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  1. baseball00
    Latest Entry

    Water and ice molecules on earth have a distinct molecular structure that gives it the properties that it has; however, under different surrounding pressures, the molecular structure can change, resulting in the formation of superionic water. Superionic water differs from the ice/water you and I know so well. "Regular" ice has molecules that form a V shape with two hydrogen atoms and one oxygen atom. As pressure increases, these atoms get squeezed into different shapes. A property that superionic ice has is that it is a conductor of electricity; however, unlike most conductors, the current is carried by positively charged ions instead of negatively charged electrons.

    This substance was just a theoretical idea until recently when the University of Rochester's OMEGA laser tested the theory and was successful in creating superionic ice. They knew this was a success because the molecules were able to conduct electricity. Due to the opaque color of the molecules when electricity was ran through it, it was determined that it was, in fact superionic. If it had a shiny look to it, the researchers would have known that it couldn't of been superinoinc because that would mean that negative electrons were carrying the current.

    The pressures that were applied to the ice by the laser were almost 2 million times the atmospheric pressure of earth. This is the amount of pressure that planets Neptune and Uranus have.

  2. Time for a little mental health rant…

    We all want our children to be the best they can be, to feel good about themselves, and to reach their potential. Part of this process, however, involves learning to fail productively — understanding and experiencing what it’s like to fall short, knowing that sick feeling in your gut is uncomfortable but necessary, and disliking that feeling enough to do something about it and try again.

    I sure hope I’m wrong, but I feel like many of the changes I’m seeing in the way we as a society deal with children is sending the wrong message. These changes are made with the best of intentions — we don’t want anyone to feel left out, and we don’t want children to experience the pain of failure — but we as adults who know better need to recognize that these uncomfortable experiences are important to building up confidence, self esteem, and independence. Kudos that aren’t truly earned don’t teach a child to work hard, they teach a child that showing up is enough.

    I’m not saying little ones need to be beaten into submission, or that I should always crush my kid in a game of Connect Four — but I do think they need to learn that they can’t win every time, otherwise there’s no impetus to improve. They won’t always get picked first to be on a team, there will be days when they are left out of activities their friends get to experience, and there will be events when they’ll leave the field and not be the winner of the event. This is OK, it’s an opportunity learn the importance of giving your all, of preparing as fully as possible, and the value of sportsmanship, both on top and at the bottom of the podium.

    I think it’s also important for our kids to understand what makes us proud and what is disappointing. Sportsmanship is important, but it’s also important to realize that decisions leading up to events contribute to the success or failure of that event. As a teacher I observe students who work their tail off and struggle for a middling grade… and I try to instill a sense of pride in that work and that grade. I also have students who slack off and are naturally talented enough to earn A’s. I try to explain to these students that they are not reaching their potential, and I don’t find that acceptable. There will be times when our kids may try and try and try, but never reach the level of success that they desire. Recently I’ve dealt with repeated instances of academic dishonesty, from students who are taking shortcuts in their classes, and aren’t recognizing the connection between their integrity, work ethic, and results.

    True self esteem and confidence comes from understanding that you can go to bed every night with no regrets, having given your all, not from an external source such as a trophy or a piece of paper with a letter on it. And not meeting every goal just tells you that you’ve set aggressive goals. If you reach every one of your goals, you’re not reaching high enough.

    I don’t think it’s valuable to get into specifics, as you can find “opportunity for improvement” in so many of the things we do and say with our kids, from the toddlers to the older young-at-heart — in our homes, in our schools, and in our activities. But I would ask, if some of this does resonate with you, to take a step back and look at what changes you can make, or ways you can support and reinforce those who are instilling these old-fashioned values. And don’t be afraid to speak up every now and then and question what you see occurring.

    Just because someone thinks it’ll make everyone feel better, doesn’t mean it’s a good idea. And just like our mothers taught us, popular opinion doesn’t mean it’s the right opinion. Remember the old adage “if all your friends jumped off a bridge would you jump off too?” It’s time for all of us to start thinking for ourselves.

    The post Failure is Necessary for Growth appeared first on Physics In Flux.

    QBw1gInz-Pk

  3. MyloXyloto
    Latest Entry

    Last weekend at an honors interview at Roberts, I got to take a look in some of their physics labs.  they had some fun things set up for us to check out.  One thing was in a section called "physics and music".  Sounds perfect for me, right? They had a bunch of wine glasses filled with different amounts of water.  When you dipped your finger in some water and rubbed it around the edge of the glass, a specific note could be heard.  However, if your finger isn't wet, it doesn't work.  Why?  Turns out, it is because there is too much friction between the finger and the glass when the finger is dry.  When the finger is wet, there is minimal friction, which allows the glass to vibrate, which produces the note.  The amount of water in the glass determines how high or low pitched the note is.  If you try this experiment, try placing a ping pong ball in the glass.  The ping pong ball will make the vibrations visible because it will move on top of the water as the glass vibrates.

    Image result for singing glasses

  4. The symbol of invention, ingenuity and enlightenment, the light bulb is perhaps a most pivotal invention in the course of human history. The advent of the lamp made it possible to render the dark of night and shed a lambency on the way to the future! Truly, the light bulb is all we could ever ask for. They say 'teach a man to fish and he will not have light but teach a man of the fluorescent lamp and he will have that light!' but in all seriousness let us illuminate the obscure nature of the fluorescent light! Different varieties of the fluorescent light may use cathodes of tungsten that release heat and electrons while being electrically heated itself and this provides the energy needed to produce the 'lighting' effects.As I have said once before in my previous blog about atomic energy levels and their associated light spectra, it was a consummation of this knowledge that we make an effective application of phenomena. A electric current passes through the mercury gas, exciting its electrons and emits high energy light as they descend to ground level. That energetic lights strikes a phosphorescent or fluorescent salt, the white powder inside the glass tube, which emits light itself. A mixture of noble gases which ionize as a result of the heat being generated by the cathodes, allowing sufficient current to excite the gaseous mercury. All these components make for an expensive assembly and their complexities make them a challenge to manufacture which results in a unattractive price. However they are known to be many times more efficient than their incandescent cousins, saving money and electricity in the long term. Fluorescent bulbs are also a environment friendly choice, while containing mercury, the construction of incandescent lamps actually produce more mercury waste. 

  5. crazycrochet20
    Latest Entry

    I have never heard of the word "luge" until today when looking at events in the Winter Olympics. Luge is a sport where there is a rider on a sled that is sliding down ice feet first. The objective is to get down the track in the fastest amount of time. They often look like this while racing...

    Image result for luge olympics

    The rider has to fight air resistance to get down the track as fast as possible. They start at the top of an ramp and then have to go around turns until they reach the finish line. Although this may not seem like a dangerous sport, riders can reach speeds of 95 mph or more. In the 2010 Winter Olympics, rider Nodar Kumaritashvili died in a practice run hours before the opening ceremony. Because of his high speed, he flew off his sled into the air and hit a metal pole. Due to his death, track designers for the 2014 Winter Olympics designed a track that went uphill in some areas which would force riders into slower speeds. 

     

    Riders rely on gravity and proper turn times to reach the finish line the fastest.

    Until next time,

    RK

  6. NASA wanted their space shuttle program to be completely reusable. Sadly, due to budget cuts, only the actual shuttle was reusable, and the boosters were ditched. On the other hand, Space X wanted to save as much money and as many resources as they could.

    Image result for spacex synchronized booster landing gifImage result

    On the right is a picture of Space X's Falcon Heavy rocket, designed to, as the name suggests, lift a large payload into space, and on the plus side, at a much cheaper cost than before. On the left is a clip of the two "small" side boosters landing simultaneously after the Falcon Heavy's test flight yesterday. Sadly, the main booster missed the landing barge in the ocean and was lost.

    By saving the boosters, we can save a lot of money and time that would be spent into making new ones for every launch.

    Also, if you didn't know, the Falcon Heavy was carrying Elon Musk's personal car, a Tesla Roadster. They put a dummy in a space suit in the driver's seat, put "Don't Panic" on the display, and the radio, even though you can't hear it, is playing "Space Oddity." Or "Rocket Man." I don't remember.

    Image result for space x tesla orbit

    If you want to check out more, here's the link to SpaceX's livestream, which also has the videos of the test flight, and a simulation of the test flight which are pretty cool.

    http://www.spacex.com/webcast 

  7. SJamison
    Latest Entry

    Elon Musk is a god! 

  8. As I said in my first blog post, I love playing soccer in my free time, so I thought I would finally explore some of the physics behind a really cool technique in soccer of bending the ball. Players often use this skill when taking free kicks to put a spin on the ball and curve their shot into the goal. This technique is famously used my David Beckham and the video below highlights one of the most famous moments when he used this technique to win a match in the World Cup. 

    It's incredible to see the curved path that the ball takes when you look at the footage of the goal head on. Players like Beckham are able to accomplish this by imparting a spin to the ball. When you kick a soccer ball with the inside of your foot and you hit the ball in its center of gravity, it is going to move off in a straight line. However, if you kick the ball with the front of your foot and kick it slightly off-center and with your ankle bent into an "L" shape, the ball will curve in flight. This is because the applied force on the ball acts as a torque which gives the ball a spin. This spinning in the air then causes the ball to be laterally deflected in flight in what is known as the Magnus effect which causes the "bending" motion of the ball in the air. You can see this represented in the image below:

                                                                                                                              world-11-6-8-2.gif.1909c1a04ad0fb2098c955038f9e3b4c.gif

    As you can see its pretty neat to learn about the physics behind this cool soccer technique and learn something new about the game!

     

  9. My Semester Review Pledge to physics:

    I really think math is fun, it's like a puzzle, seriously no sarcasm here, I really enjoy taking math tests. They are surreal in a way, and I don't even know what surreal means, they just are and that sounds cool. But time goes by so fast and I just feel like super cool when I know what's going on, like we're speaking some secret code or something that only our class knows how to speak. 

    Now, I need to take that same fascination and put it into the physics setting. Something about physics is different than math, perhaps it's that it's not the same kind of problems, physics problems often take quite a bit of thinking (no offense to BC calc) but, physics is much harder IMO and I think many of you can agree with me. 

    So I (and maybe there's more of yo out there too) need to try harder in physics. period. end of story.

    Nope wrong JK got you good. I need to take that same feeling I get with math and have fun with physics, put some more time into the understanding part so that the problem solving part comes more naturally and is in turn more fun.

  10. This class has shown me multiple times that I'm not doing enough preparation or work to succeed. It's no ordinary class where if you just put minimal effort in you will be crushed. I've learned that the hard way. I've never been more thankful for grade buffers like web assign or these blog posts, and even then I'm still procrastinating. However, one must fail in order to succeed. I strongly believe that applies to me right now. I didn't put the effort in first semester and was surprised that the class actually beat me to a pulp instead of cruising along senior year. But I've now learned from my mistakes. Stick to the schedule, put the work in, don't make up excuses to procrastinate. I'm motivated to step it up a notch and end off the second half of the year with a bang. 

  11. Well, we're half way through our senior year at Irondequoit High School and graduation in just over five months away. Where have the past four years gone?  But I am excited for the future. The second quarter was not so rough as I found a new wave of motivation upon the beginning of swim season which pushed me to work harder and keep everything the status quo.  However, that backfired as i forgot about these blogs until midterms and then had tests to study for, practice, and blogs to write :hot:. It added more stress as I had ideas to write about but never did them. Moving forward I will have alarms scheduled for each week to get a blog post done. Here is to finishing out strong over the rest of the year.

  12. As many of you know, the banana is my favorite fruit. An apple banana* a day keeps the doctor away!

    Bananas start off by being very short and straight:

    image.png.d54f7e599e7ff20b663c243c2dbef734.png

    As time goes on, however, they begin to curve upwards...

    image.png.4e5fb434fb586ab89461df9e0fc1a4ac.png

    Due to a process known as negative geotropism, which means that the bananas grow away from the force of gravity!

    image.png.800b1967e97e9e891fdfa0034f87d5f8.png

    They do this because in the forests, if they started to grow sideways towards the light that penetrates through the trees and plants above them, they would topple over. So bananas figured out that if they grew up towards the light instead of sideways, their plant would not topple over, and they would all be safe.

    Thank you for existing, bananas.

    image.thumb.png.fac5510afeb5e275b94c2d05f1af624c.png

  13. Last night my younger brother was watching one of his favorite shows: street science. I happened to walk in the room as they were doing a Galileo-inspired experiment where they were dropping different objects from a crane to show the effects of gravity and air resistance.

    At first, they dropped a basketball and a bowling ball from a height of 50 feet. Physics tells us that both objects should hit the ground at the same time because in free fall the weight of the object doesn’t matter. However, the bowling ball hit the ground before the basketball, showing the effects of air resistance. Next, they dropped two bowling balls from the same height but with different weights. They wanted to show that, while the shapes of the balls were the exact same, they still wouldn’t land at the same time. They heavier bowling ball took less time to hit the ground than the lighter one, but they were closer in time than basketball and bowling ball were. Finally, they dropped a truck and a refrigerator from a height of 50 feet. They hit the ground at the same time because in that little of a height with that much weight, air resistance does not have much of an effect. If the truck and fridge were dropped from much higher, they would not have hit the ground at the same time because of air resistance. It was pretty interesting to watch the effects of air resistance on different objects!

  14. tumblr_okb6qbsm511w2ukaoo1_400.gif.b48e767384aaaca92094172c5581f6df.gif

    Anyone who is friends with me knows I love fishing of any kind. The one which I feel is the most labor intensive per cast is most certainly fly fishing, and know any of the friends I’ve taught even the most basic casts will agree. For those who aren't familiar with fly fishing, it separates itself from any other kind with the type of rod, reel, and cats the user makes. Regular fishing uses a reel where the user casts out in one fluid motion where they wish to go. In fly fishing, the flies, or baits, are so small that the caster needs to swing the line through the air in order to get it anywhere they want. So how are casts of over 100 feet possible with flies which weigh less than a gram? Well it is actually the same principle behind a whip.

    ElaborateAssuredAlligatorgar-size_restricted.gif.c74d7c8de3b35d53c9638b31dbefe14e.gif

    A fly cast begins with a person raising the rod tip behind them while keeping tension in the line. Then the caster rockets their wrist forward. This flick of a wrist is all the momentum that is required to rocket the line forward. The small quick movement on the end of the rod translates to an incredibly fast traveling rod tip, acting like a lever arm spanning anywhere between 8 and 10 feet, resulting in a large amount of torque. Once the wrist has finished its flick around 1:30 position, then the momentum is transferred through the rod and to the rod tip which bends similar to a whip. The momentum doesn't stop there though, and this is the secret to a far reaching cast: the line. The momentum is transferred to the line which weighs considerably more than the fly itself in order to travel the needed distance. As the momentum travels from the fisherman’s arm, to rod, to line, the law of conservation of momentum applies. So, when momentum is transferred between each part the mass decreases, resulting in an increasing velocity of said part. By the time it reaches the end of the floating line to the leader, it is whippings through the air at incredible speeds. As mentioned before, this movement parallels the end of a whip.

    slp-borgerlovoll-fc.gif.97ab5d3475a4a5f09ec58ac683838003.gif

    This slowed down footage of a cast shows the momentum being transferred through all mediums in order to cast the fly.

     

    So, while I can explain the physics behind a cast, I still can't explain why whenever I have the prime opportunity to cast towards a fish, my fly always ends up snagged in a tree. That though is a  problem to be solved another day. I'm guessing it's some kind of undiscovered attractive force between the two.

     

    As always thanks for reading! - ThePeculiarParticle

  15. A partial derivative uses this nice formula. (f)/(x), where f:R^2->R is lim h->0 (f(x+h,y)-f(x,y))/h. Physics is everywhere, waiting, watching. 

  16. Hey y'all,

    Chris, a student at Cornell, wakes up at 8:59am for his 9:05 class. If the class is 1.5 km away, at what constant velocity does he need to travel in order to make it to class at 9:05? Neglect air resistance.

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    Recent Entries

    Recently in an MLB game a fan was struck by a foul ball. This person was severely injured from the baseball. My initial question was why didn't this person just move out of the way. Well, easier said than done. An official league baseball has a mass of .145 kg, and the average velocity of a major league fastball is 40.3 m/s. this means that when the ball hits the bat, if the batter perfectly squares up the baseball, the ball can leave the bat at approximately 49 m/s which is equivalent to 110 mph. The individual that was hit by the ball was on the third base side, first row. This means that there was a distance of 50 meters between the batter and the person hit. The time it took for the ball to reach the fan was 0.92 seconds. Would you be able to react that fast?

     

  17. madyrice419
    Latest Entry

    I was scrolling through Instagram and found this hilarious meme of someone's Tinder profile. It reminded me of earlier this week when Mr. Fullerton said that if a girl had the quadratic formula tattooed on her forehead, she wouldn't get a date. I guess nerds don't need love. Anyways, I entitled this blog "Dying" because, first of all, that meme made me die of laughter and, second of all, the first AP Physics C test killed me. With reflection I realized that this year is going to be a lot harder than I even first anticipated. I am not the smartest student on Earth, but I have an ambition and unwavering optimism in everything I do. Seeing that I "failed" a test really killed my spirits, and I am hoping that this class will not be the death of me. But deep down I know I can do it. AND YOU CAN TOO. We've just got to keep up with the work and keep trying. I learned that if I get slapped in the face by physics problems, I need to slap them back twice as hard. 

    meme.png

  18. So, in economics, we read this thing about someone who took all  the mints from a restaurant cashier. He was subtle at first, but eventually he just shoved them all in his pocket and left. So that was pretty funny, I'd like to dare one of my friends to try it some time.

    So I just finished that, and then I remembered I had to do a blog post (whoa, bye fourth wall), and it got me thinking about something I learned not to long ago. It's about napkin rings - more technically, spherical rings. I thought about them because, well, mints are toruses, as are napkin rings. That's about it.

    A napkin ring is an object that's the result of taking a solid sphere, and cutting out a cylinder from the center of it, all the way through the sphere. They look like, well, napkin rings. Now, there's a pretty interesting property of napkin rings, that is kinda physics-y, but it's more just mathematical. Although I'm sure there's some interesting physics going along with these, maybe some cool rotational inertia properties. Anyway, the property I'm talking about has to do with the volume of the ring. You see, if you have two napkin rings that are the same height - that being measure one the same axis along which the cylindrical hole was cut - they will always have the exact same volume. Isn't that kinda cool? You could take an orange (well, a spherically perfect orange, in the shape of a perfect sphere), and the Earth (again, a spherically perfect Earth - ours is actually fairly eccentric) and you cut them into napkin rings of the same exact height, they will have the same exact volume.

    Here's a video Vsauce made on the topic (I'll admit, it's not a very exciting video, it's just him going through some basic algebra, and proving this equal-volume property):

    So yeah, there. Something kinda (probably not really for most people, but whatever, I think it's cool) cool about a physical object. See what I did there? It's totally physics related.

    Hey! The first legitimate post, on what's sure to become a pretty cringey blog. See you next week!

  19. Dr. Chew was very helpful in giving me strategies for studying. I have turned in my questions to the videos on a separate sheet of paper in class. 

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    baseball00
    Latest Entry

    I am a student at IHS. As I dive into my senior year I hope to discover new opportunities and interests. I play baseball in the spring and summer. During my free time I like to watch sports or read; however, one of my greatest interests has always been science. I am taking AP physics C this year to further my understanding of the universe. I always knew I liked science, but taking AP physics 1 last year helped me find out that I have a specific passion for physics. In the future I would like to continue my interest in physics by taking it in college and having a career in the engineering field. This year in physics I would like to become more skillful in becoming self taught. This will give me opportunities to become a more innovative person. This year I am most excited about the independence that comes with being a senior. I am anxious for my college research process to come to an end so I can finally apply to the schools and decide where I want to go.

  20. Hey Mr. Fullerton and anyone whos reading this, its been a pleasure grinding this year. Hope you enjoy this great video and maybe even chuckle a bit. 

     

  21. Launch Time: 10:37 am

    Team Members Present: Jason Stack, Marcus Nicholas and Michael Kennedy were all present for this launch.

    Play-by-Play: Initially the rocket was created using the parts listed in the pre-flight briefing. The rocket was launched from Kerbin and angled in order to successfully travel outside of Kerbin's atmosphere. The rocket was then directed into orbit around Kerbin. Kerbin was orbited a few times. The rocket was then returned back to Kerbin by using a maneuver that brought the rocket back into Kerbin's atmosphere. The bottom engines were released, then the second engines, leaving only the pod left. The pod descended to 1,000 meters above Kerbin and then the parachute was deployed. The pod landed safely on Kerbin. 
     

    Photographs: dsd.pngdsds.pngscreenshot0.pngscreenshot11.pngscreenshot12.pngscreenshot2.pngscreenshot3.pngscreenshot4.pngscreenshot5.pngscreenshot6.pngscreenshot8.pngscreenshot9.png

    Time-of-Flight: 4 hours and 5 minutes

    Summary: Our flight was a great success. We planned to accomplish all initial milestones, including a successful manned orbit and a successful Kerbal EVA. All of these desired milestones were accomplished. Our spaceship and Kerbal manning the ship returned safely to Kerbin after successfully reaching orbit around Kerbin. By reaching a manned orbit around Kerbin, all the initial milestones were accomplished by this launch. 

    Opportunities / Learnings: Establishing what the launch goals are and designing the rocket accordingly is very important. Failure to do so will result in an inability to accomplish any milestones.

    Strategies / Project Timeline: After this accomplishment, our next goal is to reach orbit around the moon and land on the moon. 

    Milestone Awards Presented: 

    • Launch to 10 km - $10,000
    • Manned launch to 10 km - $20,000
    • Manned launch to 50 km - $30,000
    • Achieving stable orbit - $40,000
    • Achieving stable manned orbit - $50,000
    • First Kerbal EVA - $60,000

    Available Funds: $257,818

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    jrwalther
    Latest Entry

    This week I focused on chapter 5 in Mechanics.   This included momentum and impulse, conservation of linear momentum and center of mass.

    Areas that went well for me were momentum and impulse and conservation of linear momentum.  What helped me to really understand these two topics were first understand the graphs that went along with them.  This included Force vs. Time graphs showing the impulse to be the area under it.  These graphs gave me a better understanding of what I was solving for when I got to problems.

    Center of mass was the topic I had the most difficulty with.  However plotting the points on a graph helped me with this as well.  The equation Xcm= (m1x1+m2x2).../m1+m2... really helped me understand finding the center of mass of different points.  Finding it for other objects such as rods however was still quite challenging.

    My major key to success this week was working more with graphs.  Once I understood graphs whether it be just plotting point or graphs such as Force vs. Time, they all helped me get a better understanding of the topic I was working on.   

  22. NisaVyv
    Latest Entry

    Not many people put a whole lot of thought into what their morning cereal is made of. Most people would just assume there's some grain and maybe a little sugar, or a lot of sugar if you're more of a Lucky Charms person than a Raisin Bran person. Nobody would suspect, though, that there would be metal in their Cheerios. Turns out, Cheerios are magnetic. Or are they?

    Fill a bowl with water and drop in a couple Cheerios. Take a magnet and hold it just above the Cheerios, the Cheerio will be attracted toward the direction of the magnet. Why is this? If the little cereal ring is magnetic, then there must be metal fragments in it causing the attraction. Now the cereal is all magnetic, and it does contain tiny fragment of iron. This is perfectly reasonable though, as iron is a key nutrient in a human diet. But that's not the whole story, 

    If you were to try this with objects other than cereal, say a small piece of paper or plastic, it would still seem to be attracted to the magnet as it floated in the water. The "attraction" you see is actually all about water, which is diamagnetic, meaning it generates a magnetic field opposite to that of the magnetic field it is in the presence of. Thus, the water is slightly repelled by the magnet. This causes a slight divot in the water, that the object in the bowl actually falls into, making it appear to follow the magnet. In actuality, it isn't being affected directly by the magnetic field, but by the waters reaction to the magnetic field.

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