swing. My sisters and I went out to the beach and could not believe how big the waves were! I had been to Florida numerous times before, but I have never experienced such big waves before! I naturally thought of physics class for we were learning about waves! It was funny to think that these were literal waves produced by the water's current, but there were also sound waves emitting through the air from the waves crashing on the sand. The water waves could be considered transverse for they were moving perpendicular to the beach. The sound produced by the waves crashing on the sound is classified as mechanical waves. Its incredible what physics helps me understanding in real life!
  4. Anyone who knows me knows that I am unfortunately, rather clumsy. My coaches and teammates joke all of the time about it with me because it seems like every time I am the one on the ground. I really cannot help it though! Gravity really just seems to like me so much that it pulls me down every time! Last week in my lacrosse game against PalMac I found gravity once again summoning me. This time however, my falling was not due to my clumsiness (it was quite shocking) but rather a calf cramp that hit me mid stride. I was sprinting down the field when all of a sudden my calf cramped up and there was nothing I could do but let gravity pull me down. It was extremely painful and I fell to the ground right away. I can always count on gravity to have my back! It is truly incredible how much physics applies to every day life! The physics of falling however is not exactly my favorite and I would really prefer if gravity did not like pulling on me so much.
  5. AnnieB

    My sister's scream

    My younger sister Ella is someone who tends to throw a fit when she does not get what she wants. These fits occur on a daily basis but the other day when she began screaming about me not letting her stay home by herself, I began thinking about the physics in her scream. In class we are learning about the different types of waves and how they travel. We are also learning about wave frequency and amplitude and how that affects sound waves. Ella's screaming tends to be extremely loud. She really likes to get the point across that she is not happy and does not agree with me. When Ella screams, her voice resonates at a high frequency. The high frequency is a result of her voice being so high pitched. If Ella spoke in a quiet, gentle voice (the way I would rather she express how she is feeling) the sound frequency would be much lower. If one were to graph Ella's scream, we would see that her scream results in a high amplitude as well for the louder the sound, the higher the amplitude.
  6. AnnieB

    physics at work

    Wow that is really cool! I enjoy watching hockey and have never thought about the physics that is incorporated!
  7. That was a clever application to physics! I am sorry to hear about your head though, hope it feels better by now!
  8. I wanted to take the time to reflect on the past semester and I was thinking and I have realized my favorite unit in physics this year so far has definitely been the work and power unit. I find myself to be very comfortable with the work and power equations and understanding how to solve problems with them. What I thought really helped were the videos where we solved the problems using the crossfit people and their situations. Being able to see how physics appears in real life I have found helps me get a better grasp of what is being taught. I feel good about the work and power unit and the problems I have done prepping for it which going into the midterm is a nice feeling to have.
  9. Winter time holds the potential to be a very dangerous season if it was not for friction. Ice and snow pose as threats to deter friction from doing its job. However, without friction, the roads would be filled with accidents and it would be nearly impossible to walk on the ground without slipping. During the winter, some people get special tires that have better traction on the slippery ground. The traction on the tires helps produce more friction so the car does not slide as easily. People have special chains they can put on shoes as well that create traction and increase the friction between their shoes and the icy ground. I have special chains that go on my running shoes so that I can run in the winter without worrying about slipping around and slowing myself down. Friction is also important while merely walking on the icy ground. That is why many put salt on the ground, to try and help with the friction. As one can see, physics truly has many uses, including keeping us safe!
  10. AnnieB

    Physics of driving

    When driving a car, one can find numerous examples of physics. One component of physics that drivers must be extremely careful of is centripetal force and the power of centripetal acceleration. During this time of year, roads are extremely slippery and often times people do not realize how fast they are going until they are trying to slow down and are skidding on black ice. On St. Paul Boulevard, there is a curve that is especially precarious to drive along during the winter time. My driving instructor has warned me many times that I must take the curve slowly and carefully for not only are 4 lanes crammed on that bend, but it gets slippery as well. My instructor explained to me that if I go too fast centripetal force could cause me to curve out of my lane and into oncoming traffic which would most definitely lead to an accident.
  11. AnnieB

    Physics in running

    As Mr. Fullerton says, and as I have mentioned before, physics can be found in virtually every activity we partake in. Running is one such activity that one can find components of physics if they look for them. I enjoy running but I have never taken the time to consider the physics within it, until now. For one, Newton's laws can be found in running. Newton's Second Law is proved through running for as I move my legs faster, push off the ground harder, taking longer strides, I find myself able to accelerate and run at a much quicker pace. According to Newton, it is the force exerted that causes a change in velocity. Hence, why me exerting more force or pushing off the ground harder and moving my legs faster results in me being able to run faster. This is very beneficial to know for when I am running while playing sports, I know how to make my body work to accelerate more quickly. Newton's Third Law can also be found in running for as I run, the pavement is acting upon my feet with the same force my feet are acting upon the pavement. It is interesting to think about how objects we touch, even if they are small, act on us with the same force we act upon them with.
  12. Wow, you put a lot of thought and effort into this! It is really cool to see your thought process behind your work!
  13. This is a really useful tool! Smart study strategy Jess!
  14. Wow, really cool video Elena! I never thought of how many cartoons defy the laws of physics until now!
  15. There is a great deal of physics in working out. For one, lifting weights themselves have numerous components of physics that contribute to the process. For example, when I do squats on the gym, I can find the magnitude of work I am doing on the weights by using the equation w= Fd. This is work equals force multiplied by distance. I can find the force I am exerting on the bar by figuring out the bars mass and multiplying that by the gravitational pull on the bar, 9.81 m/s^2. I then multiply this number by the distance I cover in one up and down motion. From here, I can determine the power I am exerting on the bar. The power equation is P= w/ t or P= fd/ t. To find the power I am exerting in the squats, I divide the amount of work done by the time in seconds I do a single squat in. As one can see, there are many ways physics can appear in every day life.

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